Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » General Topics

Your bat bug questions and my responses.

(4 posts)
  1. P Bello

    oldtimer
    Joined: Nov '11
    Posts: 4,863

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Nov 21 2014 22:21:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Your Questions and my Responses:

    Q: "Thank you for all the very informative information you provide; you are a great comfort in the dark times of this bed bug epidemic."

    R: Thanks for the kind words !

    Q: "I\'ve a question regarding bat bugs. Given that bat bugs travel by clinging on to the fur of animals, is it also the case that they cling on to the hair on a human\'s head?"

    R: My question for you is where did you read or learn that it's a "given that bat bugs travel" in this way???

    Additionally, should a bat bug, or even a bed bug, "cling" as you stated above to a human's hair, this would be a rare exception and NOT the norm. As such, this is an unwarranted concern.

    Q: "Also, if a pet (dog, let\'s say) is in a room where a person with a bat bug on them enters, would the bat bug then prefer to be feeding from the dog rather than the person, given that their dna enjoys feeding off bats?"

    R: Yikes ! OK, um, er, I'm thinking simply that sh#t would never happen. We need to understand that bat bugs prefer to feed on bats and maybe birds but may occasionally feed on people. And, while this is totally non-scientific but my observation from working numerous accounts where bat bugs were present, we've seen where few people are fed upon by bat bugs. At some locations we've seen where just one or two persons in the home were being bitten by bat bugs despite numerous bat bugs being present. At other locations no person was being bitten but bat bugs were present in significant numbers.

    Q: "I am trying to discern whether a residence is infested with bat bugs or bed bugs."

    R: Please note that proper identification is best done by the inspection of collected specimen by a suitably qualified pest professional. This can also be done via review of photographic evidence provided that the photos of the specimen are of proper resolution and detail for such purposes.

    Q: "I notice that no matter the precautions I use to isolate my bed (slippery tape on ceiling, ClimbUp interceptors, plastic sheet draped between box spring and mattress and over mattress (nothing touching the floor), sleeping in EcoKeeper tent and not bringing anything in with me and washing my feet and legs in pan of soapy water before entering tent right after taking a shower and using a lice comb through my short hair... I still get bitten... so I cannot help but believe I\'ve bat bugs and that they cling on to my hair the way they cling on to an animal\'s fur."

    R: I'm sorry but from the information you've posted here it cannot be determined what pest you may or may not have. Additionally, if you're taking the precautions listed above and sleeping in a bed bug proof tent device, we'd expect you'd be experiencing zero bites.

    Q: "If this is the case, how does a person get bat bugs out of their hair?"

    R: Overall and based upon the information you've provided I doubt that there are bat bugs present in your hair.

    Let me know if any other questions.

    I'm sorry your experiencing this and hope this helps ! pjb

    Sent: 11/21/14 at 09:54:51 PM To P Bello

    Reply

  2. dancingwthebbs

    Banned
    Joined: Nov '14
    Posts: 6

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Nov 21 2014 22:33:44
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks so much, Mr. Bello, for the informative reply.

    IF the insect is a bat bug, and IF it harbors in the hair on a human's head (while unlikely, possible), how would one get them out of one's hair? The bed bugs (and presumably, the bat bugs...) are resistant to the insecticides in lice shampoo...

    http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2105a.html notes, "Home Invasion

    The main means of dispersal for bat bugs is phoresy (hitching a ride on a bat to a new location). Bat bugs enter homes by clinging to the fur of their host animal."

  3. P Bello

    oldtimer
    Joined: Nov '11
    Posts: 4,863

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Nov 22 2014 8:21:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    OK, good. It's important that you're reading credible information.

    In addition to this, the Univ of AR Dept of Ent folks did a study years ago showing how birds (pigeons) that roost/nest at bed bug infested poultry farms (note that bed bugs do very well on chickens by the way) may serve to transport bed bugs great distances to other nest/roost sites. This was done by inspecting such nest/roost sites on highway overpasses where roost/nest sites had bed bugs present which were traced back to the poultry facilities.

    Now, this said we need to make common/practical sense of this information. We know that bed bugs are "adept" hitch hikers and the same may be said for bat bugs however, that this occurs is likely more inadvertent than purposeful on the part of the bugs. That is, the bugs aren't sitting there thinking something like: "I think I'll hitch a ride on that person cause he looks like he comes from a juicy family where I can settle down and raise my brood" type thing.

    To think that any such bugs hitched a ride in your hair on your head is a tad of a stretch here. Is it possible? Perhaps but, is it reasonably likely to occur? Not so much !

    None of these bugs are invisible or impossible to see. That they would possibly get onto your head and linger there for many hours such that you'd transport and support them leading to an ongoing/persistent problem is not likely.

    Of course I could be wrong here but I recommend the following:

    > Conduct a thorough inspection of your home, paying close attention to your sleep and rsting areas (Provided, of course, that you already know what to look for and how to look ! If not, check out some videos and other resources that show you how to do so.)

    > Have a friend, relative or medical professional examine/inspect your scalp, hair, head carefully.

    > Do NOT self medicate or use any on body type pesticide containing shampoos or whatever unless this is recommended by your medical professional ! ! !

    Hope this helps ! PJB

  4. dancingwthebbs

    Banned
    Joined: Nov '14
    Posts: 6

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Nov 22 2014 17:40:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for the sound advice, information and suggestions, Mr. Bello.

    I'm going to set up my CO2 trap to include the SenSci Lure in it tonight, as well as put down some insect glue boards under my baseboard heating in the corners of the room. I have read that insect glue boards generally don't catch bed bugs, but it's better than nothing.

    I did empty out the items in my dresser drawer, put them in a plastic bin, and then treated every drawer on all sides with SteriFab and EcoRaider, and looked as best I could inside where the dressers go. I didn't see any signs of them. I also checked in the closet, under baseboards, on the bed frame which in intercepted with ClimbUps. Nothing, yet.

    I'll keep at it. Thanks again! As for bat bugs hanging out in my hair... most of my hairstylists note that my head of hair is much thicker than most people's. I could draw a little cartoon about the bug hanging out in my hair for long periods of time to be feeling just as snug as a bug in a heated rug. Oh, luxurious life they're leading. Ha. One just has to find a reason to laugh during a trauma from time-to-time.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

297,432 posts in 50,192 topics over 156 months by 21,934 of 22,435 members. Latest: esedndwi, Help123, Bedbugdaydreams