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Why get an encasement?

(11 posts)
  1. bugbean

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Oct 24 2011 18:42:14
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    Hello!

    I'm new here, been reading all the posts and FAQ's and finding them super-helpful. But I have one question that I haven't found the answer for yet.

    I'm a few weeks into my battle with bedbugs, and I've been holding off on buying a mattress encasement because they're expensive (half the cost of a new mattress) and I'm not sure they'd be any more effective than the cover that the mattress came with.

    I have an Ikea Sultan Florvag mattress. It is a foam mattress with a thick white cover that zips up. The cover shows no signs of bedbugs and no damage. I have put tape over the place where the zipper ends, as it seemed the only hole big enough for bugs to actually crawl through.

    Do you think it is really possible for bedbugs to still be getting inside this mattress cover? Or if they are inside the mattress cover already, getting out?

  2. mrwitz

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Oct 24 2011 18:51:51
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    I was actually wondering the same thing. I too have an Ikea foam mattress with one of those zip covers, and it seems to me like it should provide some degree of protection. As you said it looks like the only place for the bugs to get in would be the zipper.

    I am thinking it is fine to be without one, because unlike other mattresses these are really easy to inspect. Check the outside of the cover, unzip, inside of the cover and the foam itself. There is nowhere else for them to go, and I am pretty sure that the cover could even be tossed in the dryer if it had to be.

    Truth be told, I bought my mattress in the middle of BB scare and got it because I thought it would be simple to take care of if they did turn up.

  3. laststrawsue

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Oct 24 2011 19:26:45
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    How much is an Ikea mattress? And how much are the encasements you've looked at? I really don't know much about Ikea. I heard they were inexpensive.... But when you say that you can get a whole new mattress for just 2 bed bug covers... sounds a tad odd??

    Mattress encasements would be to prevent you from having to buy another mattress, which could be very expensive... by either trapping the bed bugs in - or, hopefully, just keeping them out if they're not in it already, and therefore protecting an expensive investment.

    I can't speak to whatever cover came with your mattress or how effective it would be for keeping bed bugs from getting inside.

  4. rAVENSFAN99

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Oct 24 2011 21:47:56
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    Just curious to those with an Ikea foam mattress. . . what are you using as a bed frame? Do you also have a box spring? Thanks.

  5. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Oct 24 2011 22:00:56
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    I don't. I have a black metal bedframe (looks like Pragma Bed Frame on Amazon) that is about 14 inches tall so it's about as high as mattress and box spring. It's a folding frame with slats. From what I've read on here, it is probably a really bad idea (I read David Cain's 20 page manifesto on how to prepare a wooden bed frame correctly). I'll have to rethink this if there is ever an issue (I try to take precautions).

    I have pretty severe allergies to dust mites to it's that I can dust and clean under the bed easily. No items under the bed. Most people with this frame put a dust ruffle on it and use the underneath for storage.

    They
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    = TAOT
  6. mrwitz

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Oct 24 2011 22:19:53
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    I have a wooden bed frame and slats. As I mentioned in my first post I got this bed partially because it is a good bed for a (possible, in my case) BB situation. The wood is light pine so it is easy to inspect and the lack of boxspring means that they have to harbor on something, not in the immense cavity of a boxspring.

    I also checked out the mattress cover that came on the foam mattress, it has some kind of plastic backing on the inside that should provide a barrier, leaving only the zipper ,which seems pretty snug to me (except for the end, which can be taped I suppose). It is machine washable and recommended setting is hot (140F) and though it says do not tumble dry I am sure a hot wash would take care of any bugs on it. Since you can probably spray the foam with 91% rubbing alcohol this seems to make (in my uneducated opinion) for a washable mattress. At least it is more treatable than your standard mattress.

    I haven't optimized my bed per David Cain's specifications, but am seriously considering it. If I were to discover an infestation though, you can bet I would do it first thing after being treated. (Before treatment I wouldn't want to disturb any possible harborages)

  7. bugbean

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Oct 25 2011 18:24:48
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    I have hot-washed and hot-dried my Ikea foam mattress cover with no ill effects. The cover collected some black pills, which look ugly, but they are removable!

    I got the bedframe secondhand (before I was terrified of bedbugs!) It's an all-wood loft bed by This End Up, and it's a nightmare! After a month of bedbugs, I spent two hours and two rolls of masking tape covering up all the numerous cracks in the frame. I guess this means there may be bedbugs trapped inside, but they can't get out and bite me. If I bring in a PCO, I suppose I'll have to untape it all, but right now it helps me feel safe.

    I don't use a box spring, but the slatted bed base (also sold by Ikea) seems like a better option for keeping bedbugs in check. I suppose the rough wood at the ends of the slats would be a good place for bedbugs to hide, as well as under the fabric band that holds the slats together. But it provides a lot fewer harborages than a box spring!

  8. Canuck

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 26 2011 13:22:44
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    theyareoutthere or mrwitz - could you point me in the direction of David Cain's instructions for preparation of a wooden bed frame. I seem to have missed that one and my search on this site and Google was not very effective. Thank you.

    Sheree Swindle / certified K9-assisted bed bug inspector
  9. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 26 2011 13:37:14
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    Canuck - 12 minutes ago  » 
    theyareoutthere or mrwitz - could you point me in the direction of David Cain's instructions for preparation of a wooden bed frame. I seem to have missed that one and my search on this site and Google was not very effective. Thank you.

    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/optifurniture.html

    Its part of the advanced educational section here:

    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/advancededucational.html

    It often takes a while for Google to sift the good bedbug info from the dross that's out there, I mean please I just watched a very professional video with big budget that still claimed them to be nocturnal.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  10. rAVENSFAN99

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 26 2011 13:56:00
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    I'm a little confused at your instructions, which at one point say:

    "Any cracks or splits in the wood and in particular the slats MUST be sealed or filled with an appropriate filler to prevent them becoming harbourage points. If the part of the bed needs to remain flexible and filler would eventually degrade applying a tape covering will also suffice."

    But then:

    "Again filler should not be used as it makes dismantling the bed should it be needed a lot harder."

    Am I missing something? Are you talking about two different parts of the bed? Thanks.

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 26 2011 14:24:39
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    Yes you are missing something.

    The comments relate to the images above each comment. This means you seal the cracks and crevices in the slats to prevent harbourages.

    However you don't seal the slats onto the frame so it can still be dismantled if needed.

    I will check the text when I am in the office tomorrow and will update if I feel it's not clear enough.

    David


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