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What's this bug

(15 posts)
  1. paulaw0919

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jul 10 2010 21:41:31
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    Upon inspection of relatives house this is what we found. I think it's some sort of louce? If some one could confirm what bug this is, it would be great. Thank you

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11134728@N08/4781859158/

  2. thebedbugresource

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jul 10 2010 22:59:57
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    Looks like a Springtail.

    Sean
    Entomologist/Pest Professional
    http://www.bedbugresource.com

  3. KillerQueen

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jul 10 2010 23:09:46
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    Stop looking at everything Paula! =)

  4. paulaw0919

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jul 10 2010 23:09:57
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    It was amazing how TINY these things were. Thought they were a single spec of dust until looked at under the 30x lens. Thank you very much for your input!!

  5. paulaw0919

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jul 10 2010 23:12:56
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    Hey KQ! Finally had my mom's place inspected. Trying to do it yearly, just in case. All clear after 5 days. I can rest now again knowing she's still clear.

    And guess what.....NEW LIVING ROOM IS ON IT"S WAY!!!!!!!!!! Best to you and hope you are making time to enjoy a bit of the summer.

  6. KillerQueen

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jul 10 2010 23:18:53
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    Summer??? Whats that?

    The bugs are going crazy in this heat .... I'm sooooo packed with treatments I can't even sleep myself. I even have to be in Manhattan by 8AM tomorrow because I can't get the work done on a 6 day work week. Can you say 110 hr. work week?

    Warning: Park Slope Brooklyn is exploding out of control!!!

    Glad to hear about the furniture! Good for you, no slip covers I hope?

  7. bushbugg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jul 10 2010 23:27:54
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    Wow, KQ with on the ground reports!

  8. loubugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 11 2010 7:11:29
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    Yes, springtails, Paula.

    Why Park Slope, KQ? Any ideas?

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  9. DeedleBeetle

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 11 2010 7:40:35
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    LouBugs and KQ...

    I suppose that the heat but moreso the humidity might cause higher numbers of the spring tails because i read that they don't thrive in conditions that cause them to dry out (heat) but do thrive when there is moisture (humidity).

    But why would they be inside when they love to be outside.

    And they have little hairs that can cause skin reaction too!!

    And some scientist inhaled some springtail hairs and got very ill so please be careful out there

    And i see that they were deemed not to be insects so does that mean that they have sucking parts for feeding (i read their sucking part was for breathing but it didn't say anything about eating). Do they use the same part for eating and breathing too like we use our mouths? They wouldn't be interested in any human juices, right?

    i looked up this spring tail because i had not read about it yet. I was wondering why they would be living with humans since they're normally found outside but then i saw at wikipedia:

    "Various sources and publications have suggested that some springtails may parasitize humans, but this is entirely inconsistent with their biology, and no such phenomenon has ever been scientifically confirmed, though it has been documented that the scales or hairs from collembolans can cause irritation when rubbed onto the skin.[26] They may sometimes be abundant indoors in damp places such as bathrooms and basements, and incidentally found on one's person.

    More often, claims of persistent human skin infection by springtails may indicate a neurological problem, such as Morgellons Syndrome, or delusory parasitosis, a psychological rather than entomological problem. Researchers themselves may be subject to the psychological phenomena. For example, a publication in 2004 claiming that springtails had been found in skin samples was later determined to be a case of pareidolia; that is, no springtail specimens were actually recovered, but the researchers had digitally enhanced photos of sample debris to create images resembling small arthropod heads, which then was claimed to be springtail remnants.[27] However, Hopkin reports one instance of an entomologist aspirating an Isotoma species and in the process accidentally inhaling some of their eggs, which hatched in his nasal cavity and made him quite ill until they were flushed out.[8] "

  10. loubugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 11 2010 9:25:00
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    Well, hope the following makes sense.

    I suppose that the heat but more so the humidity might cause higher numbers of the spring tails because i read that they don't thrive in conditions that cause them to dry out (heat) but do thrive when there is moisture (humidity).
    But why would they be inside when they love to be outside.
    And they have little hairs that can cause skin reaction too!!
    And some scientist inhaled some springtail hairs and got very ill so please be careful out there.

    Actually I was referring to bed bugs and KQ's statement. But many springtails (Class Entognatha: Collembola) are found indoors because conditions are good for them: moisture, being an important one. It's not that they love outdoors, but conditions have to be right for them. Under leaf litter, wood, mulch, stones, vegetation, etc. are great areas, but on dry ground or in sun is not and they won't thrive there. I've seen them 15 feet up on the shingles on the side of my house. This is the North side and the sun doesn't stay for hours. If it gets hot, the springtails can move elsewhere. There is some algae growing there because air exits from the gable vents. It's important to mention this because otherwise people will make a general statement and say that springtails live on the siding of houses without explanation.

    Springtail body hairs and body exocuticle and possibly excrement can cause reaction in people.
    The reaction to inhaled hairs can certainly be true, but inhaled small collembola and eggs had been reported where an entomologist had been using an aspirator to collect and inadvertently inhaled them. The springtails and mites, if I remember correctly, lived in his sinuses until purged. This was noted later on in Wikipedia article.

    And i see that they were deemed not to be insects so does that mean that they have sucking parts for feeding (i read their sucking part was for breathing but it didn't say anything about eating). Do they use the same part for eating and breathing too like we use our mouths? They wouldn't be interested in any human juices, right?

    That particular Wikipedia entry didn't fully explain the springtail mouth. They are a chewing type, but housed differently (read enveloped or internal compared to external-- mouthparts visible on head) from that found in insects. No arthropods use their mouths for breathing like we do (and we have lungs connected), but in insects there is a tracheal system of small and smaller tubes that service the organs plus they are bathed in fluid; in arachnids one or two sets of book lungs and/or tracheal system by which air (various gases) is exchanged and also none of the above or in addition to above called cuticular gas exchange (gas exchange through the skin which also renders them prone to dessication). Collembola, for the most part, breathe by the latter system (One primitive group has a tracheal system). BTW, certain salamanders have no lungs and respire through their moist skin on the body via capillary gas exchange or mucosal membranes in their mouths.

    For example, a publication in 2004 claiming that springtails had been found in skin samples was later determined to be a case of pareidolia; that is, no springtail specimens were actually recovered, but the researchers had digitally enhanced photos of sample debris to create images resembling small arthropod heads, which then was claimed to be springtail remnants.

    Actually the photos were not digitally enhanced but the contrast and brightness and gamma settings were adjusted from low to high to view objects present in the slides. Images weren't redrawn to produce insect heads.

  11. DeedleBeetle

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 11 2010 10:00:30
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    Wow....wonderful. I am so thankful that you took the time to explain this to us. It's simply fascinating and makes me want to know more and more about insects and bugs. I'm almost sorry i didn't follow in the footsteps of my dad, grand dad, cousins etc and go into medicine or scientific research as a profession.... But i certainly can still enjoy learning about these animals.

    Thanks again LouBugs

  12. upagain

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 11 2010 12:56:21
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    Springtails! I find these everywhere. As Lou said, the more humid the better (but I have to say that some of "my" springtails don't seem to mind the sun, I find them all over my concrete driveway which bakes in the sun all day). I find them mostly by the ac units and the bath tub. I find them by the entrance door too but I just think thats because they find there way in under the door. They love my garbage cans. If one has been in the same spot for a day or two and I move it, there will be hundreds under there. I do a general pest spray about two times a year around the outside of my house to keep them under control otherwise I find more and more in the house.
    Paula - did you try and make them jump? Its amazing how fast they are and how high they can go. I have also found onces that are larger and can easily be seen without a loupe.

    KQ - Always giving the inside info or where to limit the travels. Hope all is well with you.

  13. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 11 2010 14:20:46
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    paulaw0919 - 14 hours ago  » 
    Hey KQ! Finally had my mom's place inspected. Trying to do it yearly, just in case. All clear after 5 days. I can rest now again knowing she's still clear.
    And guess what.....NEW LIVING ROOM IS ON IT"S WAY!!!!!!!!!! Best to you and hope you are making time to enjoy a bit of the summer.

    @Paulaw0919 - I am so happy for you. Enjoy the new furnishings.

    @Loubugs - Thanks, Lou!

    @KillerQueen - Park Slope people love their sidewalk sales. (Bad! Bad!)
    Every time I go past one I get the creeps.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  14. KillerQueen

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 11 2010 16:27:40
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    loubugs - 9 hours ago  » 
    Yes, springtails, Paula.
    Why Park Slope, KQ? Any ideas?

    Nobugsonme hit 1 strong point. There is a school on 7TH ave. that always has a sidewalk sale going on. I stop at the Starbucks on the corner all the time and see furniture, pictures, and all kinds of bed bug friendly items being sold.

    Then I go into the coffee joint and there is standing room only ... All those people sitting around and moving about ..just makes me think.

    But also ... Park slope is a kid friendly area ..I notice a lot of children and think that they are moving bugs around for sure. Plus now that school is out we have more baby sitting and camps ... so I figure this is also another reason (more people in the home or more kids going to other homes). Either that or Park Slope really just loves the Queens company =)

    Hello up again .. all is well with me, hope you are well.

    Deedle ... Loubugs .. said it all =)

  15. loubugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 11 2010 18:11:22
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    Upagain,

    but I have to say that some of "my" springtails don't seem to mind the sun, I find them all over my concrete driveway which bakes in the sun all day

    The springtails might find some moisture on concrete, especially near the grass or soil edges and there could be some vegetation, fungal growth in its surfaces, especially near soil edges. Also it isn't as hot as the blacktop driveways. And they can always move about if one place isn't to their liking. The ones on my house were on the greenish areas but in sunlight, too. Small jumping spiders also lived on the siding and on the roof.

    Deedle,

    They wouldn't be interested in any human juices, right?

    Actually certain species commonly are collected from human remains in homicide cases.

    KQ & Nobugs,
    Sidewalk street sales and kids on play dates, nannies, school and camps, etc. all help those bugs out during their hitching-a- ride scenarios.


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