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What isn't the government doing anything?

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  1. Bughelpneeded

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 23 2016 15:21:11
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    I've been struggling with bedbugs in various private rental apartments for five years. My question is, as this is now a pervasive global epidemic, why aren't scientists and government doing more to eradicate the problem permanently??? It is only getting worse. I wrote to my city council, only one councillor replied saying they had gotten them, too, but could offer no constructive long-term advice. Why can't we find a permanent solution when so many lives are being devastasted by this?

  2. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 23 2016 17:47:07
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    Fact of the matter is that many agencies and departments have and continue to sponsor research, conduct out reach and education programs and in some cases have enacted bed bug legislation, most directed at property owners and ;landlords in terms of having them address the issue of bed bugs regardless of who may have introduced them. In some cases solution has also been complicated as some of the materials banned by politicians might have been of assistance in stemming the tide but having ralied against them, they can not admit that perhaps they might have acted without adequate scientific information. Then of course there are people who simply don't care about others and do not cooperate with treatment and remedial measures. Not to mention some elderly or otherwise challenged folks who can not aid in resolution's. But I don't really think that government at least in the US have done nothing as stated.

  3. loubugs

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 23 2016 17:58:07
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    I have to concur with Winton's statements.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  4. Distressed in NJ

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jan 24 2016 14:15:45
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    In some cases solution has also been complicated as some of the materials banned by politicians might have been of assistance in stemming the tide but having ralied against them, they can not admit that perhaps they might have acted without adequate scientific information.

    This is an issue I have posted about. They need to just admit they were wrong and rectify their mistake so that people can get relief.

  5. Bughelpneeded

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jan 24 2016 15:22:33
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    Thanks for the replies. Is pressuring the government to permit certain materials to be used the way to go then? I don't think much is being done in Canada and it is getting worse. I contacted an Entomology Research Department at an Ontario university and they ignored my inquiry. It seems there is nowhere to turn. I have been thinking of doing a demonstration in Toronto, I just feel completely helpless in making any progress on this issue.

  6. Menton

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jan 24 2016 20:57:35
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    My understanding is that part of the reason for the (at least initial) lack of action was that the bugs don't carry disease. Governments were more focused on solving problems that were more serious.

    However, now that they have spread plus people realize the psychological toll it takes and, dare I say it some politicians may have been impacted, governments have stepped up the response.

  7. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Jan 25 2016 9:54:36
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    There are many issues and the time for reintroduction of carbamates and organo phosphate insecticides has passed. And while these might have offered some degree of enhanced control, treating of beds and other close proximity areas can be problematic. We have learned how to adjust treatments such as the incorporation of dry vapor steam and in some very limited cases CO2. As far as the public health aspect, yes there is a bigger concern with pests and agents that are vectors and cause disease and that's why the call it public health. While not denying the hardship and distress that
    BBs can cause they are not spreading ARBOVIRUS'S. Among causative factors at the time of their return one could include the following,
    1 The extent of their resistance to the surviving limited classes of insecticides was underestimated.
    2 An increase of introduction of bed bugs by both travel and immigration from areas where bed bugs were still present with higher thresholds.
    3 Changes in pest control use pasterns utilizing species specific baits
    4 Inexperience of at that time health and control personnel in light of the resistance paradigms.
    5 Increase in human clutter in terms of harborage and assembled furniture.
    6 Lack of regulation in regard to used/recycled mattress & worse box-springs.
    7 That bed bugs don't care!!!

  8. Bughelpneeded

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Jan 25 2016 17:15:13
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    Thanks for the responses and information. I am researching this subject on the Health Canada website and it appears that pyrethroids are the primary ingredient currently used in products such as Prelude, Dragnet, Demand, and Tempo. As stated above, bb's are highly resistant to these insecticides. I presume this comes down to a basic refusal of the Pest Management Regulatory Agency in Canada (PMRA) to try other options then due to real or supposed physical health risks. I just can't fathom how this issue cannot be dealt with effectively when it is so pervasive and damaging on every level. This is someone speaking who has tried every option possible.

  9. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Jan 25 2016 23:09:16
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    I am not up to date on Canada's regulations and options however I would say that almost all bed bug cases can be resolved in the USA by knowledgeable professionals using a combination of mechanical and chemical measures. And in the mot difficult cases the problem will be of human issues and not bed bug resistance.

  10. Bughelpneeded

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 30 2016 15:18:15
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    Thanks Winston, I appreciate your insight. I understand mechanical and chemical measures may be effective in some cases but the enormous amount of variables make it highly unsuccessful in my experience. I have had eleven licensed exterminator treatments in different rental units and in every case the bugs returned. This is someone who has done everything right: mattress encasement, climb up interceptors, diatamaceous earth, vacuuming, steaming, laundering, bleach, rubbing alcohol, mineral oil, eucalyptus oil, caulking, filling holes, endless cleaning PLUS exterminator treatments. Still every time they returned.

    I am planning to do a protest at Toronto City Hall within the next few months. I have lost five going on six years of my life due to this. To me this is a human rights issue and a societal disaster. Full on stronger chemicals will need to be permitted by government to eradicate this in any successful manner. I don't see any other option imho.

  11. Distressed in NJ

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 30 2016 17:29:45
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    Good luck, bughelpneeded. I have lost two years of my life from this. I wish it was possible to get thousands to be involved in pressuring the government to lift the ban on effective insecticides, but not many are going to publicly reveal they have bed bugs.

  12. jim danca

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 30 2016 18:08:07
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    I don't believe the future of bedbug control is going to involve 'different or stronger' chemicals.

    PCO and inventor of a bio active bedbug trap
  13. Bughelpneeded

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jan 31 2016 14:44:36
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    If anyone has any idea how to eradicate this problem on a broad societal scale please let me know here or by private message. If we pretty much wiped them out 60-80 years ago with other chemicals I don't see why this cannot be applied again. (?)

  14. Bughelpneeded

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jan 31 2016 14:47:14
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    Thanks distressed in NJ, I have no shame on this and tell everyone I meet. That is the only way.

  15. CopperbluJ

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 12:26:33
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    I'm 59 years old and haven't​ seen one until recently. I've never even seen a photo or heard much about them until recently.
    I've heard we no longer have the effective chemicals for treating them. I moved into an apartment complex that has the bugs. The owner refuses to do a thing and blames the renters for bringing them in.
    This seems to be a real problem and could become an epidemic! The board of health seemed to think nothing of it because of no proven disease transfer.
    I find that attitude terrible as babies getting the blood sucked from them isn't exactly healthy.
    I don't know if blood transferable diseases can be passed along.
    Something must be done! The government should have this problem addressed because they're hard to stop.
    I sure wish there was something we could do!

  16. psychologically_messed_up

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 12:46:31
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    Way back in the 40's, there was research done about the effect of kidney bean leaves and how they 'tangle the legs of BB' and basically stop them in their tracks. The problem is that the research was released right at the end of the war, and it was all but forgotten as everyone's minds were on war relief efforts. Fast forward to a few years ago, and the University of california, Irvine campus found and more closely examined it... upon farther magnification, it was discovered that the small hair-like fibers on the leaves don't tangle the legs but rather impale (sp?) the feet of the bugs... they've since been testing various manmade substitutes for the leaves because they dry too quickly, and are fairly small. The last updates I've seen on the research are from a while back, but I'm hopeful that this research continues, and one day soon they find the answers they're looking for.

    I don't know any more than that, or if it's even still being researched- that's one for the pros!! They'll have far more knowledge on this than any of us.

    "When you hear hoofbeats, think horses not zebras" Theodore Woodward

    I am, by no means, a pro. I'm simply a person that has had unfortunate luck, and somehow acquired the little guys.
    Any/all 'advice' I have to share is based on my own personal history and/or things I've read from the professionals on this site.
    My profession is medical, which is where I am confident in any advice I give, however rare it may be.
  17. BigDummy

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 13:14:56
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    We're going to build a mound of DE around the entire North American continent, and make the bed bugs foot the bill!

  18. Tim m

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 13:44:46
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    One word "money" bed bugs drive business billions are made off of them. I can walk into a drug store and buy 10 different so called bed bug killer products. Just in my area NY we have three major companies that deal just in bed bugs. If the government stepped in and took take of the problem billions would be lost.

  19. mp7ski

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 15:04:05
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    Tim m - 1 hour ago  » 
    One word "money" bed bugs drive business billions are made off of them. I can walk into a drug store and buy 10 different so called bed bug killer products. Just in my area NY we have three major companies that deal just in bed bugs. If the government stepped in and took take of the problem billions would be lost.

    I don't agree. Billions wouldn't be lost, it'd just be put towards other things and actually help the economy in my eyes. People are spending so much money on exterminators, most the time multiple times, when they could be using that money on other things they want or need.

    Sure, it'd kill the exterminator business, especially bed bug specific ones, but the money would be put back into the economy in better ways.

    I am not an expert, any advice I give should be considered as amateur advice and not taken as fact. I mean well with all my posts and try to give back. If you plan on using any of my advice, I suggest doing research into said advice to make sure it is in your best interest.
    Study on Thermal Death Points(pages 18-29 of pdf) : http://www.propanecouncil.org/uploadedFiles/Council/Research_and_Development/REP_12221%20Efficacy%20of%20Heat%20on%20Bed%20Bugs.pdf
    Study on Cimexa: http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
  20. BigDummy

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 15:19:06
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    Tim m - 1 hour ago  » 
    One word "money" bed bugs drive business billions are made off of them. I can walk into a drug store and buy 10 different so called bed bug killer products. Just in my area NY we have three major companies that deal just in bed bugs. If the government stepped in and took take of the problem billions would be lost.

    Yeah, that's it, you've cracked the case. Ha!

  21. Bedbugmom41

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 16:02:39
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    Winston O. Buggy - 1 year ago  » 
    I am not up to date on Canada's regulations and options however I would say that almost all bed bug cases can be resolved in the USA by knowledgeable professionals using a combination of mechanical and chemical measures. And in the mot difficult cases the problem will be of human issues and not bed bug resistance.

    I read somewhere that a university in Nova Scotia (I think) found a way to destroy bed bugs via spores that don't affect humans and pets. It was promising in the sense that BB that were directly sprayed could contaminate the harborage as well. The article said that it could be available on the market (I think it will be only via pest management companies) as soon as fall 2017....

    *** I am in NO WAY an expert on the subject. Just a poor soul in search of relief and maybe vengeance (!) from those damn bugs. ***

    Here : https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://news.psu.edu/story/457391/2017/03/22/bedbugs-beware-new-research-may-beat-back-bedbug-epidemic&ved=0ahUKEwiJ2tqQpfPVAhWF0YMKHdfBA5AQFghUMAU&usg=AFQjCNE3VdYnfQVNsU9A_OfAHAG3IlZKaA

    Sorry. It's Pen State university, not Nova Scotia.

  22. bedbugsbugme

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 19:13:26
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    Something like this can really help communities like mine that are horribly infested. I messeged them and asked when it will be available in Canada.

    I'm not an expert. Just sharing what I learned from my experience.
  23. Bedbugmom41

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Aug 25 2017 19:38:54
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    bedbugsbugme - 23 minutes ago  » 
    Something like this can really help communities like mine that are horribly infested. I messeged them and asked when it will be available in Canada.

    Please let us all know! Canada is kind of behind in the fight (in my opinion). Would LOVE you for the rest of my life if you could ask when it would be available in the province of Quebec.

  24. loubugs

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Sat Aug 26 2017 12:04:32
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    psychologically_messed_up - 21 hours ago  » 
    Way back in the 40's, there was research done about the effect of kidney bean leaves and how they 'tangle the legs of BB' and basically stop them in their tracks. The problem is that the research was released right at the end of the war, and it was all but forgotten as everyone's minds were on war relief efforts. Fast forward to a few years ago, and the University of california, Irvine campus found and more closely examined it... upon farther magnification, it was discovered that the small hair-like fibers on the leaves don't tangle the legs but rather impale (sp?) the feet of the bugs... they've since been testing various manmade substitutes for the leaves because they dry too quickly, and are fairly small. The last updates I've seen on the research are from a while back, but I'm hopeful that this research continues, and one day soon they find the answers they're looking for.
    I don't know any more than that, or if it's even still being researched- that's one for the pros!! They'll have far more knowledge on this than any of us.

    Smithsonian Magazine ran a story about the kidney bean leaves. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bean-leaves-dont-let-the-bedbugs-bite-by-using-tiny-impaling-spikes-18427074/ I had worked with researchers at a university materials sciences department. They were interested in producing these hooked trichomes. Very difficult and really didn't work well. They produced very fine fibers and these worked. I had been consulted after they produced the fibers and told them that they produced cribellate spider silk.

  25. psychologically_messed_up

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Sat Aug 26 2017 14:44:11
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    Lou that's awesome!!! I do hope that there is continued research done, and most of all that they will continue to consult with you and others in your field to create a suitable alternative!


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