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What about this idea for killing bbs

(17 posts)
  1. DeedleBeetle

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jul 4 2010 13:27:41
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    So you get a vacuum sealed bag (like a IV bag..maybe the side of one of those or could be smaller) and you have a blood product inside (i don't know if it needs to be whole blood or human blood) and you put it in a place where you suspect bugs are.You'll need something to attract them like that Co2 thingy and then when the bugs come, they find the bag of blood and then stick it and suck but in the blood solution is a poison for them. There's something in the poison that causes them to reguritate it and they do that after they drink their fill and return to their harbor places and the poison in the regurgitated blood stuff kills the others in the harbor area. After they pull their suckers out the bag, the bag self seals somehow.. Maybe they are small bags and are changed daily until there are no more bugs?

    is that too gross?

    could put the bag of blood inside a box or something so you dont have to see the ugly blood.
    Could it be some blood like product that doesn't have to be refrigerated? is there anything like blood that isn't blood?

    (if we humans are bags of blood walking around, (as far as bbs go) i wonder why we don't have to be refrigerated?...hmmm..i guess we are sort of refrigerated through perspiration)

    just thinking out loud...

  2. bushbugg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 1:18:39
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    Sounds good... but, from everything Ive heard, once within a certain area, the bugs are attracted to our body heat. The blood would have to be heated.

    Also, every video ive seen shows an amazing sense for skin; the bugs crawl on a shirt or fabric, and within a couple of inches crawling on skin, they bite. So, there may be bed bug senses we dont know about because theyre so minor, like touch or tensile strength when they step on skin...

    but YES, I would love to set up some kind of tiny altar to the bugs if it would keep them from ME!

  3. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 2:37:24
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    Okay, I have to admit I am skeptical on this. I don't think there's such a ready supply of blood that this would be feasible or even a good idea for people to be handling it. And you're talking about having a crature puncture a container of this liquid.

    On top of that, if you are going to poison them when they drink, what's the point of the blood? Do you think they will not put their proboscis into the bag (or whatever) if it has simple poison inside? (Not that I think it is a great idea beyond that...)

    Sorry to be a Negative Nellie.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  4. DeedleBeetle

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 4:15:42
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    hi Nobugs...bushbug...

    The poison would be in the blood or blood-like stuff...

    (i didn't think the idea was ready for patent!! LOL....just throwing an idea out to think about).

  5. cilecto

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 8:29:45
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    I like it. I suspect that we will be able to identify and synthesize exactly what BB are attracted to and deliver it to them with a little something extra. Also bear in mind that the poison does not necessarily need to be in the "blood". It can be on the surface of the "body" or along the way. Think of a thin layer of DE on the way to the beacon trap.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  6. mcsmcs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 9:34:03
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    How about this one for treating papers?

    I think I read somewhere that one way people kill viruses is running the paper through a copier. I wonder, if you ran paper through a copier, it would kill bugs or eggs? Probably not intense enough heat for long enough, but a thought.

  7. cilecto

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 10:05:32
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    I thought about this for a moment and assume that you mean run the paper through the processing part of the copier (where the blank paper normally goes, not the original). Yes, there's an intensely hot "fuser" (not to be confused with this guy) that would probably kill BB. You would probably need paper that's wrinkle and snag free and neatly stacked (at which point, you could just smash the stack and be done). I still like the idea. You could build a machine along similar principles that would use rollers with heat and/or pressure to treat paper, fabrics or rugs.

  8. mcsmcs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 10:16:29
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    Yes - you could copy blank paper onto your written on paper. I'm sure it would kill BBs but not sure about eggs.

  9. DeedleBeetle

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 10:26:20
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    oh crud..i just wrote a reply but then went to look at the Che stuff and lost what i started.

    I wanted to say that we already have the PackTite to treat our papers, files and books and that works great. I took the my case files and put them in there. The pages certainly are not all in order. There are slips of paper, various size papers, various thicknesses of papers, etc and the PT only took about 35 minutes or so to reach 120 degrees and then i let them cook for about 2 hours. No damage to the files..perfect.

    I think the PackTite will work wonderfully for irregularly sized papers and files. And the actual file folders and accordion folders, legal pads, index cards go in the PT nicely. The only thing i haven't tried yet (and i must) is putting gummed envelopes and labels in there.

    Reams of fresh paper could be run through the copier..i wonder which way will be most energy efficient...running 20 reams of paper through a copier or running them through the packTite?

    About the blood stuff. i was trying to figure out how to get the little critters to carry the killing mechanism back to the harbor place and spread it to the others there before they need to come out to feed. anyway...something to think about...

  10. watkinsnewan

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 10:39:23
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    what we really need invented is something like a dummy to lay in the bed that mimics the human behavior asleep so that the PCO's can come in an do there thing an we don't have to be used as bait.. we can use the dummy like they use them in crash test in cars.. humm...

  11. DeedleBeetle

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 11:23:54
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    i did think about the dummy idea but it would have been too big...need something small that can be changed daily so that it's fresh (if freshness is necessary). Years ago when i worked as a DA and had midnight duties, i actually made a dummy for myself to put in my passenger car seat when i had to drive around by myself)...and i thought about it again in this idea ...and that might work except there are already two dummies sleeping in my bed! Don't think there's room for another (especially if he ain't breathing!)
    ;-D

  12. BugsInTO

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 11:33:52
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    Keep up the brainstorming.

    My high school science teacher used to repeat an axiom that was something like "The answers, when found, will be simple" meaning that as scientific research tried to discover explanations for the universe, the more convoluted the theory, the less likely it would stand up over time, because the true answers are not complicated.

    To me, this means that anyone can come up with a good idea - they don't necessarily have to be an expert in the field. Yes, there would be lots and lots of bad ideas too, but, that doesn't mean we shouldn't give it a try.

    I prefer to think about mechanical means of killing bedbugs, because I think they will become resistant to most poisons.

    I read somewhere here a story about people taking a pig to bed with them in the old days to distract the bedbugs.

    I think about getting a pet pig (I think the litlle ones are so cute) and then having it sleep at night in its cage surrounded by a really big Climb-up Interceptor.

  13. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 11:42:47
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    In both most photocopiers and most laser printers, you get print when the device sprinkles toner (that black powdery stuff) on a sheet of paper in the pattern of the document you're printing or copying. In order to set the image, the paper with the toner powder goes past a fusing unit--which does operate at a very high temp.

    If, like me, you've spent plenty of quality time undoing paper jams on these machines, you're familiar with the process since a piece of paper that jams before the paper goes through the fuser will be covered in black powder that will get all over your hands.

    (At my day job, despite the common perceptions about university faculty as bon bon-eating spoiled types with support staff to cater our every whim, we do all our own copying. Maybe in the professional schools where they pay people terribly well that happens, but not in the humanities. I'm often I'm stuck in outdated classrooms in which I've had to use overhead projectors; yes, like the kind from grade school. If you want a surefire way to jam a copier, try running transparencies through one.

    I know my paper jams intimately.)

    I'm pretty sure that running paper through either copiers or laser printers (and this is another reason I'm, skeptical of the process. I can bet some people in sleep deprivation, desperation, or lack of technological know-how will run their papers through ink jet printers which won't do any good at all since they spray ink onto the page and lack a fuser), won't get the papers hot enough for long enough to be reliable as a way of killing bed bug eggs. In today's copiers, the piece of paper passes by the fuser unit for only about as long as I like a really good steak to get waved near a heat source before I eat it. (I was just joking with friends about this the other day. While I like my burgers well done, if you're talking about a good steak, I want it practically still mooing. When I lived in the South where people have a very different notion of rare than I do, I was often tempted to tell wait staff just to wave the steak in the direction of the heat to get one that was still rare. )

    If you think about how quickly the copier spits out your copy or the printer spits out your job, you get an idea about how little time the paper spends getting heated up by the fuser.

    The paper doesn't come into contact with the fuser for long. We know that temps of 113 degrees F will kill bugs eventually, but the lower the temp, the longer it takes.

    While the fuser's temp is hotter than that, if you're talking 120 degrees, you're still talking a matter of minutes before the bugs and eggs are reliably dead.

    Fuser units may well run much hotter than that, but I don't think we can count on them being hot enough to instantly kill all bugs and eggs especially since they don't heat all parts of the paper at the same time.

    Aside from not wanting to think about the problems raise by a bed bug infestation taking hold within something as hard to debug as a copier or a laser printer, I'm pretty sure the temp the paper reaches is not high enough for long enough for anyone to rely on this method.

    And, if people try to use the copier at work (because, let's face it, it's a rare person indeed who has a copier in his or her home. I work with people completely dependent on copying for our day jobs, and I've known precisely one who had a full-sized, hand me down office copier in the garage. Other than people who run home-based businesses with a need for a lot of copying, it's rare to find copiers in homes, and when you do, they are fare more often ink-jet based tech than laser jet based tech.), they run the risk of spreading the infestation to the office--making the chances of reinfestation go way up.

    I think that this idea has to go on the list with trying to use the sun and your car to debug items: an idea that sounds good in theory but which, in practice, is more likely to move the infestation somewhere you aren't normally going to have it and make your battle harder rather than something that is likely to be an easy do it yourself part of the bed bug solution.

  14. DeedleBeetle

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 11:43:57
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    heheeee a piglet in the bed...the babies are sooooo adorable...but they don't stay that way! Could you imagine having a wild boar in the bed..with all those bristles? Eeewwww.. but even if you took some other animal to bed for the bugs to suck on, there's no guarantee that the bugs wouldn't suck on you. It's a problem. will continue to think about it.

    do bedbugs "need" to stab something with their proboscis? could they use that tool like a straw from an open dish of some liquid?

  15. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 11:58:03
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    All my papers were in the home when I had heat treatment two years ago. Ditto with all my books. They all did fine--even the significantly older ones (I have one or two early 20th century books that are no longer in print. None of them are in good enough condition that I would consider them rare or valuable, but a few subjects I work with do require books that are hard to get your hands on these days.)

    The one thing that didn't fare so well with heat treatment--and I would presume that the same is true of the Packtite--are receipts that are printed on thermal paper.

    Those receipts, which were tax-related--kind of turned solid black. I knew that this was a possibility since I'd used a roommate's word processor as an undergrad. It was neither an ink jet nor laser; it printed on thermal paper. Our dorm rooms had old-fashioned radiators, and once, not thinking about it (I'm sure I'm been up most of the night writing), I left my printed paper on the radiator and ended up with large black streaks across it so that I had to reprint it.

    Receipts printed on that kind of thermal paper may have problems being treated in the Packtite as well. Since mine all went through thermal on the whole structure, I haven't had the opportunity to find out.

  16. sickofbugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 21:13:11
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    Some of the things said above made me laugh so hard and each time started to read again ended up laughing even harder, should be in humour file.

    I do know that about 7 years ago in Calgary there was research on how to treat lyme disease related to cattle (much much money at stake). Cattle were being bitten so badly that each year many were lost to illness, etc. What they came up with is that the cows were given something that didn't make them ill, but when ticks fed and dropped off, these ticks became sterile. Each ensuing year with this treatment, tick population decreased drastically. It helped the cows and farmers, but didn't stop the ticks who did not feed on these cows from attacking other species.

    It is a very good idea worth looking into, as I am sure a few scientists are already looking into. But we are not cows which generate much cash. On the other hand, we as humans are not considered worthy of such research, until it reaches epidemic proportions. So time will tell.

    sickofbugs

  17. sickofbugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 5 2010 21:19:04
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    Also did anyone here listen to the story about 5 years ago about a woman in the States in a small town who has raised a pot bellied pig which stayed in her house during the day while she was at work. Pigs are very very smart, can be trained same way as other pets and are easier to train.

    Anyways, one dark evening parked her car in the garage and just as she was about to enter side door to her house, two men jumped out and attempted to rob her. The side door entered into the kitchen and as she brought the 2 men into the kitchen before switching on the lights, this pig grabbed one of the men by the leg and would not let go. He was terrified and yelled at his partner in crime that a big pig was eating his leg and to get out. Anyways the 2 men were caught, but to hear this story on the radio as I was driving home was hysterical with laughter. Broadcaster could hardly talk was laughing so hard in telling the story. Weeks later, she (woman with pig also at the interview) was interviewed on TV. Very nice pig indeed.

    sickofbugs


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