Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Reader questions (do not fit into other categories)

Want to replace box spring with a 'real' bed

(9 posts)
  1. Buggy in Florida

    junior member
    Joined: Sep '13
    Posts: 89

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Oct 12 2013 8:57:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I'm thinking the best way to get rid of a huge harborage is to dump the box spring entirely and get a 'real' bed base, with less harborage for the little b#stards. Obviously it has to be one with legs so it can be isolated... any recommendations? When's the best time to do it? I want to wait till we've been treated, but how long after that should I wait? I bought encasements but we have four cats and they're known box-spring clawers so I don't give it more than two weeks before they have holes in the bottom.
    I'm thinking get something as cheap as we can find for now, and replace it with something nicer if/when we move.

  2. Emm

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '13
    Posts: 90

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Oct 12 2013 10:27:15
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I'm not sure what you mean, box springs are part of a real bed set up. You could use slats instead of a box spring mattress though, but your bed will be much less "bouncy". Plus there will still be harborages for bugs where the slats hook into the frame or in any split wood in the slats. You can't put a mattress on most bed frames without a box spring or slats--it would fall through.

    Did you mean something else though?

    Also--try double sided sticky tape on the box spring encasement where the cats scratch. That did the trick for me. My cats haven't touched my box spring since they encountered the tape. They also wouldn't touch anything that had a light coating of diatomaceous earth.

  3. Buggy in Florida

    junior member
    Joined: Sep '13
    Posts: 89

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Oct 12 2013 16:33:13
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I mean a proper bed frame with a nice headboard and footboard so you don't need to use a box spring at all, and I guess one of those wooden slat bases. I never would have bought a box spring if I realised it would get bed bugs in it! I'd really like a metal bed, but somebody on here said they're bed bug paradise.... I don't like the box spring because the headboard is just leaning against the wall (so we can't move the bed away from the wall or it would fall down)

  4. needrest

    member
    Joined: Aug '13
    Posts: 195

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Oct 13 2013 4:54:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I think I remember reading that one of the downfalls with metal bed was that some of the metal may be hollow. I quess if bb got in there they would be hard to see and treat. Emm, like idea of sticky tape. I lightly dusted DE around edges of rms. when I treated and my cat would lay in it. My cats crazy anyways.

  5. Nemo

    member
    Joined: Jul '13
    Posts: 264

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Oct 13 2013 5:29:18
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I'm confused by this. I have a "real bed" with a headboard, footboard, and frame, and I use a box spring and a mattress. I'm guessing right now you don't have a bed frame at all, and have a box spring and mattress placed on the floor, and a headboard with no frame? If this is the case a frame would help if you ever wanted to isolate your bed, because it would reduce the number of points where it touches the floor.

    If you're used to a box spring you might find that your mattress is uncomfortable if you get rid of the box spring. I'd give it a test run before trying this.

    A cheaper alternative would be mattress and box spring encasements that would seal off the mattress and box spring and reduce the number of hiding places.

    I think one additional concern some experts have with reducing harborages on the bed is that the bed bugs will go farther afield to find a hiding place, and are more likely to come up with a very unusual hiding place that you might have a harder time discovering. After all, you can't eradicate bed bugs just by reducing harborages.

  6. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,188

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Oct 13 2013 6:03:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    If you look at the link below you will find the document I mention below it.

    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/bedbugslimitedadvancededucational.html

    2011 Optimising furniture to reduce the impact of an infestation of bedbugs - Tips and principles for optimising furniture in advance of an infestation of bedbugs to aid early detection and reduce the spread. (PDF version)

    The best type of bed to work with is a simple wooden slatted bed which if optimised correctly only allows a single harbourage location for bedbugs which is easy to monitor and thus easy to resolve an infestation with.

    Beds that have all metal frames are not a good idea with bedbugs as they can force the bedbugs to harbour further from the bed and thus be more complex to resolve an infestation.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  7. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Oct 13 2013 7:57:32
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I thought there were a lot of harborage places on a metal bed. They can climb up them, right? And stay? I have a metal bed about 14 inches off the floor (no boxspring), with a passive on it. So, I'm assuming that would alert me to an issue.

    Again, I thought metal beds had lots of harborages and there were pictures of it at one point. I'll look it up later.

    They
    Are
    Out
    There
    = TAOT
  8. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,188

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Oct 13 2013 8:24:15
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    No as I have said 1000 times before metal framed beds with no wooden elements such as a bed with metal tubes and metal slats can encourage bedbugs to harbour away from it. Yes having a Passive installed can mitigate it but that is not to say it is equal to the solution I have outlined.

    100% metal beds are a bad ideal if you are concerned with bedbugs. No more can I add to that.

    David

  9. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Oct 13 2013 9:59:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sigh, I'm not listening because I like my bed


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

297,306 posts in 50,168 topics over 155 months by 21,929 of 22,426 members. Latest: MaryPoppinsYall, nomorecreepycrawlies, buggerboo