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Using storage unit to kill bedbugs???

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  1. simplyjayde

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 15 2013 16:14:58
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    Hi when I first had bedbugs and was moving, I put a lot of stuff (bagged up in garbage bags) in a non temp controlled unit. I did this back in February. Now its has not been extremely cold this winter so I am not counting on it having gotten cold enough to kill them. I am wondering if anyone knows if I leave it in the heat for a few months (its getting up to 101 already) if that will kill them? the unit is a metal shed like building with other units near it. No temperature controls, and everything but a computer and a bike is bagged up. When I do move my stuff back to my home as well what precautions should I take? Thanks for the help!!

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 15 2013 18:44:49
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    That's not hot enough really. Remember you need to reach bed bug killing temperatures at the core of every item, to kill bed bugs.

    So although bed bugs will be killed over 113F, when pros heat treat a home, for example, they don't aim for 113F or 120F. They go up to 140F or more and hold it for hours and hours to make sure every item is hot enough at the core.

    These FAQs may help, and at least one expert here may be able to advise you on using DDVP strips sealed (in an airtight manner) in with the items in order to kill bed bugs. Talk to user p bello about that.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. buggedinaz

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Aug 14 2013 18:24:05
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    I was going to post this same question when I saw this post. I have some slightly different circumstances and any thoughts or feedback would be appreciated.

    I live in Arizona and have just rented a storage unit as one phase of the process. I am going to start on the bedding and clothing and once they are treated I want to get them out of my apartment. Essentially I want to treat things and move them to the storage unit. If I got a thermometer for the unit and could check that the temperature got above 113 repeatedly over many afternoons would that seem to be enough?

    I also wondered about spreading diatenaceous earth on the floor of the unit before I started bringing things in. And can the unit be treated throughout the time my things are in there?

    Again, any thoughts or feedback would be appreciated.

  4. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Aug 14 2013 18:50:23
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    Hi,

    Does not and will not work unless you have access to a storage locker much closer to the surface of the sun, maybe one on mercury.

    If you search for "storage shed" you will find the explanation and some of the physics behind it. Alternatively google "bed bugs sun Doggett" and you will find an academic paper as to why it does not work in Australia which is an equally hot climate.

    Sorry it's not better news but air temp and core asset temp ( which kills bedbugs ) are not the same thing.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  5. buggedinaz

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Aug 14 2013 19:22:57
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    David, thank you for your reply. I had seen your replies elsewhere and was pleased it was you who responded. We are dealing with the issue with a professional but I wasn't completely convinced by some of his responses. For instance, he told me that if they were without a food source for a week they would die, when everything I've read says 12-18 months. Any thoughts on the Univ. of VA paper that said the newer breeds were more like a 2 month lifespan?

    Also, I am curious about your thoughts about treating items individually and then removing them to the storage unit. Some of what I read seemed to indicate it is better to keep things in the home throughout the treatment process or period. For instance I have several rugs I was planning to steam clean and then treat and remove. Bad idea? Part of my problem is that I am planning to move from my apartment anyway, sometime in the next few months. I live where I work and am looking for a new job.

  6. Alicew234

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 15 2013 15:17:31
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    Just a practical point. I used to work in a storage rental facility. We would be alarmed if we found the floor covered in an unidentified white powder after you moved out. The workers would not know what protections to take.
    Just let the storage people know what you are doing or make sure you sweep up before you leave to avoid any cleaning charges.

  7. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 15 2013 23:00:09
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    And, in addition to what Alice said, putting your unsealed stuff in a storage locker also puts other people's property at risk.

  8. Alicew234

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Aug 16 2013 7:56:24
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    No Bugs On Me- I was wondering about this and about how these bugs travel in general. As I understand it, they are drawn to CO2 emissions and heat. If they are somewhere- like a storage facility- where the CO2 emissions/heat sources don't stay long, will they actually move or will they go dormant?

    I understand that other people's belongings can be compromised if bugs fall off your items and they pick them up on their items in the halls of the storage. But why would they move from one bin to another if there is nothing drawing them there?

    Thanks!

  9. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Aug 16 2013 12:40:08
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    Alicew234 - 4 hours ago  » 
    . . . I was wondering about this and about how these bugs travel in general. As I understand it, they are drawn to CO2 emissions and heat. If they are somewhere- like a storage facility- where the CO2 emissions/heat sources don't stay long, will they actually move or will they go dormant?

    As I understand it, albeit my limited understanding, bed bugs are insects and do what bed bugs do, but with not all bed bugs necessarily following the "rules" they are supposed to follow. . .

    As such, I believe I have read that bed bugs are likely attracted to more than just CO2 emissions and heat . . . with examples including, but not limited to, human smell, kairmones, movement (and some might just start wondering around looking for a meal).

    These threads are basically discussing luggage and hotels . . . but, I believe, the basic concept is there, that they are attracted to other factors and that bed bugs can do whatever the heck they want to and not all follow the "rules":

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/question-about-why-bedbugs-hitchhike-from-hotels

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/why-are-bed-bugs-attracted-to-suitcases

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/bed-bugs-and-human-odor-luggagetraps

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Aug 16 2013 13:12:02
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    Hi buggedinaz,

    Yes it is true that adults can survive 12 - 18 months without food and juveniles are less.

    I hesitate to quote an exact time per instar because I am not so sure the latest data is the greatest data. In particular I am observing difference in the lab data with artificial feeding systems than through observation with a more natural source of feeding. I had a long chat with a researcher about it a few weeks ago and things he says are common from years of lab raised colonies are not observed with my field strain collected and "organically fed" bedbugs.

    I personally am a fan of leave it all in placed and deal with it correctly but my tools and approaches are really only available in the UK and parts of NY state and NJ. Even then if in the US I might be looking at other tools as well for heavier or diffused cases such as using a decon trailer to process the items as each room was worked on (think 30 mins to clear the room, hour to treat the room and 30 mins to rebuild).

    In essence though we would only remove from site if we had a heavy issue where the asset had economic value and then in the UK we have a warehouse which regularly gets filled with the oddest of items for processing, much of which is done by hand if its not PackTite possible.

    But even through trapping out of chemical control unless you are talking true fumigation with something like Vikane a public storage unit should not feature in your bedbug plan unless its for the storage of well wrapped items.

    David


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