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Urgent: are these bed bugs?? in hotel

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  1. Lima Rosa

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Thu Sep 27 2018 6:14:11
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    Urgent: are these bed bugs? or something else

    found them in hotel. Found these next to bed on the floor, all dead or remains.

    doubting wheater to leave, was in 2 rooms already

    one is skeleton, other is top and bottum picture and a beak or small bug

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ttSxJtXzHiiGVcjvpJ_I2HZAciGDJsaL

  2. loubugs

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Thu Sep 27 2018 7:30:20
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    Lima Rosa - 1 hour ago  » 
    Urgent: are these bed bugs? or something else
    found them in hotel. Found these next to bed on the floor, all dead or remains.
    doubting wheater to leave, was in 2 rooms already
    one is skeleton, other is top and bottum picture and a beak or small bug
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ttSxJtXzHiiGVcjvpJ_I2HZAciGDJsaL

    No bed bugs

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  3. Lima Rosa

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Thu Sep 27 2018 7:32:09
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    Thanks so much, do you have an idea what it could be, since the body with ribbons is so similar?

    once again thank you!

  4. loubugs

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Thu Sep 27 2018 16:04:40
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    Lima Rosa - 8 hours ago  » 
    Thanks so much, do you have an idea what it could be, since the body with ribbons is so similar?
    once again thank you!

    Ribbons? The abdominal segmentation is something that you can see in almost all insects, so not at all diagnostic. It's actually a beetle. The head and (pro)thorax comprise one piece and the other body part is the abdomen. Wing covers evident, too.

  5. Lima Rosa

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Sat Sep 29 2018 19:36:13
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    Thanks again, that will help in the future, since I travel a lot.

    One last question which I hope you can answer, the first 2 pictures are from an exoskeleton, and I found this in the first room I was in. Can you extract from this image if it could have been an bedbug, maybe after secretion of skin?

    Or also very clearly not a bed bug?

    Many thanks,

    Nicky

  6. loubugs

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Sun Sep 30 2018 8:26:45
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    Lima Rosa - 12 hours ago  » 
    Thanks again, that will help in the future, since I travel a lot.
    One last question which I hope you can answer, the first 2 pictures are from an exoskeleton, and I found this in the first room I was in. Can you extract from this image if it could have been an bedbug, maybe after secretion of skin?
    Or also very clearly not a bed bug?
    Many thanks,
    Nicky

    What's presented in your pictures are not shed skins, but whole body parts. As I noted, it's a front section consisting of a head and prothorax (no legs) and a separate rear section (meso- and metathorax plus abdomen) of a beetle, maybe a carabid ground beetle. Wing covers (elytra) are evident. The stubby appendages are parts of the legs. The sharp-looking pieces are the extended mandibles. Antennae are missing.
    You don't understand insect metamorphosis. In true bugs (bed bugs, for example), there are immature (nymph) stages that shed their skin to get to the next stage of development before arriving at the adult stage. In beetles, the immatures are called larvae. These molt to larger larval stages and to the pupal stage. The adult develops here and then emerges from the pupal stage. Hemipterans (true bugs) are hemimetabolic insects while Coleoptera (beetles) are holometabolic insects. An insect's outer skin must go through chemical changes to harden it and render it usable and protective.


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