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Type of bed for easy BB detection/trap

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  1. player

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Jan 29 2015 14:21:08
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    Need a new bed.

    Want to buy a bed that would be best to detect BB's easily. Am thinking a bed with springs, rather slates, white metal frame rather then wood or any other. I'm thinking metal with climb-ups and Passive Monitors would be quick and easy in detecting and checking s it gives BB's less hiding places and a home for them in the Passives - I am right ? Or would metal beds still not be recommended ?

  2. robinsmom

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Jan 29 2015 17:35:46
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    David Cain had a post in this. I *believe* he said the worst bed to detect bb was metal, because instead of harbor ing on metal bed they would prefer to hide off the bed which would mean they'd disperse and harbor where they'd be hard to find and treat.

    It was a good post. I hope someone can link it. But if I temember, it went from best being solid unfinished, to light colored painted wood, to worst being dark painted ir stained wood, to very worst being metal. All screw holes were to be filled it covered with clear tape. Including the ones on slats. I don't recall a preference for springs...he likes the minitor to be put on a slat, the area there being unfinished. He may have said something about the bed being finished to seal cracks n gaps but not sure where an unfinished bed plays into this. He may ha e meant unstained.

    I'm not an expert just a dumb struggling bed bugger like every body else.
  3. player

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Jan 29 2015 18:10:27
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    Hi,

    I see and understand as you mentioned why metal beds can cause concern. But I was thinking by using metal/spring beds with passive monitors can work as an advantage, and also less time consuming on checking due to less hiding places, but also a passive home near by so they'll remain on the bed. Will try and find the link as mentioned. Thanks.

  4. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Jan 30 2015 4:48:27
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    Hi,

    If the aim of the exercise is to detect as quickly as possible the best bed is one that enables that the fastest.

    As such the best bed is a simple wooden slatted bed with the recommended modifications in the "optimization of furniture" guide I have written.

    However that having been said we have over the years collected data to show that with box spring / divan and wooden slatted beds the optimization is not as important as a correctly installed monitor as they will find it and use it when its present.

    Hope that makes sense.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  5. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Jan 30 2015 8:45:39
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    Hands down - metal bed frame without a box spring and the mattress encased. No need for anything else ... Unsightly, not always effective, and a waste of money. Your mattress encasement becomes a giant monitor and it's the best one on the market.

    Just did a treatment with a wooden slat bed where the owner missed the evidence and a "pro" that was called in to inspect also missed the evidence. Roughly two weeks later the owner found a bug in a glue board on the floor. Weeks of bites and reproduction because the wooden bed provided too many hiding spots for easy inspection.

    [name calling deleted] - use a metal frame and mattress encasement.

  6. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Jan 30 2015 10:19:35
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    I have an all cotton, foldable futon mattress on a carpeted floor.. Headboard is basically the wall. No frame, platform, box spring, etc. No mattress encasement. Most of the time it's laid out. Sometimes it's folded in thirds.

    Is this a good setup for detection and treatment? I could add a mattress encasement if that helps but my thinking was that the cotton futon mattress would provide harbonage that I could fairly easily inspect. Will the mattress encasement work the same way in my setup or will the bed bugs go elsewhere to harbonate making inspection more difficult?

    Richard

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Jan 30 2015 11:11:04
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    Hi Richard,

    Its not ideal because without good and obvious harbourages bedbugs seek the next best options which are usually further away and thus you end up with a larger issue because its more dispersed. This is especially true in a "minimalist" set-up like yours where the research of Sheffield University and in particular the PhD thesis of Richard Naylor illustrates that the removal of the thygmotaxic stimuli caused by the piping on the mattress edge can further induce dispersal.

    I am just back from a case today where we actually used Passive+ to screen the building because as a care facility anything else was too much disruption. We last installed one in one of the worst rooms on 12/12 and due to a management delay and Xmas we only got to site today to start the full treatment. Even I was shocked to find that 80% of the bedbugs in the worst room were now associated with the monitor, either inside it or within an inch of the install site.

    The "old wives tale" about metal framed beds comes back to two historical facts:

    • Hospital beds and procedures revolve around metal and as such there is a lot of old stuff written about metal beds
    • In some parts of the world the control measures include taking your bed on to the properties flat roof in the summer months and flaming the bed

    Given that mattress encasements are not allowed in some of the places we work due to infection control I would hate to "have" to rely upon them in the way that others do. We prefer to do quality work and actually resolve the issues in a way that does not adversely impact peoples health such as through the use of synthetic chemicals. I have not read the latest news today on indoor pesticides and ADHD but having read the papers on insecticide and cancer I decided it was a bus I no longer wished to travel on.

    David

  8. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 14:20:16
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    Richard56 - 1 week ago  » 
    I have an all cotton, foldable futon mattress on a carpeted floor.. Headboard is basically the wall. No frame, platform, box spring, etc. No mattress encasement. Most of the time it's laid out. Sometimes it's folded in thirds.
    Is this a good setup for detection and treatment? I could add a mattress encasement if that helps but my thinking was that the cotton futon mattress would provide harbonage that I could fairly easily inspect. Will the mattress encasement work the same way in my setup or will the bed bugs go elsewhere to harbonate making inspection more difficult?
    Richard

    A mattress on carpet against a wall is about the worst setup you can have. First thing I would do is get the mattress off the floor and put it on a frame and then think about next steps

  9. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 15:19:54
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    BBUK: Its not ideal because...
    KK: carpet against a wall is about the worst setup ...
    ------------
    Well, the gods have spoken so I I guess it's not a great setup

    In fact, didn't set things up thinking about bed bugs but more for the minimalist look and the flexibility of folding up the futon and gaining a room.

    That said, I am curious WHY it's such a bad setup?

    My thinking is that since I have no frame or box spring, there would be fewer places for the bed bugs to hide/harborage, and also, in the event of an infestation, fewer places to treat.

    Specifically, I thought any potential bed bugs would either be found in the corner cotton folds of the of the futon, or in the passive cardboard monitor I have placed between the futon and carpeted floor sticking out toward the wall. Both places are very easy to inspect as to give me an early warning system.

    So where have I gone wrong in my thinking?

    Richard

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 15:39:30
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    Hi Richard,

    In my case the explanation is not what you take away but its what you provide. Studying colonies and mapping even the most advanced cases show that activity is centered on the bed which is more traditionally a mattress plus base than just a mattress. In essence this is what bedbugs expect and in fact to some extent seek.

    If you have just a mattress and then make it less attractive by removing the thygmotaxic stimuli of the piping bedbugs are more likley to harbour in areas further away.

    It very much comes back to my bird box analogy. If you want to attract birds to your garden feed them and provide safe houses for them. Its a lot like rate and mouse poison, you tend to get better "take" then the rodent feels safe and comfortable eating.

    An optimized bed as I have previously outlined provided an appealing structure but limited harbourage opportunities so they natural channel bedbugs into places where they are easier to deal with. I guess at the end of the day I am one of those "teach people to fish" people.

    David

  11. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 15:49:32
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    BBUK: Richard Naylor illustrates that the removal of the thygmotaxic stimuli caused by the piping on the mattress edge can further induce dispersal.
    --------------
    Are you talking about the piping around the top of the mattress, or the piping on the bottom of the mattress where it rests against the box spring. Or perhaps both? I thought the cotton folds in each of the futon corners (plus your passive monitor against the wall) would achieve the same thing, but perhaps I should contact a Japanese PCO to see how they handle the futon situation

    Richard

  12. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 16:04:50
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    Dam, long reply swallowed by a site crash.

    Are we talking western futon or traditional tatami mat?

    David

  13. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 16:25:54
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    Neither really. I don't have a tatami mat which is usually made from some sort of straw and sometimes serves as a platform for the futon mattress. My mattress is not the very thick American futon mattress that you see in department and most "futon stores" folded up into some sort of couch.

    Mine is a slightly thicker version (can't find the really thin futon mattresses in the U.S.) of the traditional Japanese futon mattress, that in Japan is usually folded up after use and put into a closet during the day. In my case, I leave it in the room usually unfolded, but sometimes folded in place. It is 100% organic cotton (cover and inside batting) and as mentioned, is constructed with folds on the corners where I thought bed bugs might hide and therefore be easy to find.

    You can see a picture of something similar here: http://www.miyashoji.com/futon/

    Note again that I only have the mattress (seen folded) not the tatami mat pictured. (I would imagine the straw tatami matt would be bed bug heaven and nightmare to treat? )

    Richard

  14. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 16:41:07
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    OK, good design of bed. It can clearly be dismantled to its basic parts so its easy to be thorough if you non chemically treat.

    I would like to see the slat arrangement but I don't see this as being anything more complex than a standard wooden slatted bed. If you cover and seal cracks and crevices you leave them few other options as to where to occupy. Add in an ability to see faecal deposits from a distance and you have a perfect solution.

    David

  15. loubugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 16:44:42
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    I think I remember EffeCi who once posted an image of a metal bed frame and spring system that was infested with bed bugs.
    If you set up any bedroom and furniture, but you take away harborage areas, then they have to find harborage areas, most likely new places and not where they've been all the time. If you place out attractive harborage areas in these situations, these now become the monitor devices.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  16. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 16:53:32
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    loubugs -  » 
    I think I remember EffeCi who once posted an image of a metal bed frame and spring system that was infested with bed bugs.

    I remember that Lou . . . I think this is what you are talking about?

    EffeCi -  » 
    Here are some of my fecal spots pics on different surfaces.
    fecal spots on metal bednet spring
    fecal spots on metal bedframe

  17. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 17:01:14
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    BBUK: OK, good design of bed. It can clearly be dismantled to its basic parts so its easy to be thorough if you non chemically treat.
    ----------------------
    The picture I provided a link to may be confusing. I only have the cotton futon mattress (shown folded). I do not have the platform underneath. I keep the cotton futon mattress usually unfolded on a carpeted floor against a wall with a passive monitor at the head of the bed between futon and carpeted floor. Occasionally I fold it up in thirds as shown in the picture.

    Richard


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