Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tools/ideas for fighting bed bugs

Tips

(5 posts)
  1. Thesecret2

    newbite
    Joined: Jan '17
    Posts: 1

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Sun Jan 22 2017 11:37:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hello,

    A few tips:

    Keep a journal, each siting (date and time), approximate size and color of bug!

    Isolate room: vacuum, use hotshot RESIDUAL Spray to isolate room, spray floor around moldings, even in the closet!! Hot shot spray says it is effective for 1 month, but I treated every two weeks. (wear a thick mask because you don't want to inhale this stuff nor the DE that will be mentioned later). Empty vacuum immediately upon finishing vacuuming!

    This part is up to you but i opted/experimented to keep my bed and box spring unsealed.

    After the room is "baracaded", I removed my bedding, put in separate bag and proceeded to wash and dry on high temps! I purchased a mcculough steamer, and steamed out the box spring (important to cover nozel with rag and go slow!) let air dry. Baracade room before moving things around to prevent spread of these ugly pests.

    I used DE powder underneath furniture, and the spray on the furniture legs. DE is an effective killer but it can take up to 10 days to work! (I've experimented with this stuff for about a year and have found to help limit the infestation, I also didn't want to use harsh pesticides but gave in only recently). Most likely these bugs will hide in the boxspring (after doing research), if you remove the box spring they will jus find another place, within the room or the house to hide!!

    It is important to keep track of sitings in your journal. I'm on my 2nd month out of the last treatment, no new sitings! But just because you can't see them doesn't mean they aren't there. These bugs can hide and live off of one feeding for up to a year! There were listed certain times these pests like to come out to feed, but really they can come out anytime if they are hungry enough!!

    Also, just shaking your clothes, or brushing off your body won't make these pests move, they have hooks on their legs that help them hang on (incredible hitch-hikers!). Heat will destroy them! I have a space heater and experimented with temperatures (put a live bug in a sealed plastic bag and held up to space heater on high temp), bug died upon bag melting slightly, held bag up for about 3-4 secs?

    Again I haven't had any new sitings (dead or alive) in about 2months, including "bite" evidence, which I rarely noticed anyways.... some people don't react to the bites, but when I first encountered these pests I saw the actual bugs, a blood stain (on bedding), and maybe 2 feeds/bites (itchiness, no redness)

    Lacked funds to do professional so I tackled/tackling these things on my own! Also considered multipurpose tools (DE is foodgrade, steamer is great!!, hotshot kills multiple pests!).

    Let me know if these tips help you out!

  2. Poiqm

    Account Closed
    Joined: Jan '17
    Posts: 474

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Sun Jan 22 2017 17:35:37
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Congratulations on being bed bug free so far! A year is a long time to battle them, I'm so glad you found a treatment strategy that's working for you.

    I used DE powder underneath furniture, and the spray on the furniture legs. DE is an effective killer but it can take up to 10 days to work!

    If Cimexa is available in your area you may want to consider switching to it. It is more effective and works faster.
    http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/

    I'm on my 2nd month out of the last treatment, no new sitings!

    For how long did you do the treatment every 2 weeks?

    Heat will destroy them! I have a space heater and experimented with temperatures (put a live bug in a sealed plastic bag and held up to space heater on high temp), bug died upon bag melting slightly, held bag up for about 3-4 secs?

    There has been research on the topic regarding specific temperatures and length of time they need to be exposed to kill all life stages as well as eggs. Recalling from memory it is something around 120F for 40 minutes, 145F for 10 mins, 181F for instant kill. Check into it for exact temps and times.
    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/100-death-point-for-bed-bug-eggs-higher-than-initially-thought

    Again I haven't had any new sitings (dead or alive) in about 2months, including "bite" evidence, which I rarely noticed anyways....

    Since you don't react to the bites, how are you monitoring the bug population? Are you using bed bug monitors or interceptor traps to find live bugs? Or doing inspections? What are you relying on to "see" bugs?

    Account closed
  3. bugged-cdn

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '14
    Posts: 640

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Sun Jan 22 2017 18:18:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Doesn't mean they aren't there. These bugs can hide and live off of one feeding for up to a year!

    That may be true but it won't happen in an occupied dwelling where a host is available.

    Please don't use, or suggest using, a space heater to "heat treat".

  4. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,262

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Sun Jan 22 2017 18:27:18
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thesecret2.

    Welcome to the forums!

    Isolate room: vacuum, use hotshot RESIDUAL Spray to isolate room, spray floor around moldings, even in the closet!!

    I've never heard an expert recommend isolating a room using a pesticide spray.

    Heat will destroy them! I have a space heater and experimented with temperatures (put a live bug in a sealed plastic bag and held up to space heater on high temp), bug died upon bag melting slightly, held bag up for about 3-4 secs?

    I agree with bugged-cdm that using a space heater to treat is not a good idea.

    Please note the forum rules state that consumers should not try and give advice to others on pesticide treatment, or anything else they're not experts on:

    Giving Advice

    Please do not give advice on anything you're not qualified to give advice about. This is tricky, in terms of rules, because to some degree, you have to regulate yourself.

    Most consumers -- even those who have self-treated their homes -- should not be giving advice on which pesticides to buy and how to use them, for example, telling people to buy DE or how to apply DE.

    Offering a description of what you did for yourself in a post about your bed bug story is okay but this is very distinct from suggesting others do something similar. If the thread is one where a request for treatment advice is being made by the OP, you may have already crossed the boundary between "describing how I got rid of bed bugs" and "giving advice to others on treatment".

    If we have a FAQ on it (like DE or steam), please direct people to those. If you don't agree with those FAQs or think something should be added, then please make a suggestion about that. Remember there are qualified experts here who may be willing to answer questions about pesticides and you can direct users to them.

    As you can see above, I like to distinguish between saying "this is what I did" and "this is what you should do". The former is okay, in your own thread about your experiences. The latter is probably not advice you should be giving. Mentioning tips and telling people to "use" this and do that is giving advice.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  5. BigDummy

    oldtimer
    Joined: Dec '13
    Posts: 4,628

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2017 16:56:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    "Norman! Put me in my chair."


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

295,691 posts in 49,781 topics over 154 months by 21,790 of 22,255 members. Latest: bedbugsonthebrain, Worried-bedbugger, Smacker82