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Time between chemical treatments

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  1. moxtr

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 10 2016 1:11:36
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    What is the optimal length of time between first and second chemical pesticide treatments? Thanks

  2. GeekOnTheHill

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 10 2016 6:54:53
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    It depends on the insecticide. The label usually has that information. Look for "re-treatment interval" or "re-application interval."

    When using contact insecticides with no residuals, two additional treatments one week apart is a popular approach because of the bed bug's life cycle. Eggs hatch in six to ten days and reach reproductive maturity in four to five weeks, so the one-week cycle, in theory, would kill the nymphs after they hatch but before they reproduce. But that assumes that each treatment contacts and kill all the nymphs, which would be unlikely in most real-life situations.

    Richard

  3. moxtr

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 10 2016 12:46:17
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    Thanks, I have read 10 to 14 days most places but my PC tech said he would be back in 2 or 3 weeks which seems long, He used Temprid,Transpott,Gentrol,Exciter and Cimexa dust he also applied Nuvan aresol into holes he drilled into the walls by the baseboards. I will call him to come sooner. Thanks and if anyone else has input it is welcome.
    Now I have to deal with the heater of my Packtite Closet not heating up.

  4. GeekOnTheHill

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 10 2016 12:58:02
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    moxtr - 52 seconds ago  » 
    Thanks, I have read 10 to 14 days most places but my PC tech said he would be back in 2 or 3 weeks which seems long, He used Temprid,Transpott,Gentrol,Exciter and Cimexa dust he also applied Nuvan aresol into holes he drilled into the walls by the baseboards. I will call him to come sooner. Thanks and if anyone else has input it is welcome.
    Now I have to deal with the heater of my Packtite Closet not heating up.

    There's no need to call him to come sooner if he's using those products. His schedule is well in line with the labels and the residual effectiveness of the products that he used.

    Richard

  5. bitemelady

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 10 2016 15:23:26
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    Sorry to jump on this thread/question.. but mine used "JT Eaton Onslaught Micro".. which seems to be something you can get on Amazon or Home Depot (I'm freakin dying).. does anyone know how long between when they spray that first and return again?

  6. GeekOnTheHill

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 10 2016 19:47:20
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    bitemelady - 3 hours ago  » 
    Sorry to jump on this thread/question.. but mine used "JT Eaton Onslaught Micro".. which seems to be something you can get on Amazon or Home Depot (I'm freakin dying).. does anyone know how long between when they spray that first and return again?

    I can't find a JT Eaton product by that name. I can find Onslaught, but not one made by Eaton. I have never used any of them, so all I can offer is educated speculation. In other words, it's worth exactly what you're paying for it.

    The Onslaughts I found all have esfenvalerate ( (S)-cyano (3-phenoxyphenyl) methyl-(S)-4-chloro-alpha-(1-methylethyl) benzeneacetate) as their active ingredient, which is a cyano-pyrethroid that would have have some residual effectiveness. The "Micro" in the trade name would indicate that it's in a microencapsulated formulation, which would further extend the residual effectiveness.

    This active ingredient appears to be the "S" isomer of an older chemical called fenvalerate, which we used back in the 1980's under the trade name Pyrid. That product had about a month residual effectiveness on clean surfaces.

    The labels I just looked at all specified the retreatment interval for Onslaught as "Repeat applications as needed, but do not exceed more than one (1) application every seven (7) days." That doesn't mean that the residual only lasts seven days. It means it's illegal to apply it more frequently than once every seven days. I'd expect the residual effectiveness when applied to a clean surface to be at least a few weeks.

    Again, I have never used this product, so take my comments with a grain of salt. Also, none of these labels were from the Eaton product, which I can't find. It may be different. Did the PCO give you a specimen label?

    Richard


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