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Storage Bins instead of bags?????

(10 posts)
  1. Sleepless_In_Mass

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 15:14:33
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    Looking for advice....

    My family is going nuts with the ziploc bags. Any thoughts on using storage bins instead? I know they are not air tight, but I was thinking of treating them like a bed and isolating them. Has anyone tried this? Any suggestions on how to make this work?

    Any help is appreciated!

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 16:52:40
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    If you are in the US, The Container Store sells two bins which are advertised as "watertight". (Not waterproof-- they actually have a watertight inner seal.). They are a bit pricier than Rubbermaid, but those aren't easily sealable as you know.

    There are two sizes -- a watertight trunk which
    is around $40 and holds about 3-4 Xl ziplocs worth of clothing (which can be packed tightly).

    There's also a smaller box which holds about 1/3 less and costs around $20.. Both stackable.

    I have used these. They'd be a lot easier than fiddling with bags.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. Sleepless_In_Mass

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 18:06:27
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    Thank you!!! You probably just saved my sanity

  4. MarriedinCA

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 18:53:48
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    Since I've seen the Container Store watertight bins mentioned a few times I decided to look them up, and it actually looks like they have several different sizes of watertight storage containers, two of which seem to be meant for files. Seems like something worth investing in!

  5. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 21:15:06
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    Dear Sleepless,

    Regarding plastic storage bins:

    > At times I use such bins for my field work. I also use such containers to retain live BBs.

    > My primary concern with these bins is that the internal surfaces are smooth enough to prevent BBs from crawling up the walls. Some bins have "vent holes" which I seal with packing tape if need be.

    > Last week at our local office store (Staples) I noticed that they now have "water tight" file containers. These units are robustly built and come in both letter and legal size file boxes. They cost a tad more than the non-water tight storage boxes but are probably worth it for your purposes.

    Hope this helps, paul b.

  6. Sleepless_In_Mass

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 21:46:23
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    Considering all the costs we have already incurred with this problem, I am concerned we may not be able to afford the additional cost of these bins for a family of four. I am considering the following

    * Using non airtight bings
    * Placing them on a ping pong table in our basement family room (this is where we are currently keeping the bags)
    * Isolating the ping pong table using climb-ups
    * Placing double-sided stick tape around the edge of the table
    * Finally, we would dry our clothes for the day the evening before and put them in smaller bags

    Does this sound like a feasible plan? Or am I being foolish not to incur the additional cost or stick with the bags? The problem is I would have to put the bins on a credit card, like we have with so much of the costs of this mess!

  7. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 22:08:40
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    Dear Sleepless,

    You can also use large trash bags and simply twist tie them once your clothes are placed inside as this will effectlively seal out any BBs. I prefer to use large white bags. You can also use the bins & bags in combination. Note that the trash bags are relatively inexpensive.

    Yes, I like your isloate the ping pong table idea.

    Maybe put the dbl sided tape around the table legs. Do so by putting it in two or three parallel rows that are seperated by about one or two inches. In this way, you will have three sticky barriers that the BBs would need to defeat to pass thus stacking the odds in your favor.

    Non-airtight bins work, I've used them occasionally.

    I understand that limited resources are a concern for you and there are ways to overcome these constraints.

    Please note that unless your location is a "BB Ground Zero" type I would not expect that BBs would be looking to get into your stuff on a ping pong table located in an area away from where folks are sleeping.

    Hope this helps, paul b.

  8. Sleepless_In_Mass

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 22:36:57
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    Thanks, Paul! This is extremely helpful.

    Since I have your attention, can I pick your brain on one more thing?

    We put most of our non-clothing items from the bedrooms in the garage. This was before we talked to the PCO. Many of these things were unsealed. At the time, it was pretty cold out in New England.

    The garage is attached, if anything made it out there, how do I prevent them from coming in the house? I am putting everything through the PackTite and then sealing it. But there is a LOT of stuff.

    I am mostly concerned about toys, because the infestation was mostly isolated to my youngest sons room.

    Thanks again!

  9. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 1 2012 23:27:44
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    You may have already thought about this, but I just thought I'd pass it on in case you haven't.

    I had my bed bug infestation in the summer--during a heat wave.

    This, in some ways, made what I'm about to suggest slightly easier than it's going to be for you given the weather there. (I just got back from a holiday trip to New England, so the joy of 16 layers, including 3 of outerwear is quite fresh in my mind, despite my screen name.)

    I went to Target and bought three complete sets of cheap outfits to wear in the house: sports bras that I didn't care about, polo shirts, and men's basketball shorts.

    When I got home from work each day, the work clothes went immediately into a bag.

    I put on a set of my "house" clothes. (I went with polo shirts instead of t-shirts because I couldn't find a single t-shirt at Target that could be washed in hot.)

    If you already have comfy clothes that can be washed in hot, you don't need to buy anything, just pick three complete outfits per person.

    Once the out of season stuff is debugged, it can be sealed up. (I do realize that right now, the in-season stuff is a lot bulkier and plentiful than the out of season stuff, so I know that's a big bummer.) If it's not something that you need to wear during treatment, you can put it in garbage bags, no problem. Garbage bags can be sealed up tightly enough to work; the reason you don't want to store your everyday stuff in them is that you need a new bag each time you go in there for stuff.

    I limited the amount of bedding and linens I used: one sheet, one pillow, one bath towel, one hand towel, one hair towel.

    AGain, I get that that's really a lot harder in New England right now, but don't forget that you only need regular access to a few days' worth of stuff at a time. That's what you'd want to put in bins or big ziplocks. The stuff that you can live without for a month or two can go in bags.

    And, yes, I get that with a family it's a lot harder than with a single person, but to cut costs, you may want to use bins/ziplocks for the stuff you need to access regularly, but not for the stuff you don't need to sort through regularly.

    The outside the house stuff can be stored in plastic bags

  10. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Jan 2 2012 8:31:28
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    Dear sleepless,

    Kids should have their toys if possible.

    Run the ones they're using through the packtite so they can be brought in and played with.

    The others can be sealed in plastic bags.

    Use your packtite and your dryer, make good common sense decisions and ask questions if in doubt.

    Good luck, hope this helps ! paul b.


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