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Specifics for Vikane treatment - children's cribs, camping gear and tents, etc.

(8 posts)
  1. existentialbug

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Apr 5 2015 11:30:39
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    Hi folks,

    Next week my family and I are moving out of our apartment and into a new, bedbug-free apartment, with a fumigator treating all of our belongings in our moving truck before we move in to the new unit. We only made the decision to do this a few days back, and the move is on Tuesday, so we're rushing to pack.

    We have been given general FAQs about using cardboard bins and avoiding plastic storage containers and ziplock bags, but what to do about some of the following?

    --"Pack & Play"-style collapsible children's cribs (these have a polyurethane foam in the very thin mattress at the bottom -- is this a concern?)
    --camping tents (we have three, two small and one enormous tent, and they are all packed in their stuff/storage bags)
    --packed ground cloths for tents (folded and in their stuff sacks)
    --dry bags (camping, again)

    In short, we have a ton of camping and climbing equipment. We did buy a Packtite in order to treat some of our clothes going forward (we live in NYC and have no idea how we got bedbugs to begin with) but want to put everything in the truck to be treated. The fumigator is away for the Easter weekend and has not answered us on such items yet.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Did anyone in here with a "success story" have tents and other camping gear treated? What about the infant crib? Thanks, EB

  2. icecream7

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Apr 5 2015 19:44:10
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    fumigants are dangerous toxicants. you should ask your fumigator these questions.

  3. P Bello

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Apr 5 2015 22:07:20
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    Fumigation treatments are a serious matter and are conducted by applicators with specialized licenses, equipment and training.

    Fumigation treatments must be suitably vented and cleared prior to re-occupancy.

    Overall, you should have no issues if your applicator knows what he or she is doing but it is ise to ask questions.

    And, if you have concerns regarding certain items, such items may be treated or addressed in an alternative fashion such that you maintain peace of mind.

    Good luck !

    pjb

  4. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Apr 6 2015 0:32:28
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    I would ask the fumigator about how to deal with the tents and other items. You're thinking along the right lines if you're concerned about densely packed items, but they're the ones to beat advise you. If give them a call on Monday.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  5. P Bello

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Apr 6 2015 7:59:24
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    Fumigation Disaster Story:

    On ABC's Good Morning America this morning a story on a family which was severely harmed as the result of a suspected fumigation at a condo in the US Virgin Islands (St. Johns?) aired. I'm sure you can find it online somewhere.

    Reportedly, the condo beneath theirs had been fumigated the day before with methyl bromide. Note that methyl bromide has been discontinued in the US for a number of years.

    Fumigants are highly dangerous and deadly acute poisons. Their use requires specialized licensing and training. Their labels feature a skull & cross bones for a reason !

    Fumigants may be used safely when all safety precautions and label language is complied with.

    The US EPA is currently involved with the investigation of this situation. Unfortunately, the injury which can result from exposure to this material may be serious. According to the story the family was air lifted to a US based hospital and their two teenage sons (14 & 16 yo ? ) may still be hospitalized.

    While what actually went wrong may be discussed, it is not wise to speculate.

    I've posted this information because it is related to fumigation and this thread.

    Please note the following:

    > It is wise to ask questions of the applicator.

    > The items and areas fumigated must be sufficiently ventilated and cleared prior to re-occupation and re-use.

    > Unfortunately, methyl bromide is colorless and odorless. The applicator adds another "warning" type compound to the gas during application as an added safety measure. The story indicates that the family fell ill within hours of occupying the vacation condo. Mythyl bromide is a dangerous neuro toxin.

    > There is specialized equipment used to detect the presence of fumigant gas for the "clearing process".

    > Note that the product used in this story was methyl bromide which is different that the product currently being used for such treatments in the US today which is sufuryl fluride (sp?) aka Vikane by Dow. There are also "generic" type products which are essentially the same.

    > Be sure to ask as many questions as necessary to adequately address all your concerns.

    Good luck ! pjb

  6. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Apr 6 2015 12:52:06
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    "Reportedly, the condo beneath theirs had been fumigated the day before with methyl bromide."

    Hi Paul,
    I understand the OP is talking about having a moving truck fumigated with Vikane, which is (as you note) a different pesticide, but also a different structural situation (a unit in a condo building).

    I had understood that Vikane/sulfuryl fluoride treatments aren't done to a single unit in a building. Is this incorrect?

  7. P Bello

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Apr 7 2015 2:19:15
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    Hmmm . . . good question.

    When fumigation jobs are down there are a number of basic methods utilized. While we see some homes completely "tented" (i.e they cover the entire house in special tarps) for treatment, in some situations they may choose to rely upon the structural integrity of the building in order to retain the fumigant gas. If so, the crew may only tape/plastic seal the windows and doors as needed.

    Relying upon the structural integrity can be tricky. This can be espeically problematic for abodes sharing a common wall or partition wall, etc.

    We would need to check the product label as well as the regulations to determine this application you've (NBs) asked about would be allowed.

    pjb

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Apr 7 2015 15:14:43
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    Thanks. I understand treating one unit wih Vikane isn't allowed in NYC.


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