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Someone in my building has bedbugs

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  1. Blue_Ox

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Fri May 4 2007 22:32:19
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    but I do not have them yet.
    The building is a 50-unit 6 story pre-war construction coop (with a few rentals) with an elevator. Yesterday when I was in the basement I saw a mattress wrapped in black plastic with a sign saying "bedbugs - do not touch". A big worry is that this trash was inside the building quite near where I and many others have storage units. I also assume the mattress (which may not have been completely wrapped well) was probably dragged through the building and on the elevator.

    I notified the coop board about what I saw and they said they would speak to the super. Today I think I saw the wrapped mattresses outside (without the signs). This is when I became extra concerned because I saw that the corners were not totally sealed.

    My question is: what can I do? Is there any action I can take to NOT get bedbugs in my unit? should I speak to my neighbors on either side of me to let them know what I saw?

    Another complication is that I am a painter and I store some paintings in my apartment and in the storage unit. this is my livelihood and I can't just put my career on hold for 18 months while I wrap the paintings in plastic and wait for the bugs to die. (As far as I know I do not have the bugs yet, but I am projecting).

    Any help? Thanks!

  2. Bugalina

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Fri May 4 2007 23:08:27
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    You should get some chemicals from an online store...doityourownpestcontrol....get some DE and treat your electrical outlets..and pipe chases..get a bellows and puff the de around the entrance to your door...start to caulk as many of the cracks and crevices in your apt. as possible....please read the FAQ's on this blog....I am a believer in preventative measures for these monsters...so get some good caulk..and some de ( you need to follow safetly instructions when using any chemicals )...clear up any unnecessary clutter.....and definitely TALK about this with the coop board....remaining silent is wrong....don't be afraid to confront this...if that mattress was infested, and left near with comprimised wrapping ..that means that the bugs could have easily crawled out from it...and they are making their way to the nearest CO2 warm body they can find.....make certain that when they atttempt to come into you place....its bed bug proofed !!

  3. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Fri May 4 2007 23:55:52
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    if you get bit--you might not feel it and it could take up to 9 days to even get areaction to the bite. Most peopel react sooner but some don't react at all--therefore be proactive!
    A hungry bed bug is easier to see becasue it will comeat you more forcefully--kill it as soon as you see it--if it ever even showsup at all.
    They hate DE buy it ... lay it down thin. and keep any bug as evidence of an infestation--some times youneed that

  4. Blue_Ox

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Fri May 4 2007 23:56:56
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    Is Diatomaceous Earth available at Home Depot?

  5. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Fri May 4 2007 23:59:12
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    I doubt it ox we have links here all around--I'm off to bed now read the faqson isolating your bed, and checking your bed and the area--if you have not yet. I'd say line the inside of your storage with a thin layer of DE to keep them off those canvases.
    chow for now

    willow

  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 5:44:53
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    You should communicate with all your neighbors to asses the extent of the problem and make sure that you all get treated at the same time, ideally with the same methods or quality PCO.

    It is no more possible to treat an apartment in isolation for bed bugs than it is for cockroaches or mice.

    Remember that people may not be experiencing bites and that you should focus on the need for a physical inspection of the surrounding area to the bed.

    Good luck and I hope its still relatively contained.

    David Cain
    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  7. coopbugged

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 6:55:57
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    I would recommend that you speak with the super yourself, as well as the managing agent of your building (if you have one). I did this, and the managing agent and super said they will notify all the other apartments and inspect adjacent apartments (but they have not done so yet).

    It would seem unlikely for the bugs to want to harbor in the paintings in your storage room if there's no warm-blooded body with blood in it down there. But just to be on the safe side, maybe wrap your canvasses in sealed plastic for now? GL!

  8. Blue_Ox

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 9:15:09
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    Thanks for the responses. I have been reading all I can on the matter, and I am confused on one point. If people are not getting bites but do in fact have an infestation, does this mean that one would need to see the actual bug crawling around in order to make the determination? I know you can visually inspect for dark spots (feces) as well but if the bugs are not biting in the apartment, then why would they be producing the black spots?

    Also, I plan to seal up whatever cracks I have with spackle and caulk, but how do I deal with heating vents that seem to have open areas right into the wall area? I was thinking that during the non-heat season I could put clear tape over the entire vent area, but once the heat goes back on I will have to take the tape off.

    I also ordered some de online with some puffers etc. and plan to start talking to some of my neighbors today. I am actually going to begin with the neighbors and the coop borad instead of the super and the management. Since most of us are 'owners' we have more motivation to protect our units than the super and the management (I think). Also because we are owners, the building will not incur much of a financial expense in terms of having to hire PCO's. Owners would be responsible for this ourselves, and there are only about 3 or 4 rental units in the entire building that are rented by the management. The other rentals (probably a handful) are rented by other owners who live in other units in the building.

  9. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 9:27:04
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    Hi,

    The bugs may still be biting but 60% of people may not respond to the bites. The only definitive indications of bed bug infestations are:

    Sightings of the bugs themselves

    Presence of the fecal blood spots

    They will leave the fecal traces if they are feeding. If you all work together and make sure the problem is dealt with at the same time them you stand the greatest chance of complete removal.

    David Cain
    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk

    I agree with the fact that fast action and direct communication will limit the spread even further.

  10. Bugalina

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 9:32:54
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    Blue Ox...I think its good to be proactive...there are varying opinions but logic tells me that I am not going to sit idlely by and wait for them to infest my unit...I am going to do what I can to prevent it.....Some people do not react to the bites....most do, but some do not..this is troubling because without a bite reaction it's harder obviously to know they are around...The black specs are their "poops"..dried blood that they excrete shortly after biting....so finding this is good....keep all evidence in sealed glass jars...also..unknown small blood smears on pillows and sheets....like a little smear...this happens when they withdraw their sucker and leak a little blood...( I think this is why )....Please switch to using ONLY white sheets and pillowcases....As for the duct work...you should definitely seal it off in the months that you are not using it....I liken bed bug treatment to "deforestation"...in other words....if you can clear the space as much as possible, they will be easier to see...and treat...Caulking and spackleing all possible entry ways is a great thing to do...also...Frost King double sided carpet tape is really good for applying around smoke detectors and vents....get the widest possible....and don't buy the generic stuff..get the Frost King...its really sticky...this way you are putting an entire sticky surrounding around any possible openings and hopefully they would get stuck on it or decide not to travel on it....The DE is a good mechanical killer...puff it lightly around baseboards and around the entry to your door...I have to go ....be back later.....I think you have to really read as much as you can and then do what you must...There was just a guy who posted on the Yahoo Group..he lives in an infested home in Long Island...He rents an apt in it....the exterminators have given a quote of nearly 7000.00 dollars to treat !! So you can conclude what you want from this...an once of .prevention is worth a pound of cure....Bed Bug extemination is fast becoming something only the rich can afford...

  11. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 10:29:27
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    hey ox--don't go into the sorage until you have first protected your a[partment.
    Secured as Bugalina describes is not overdone.
    Then i'd have all supplies ready to seal each painting in the sotrage room. Doing it all in one shot--is best, if you can ...

    DE dust the storage room first--before you start wrapping each painting--I'd seal each canvas and I'd evenput a litle puff of DE into the back side of the plastic before sealing--100% tight.
    supplies include a bright light like a flashlignt and extra batteries, all the palstic and tape you could possibly need. A good source of water to drink out of--as hismaytake hoursand hours, Then I'd treat myself as possibly infested when Iwent back into my apartment.

    I'd go directly into the shower with all my clothes on and while the hottest water you can stand is running--I'd disrobe and wash off. If there is some De on the bathroom floor before hand, that's good. Have freshly washed clean clothing very handy (pre-washed. dried and sealed in palstic) that you can put on.
    I'd dry off and get dressed while still in the tub! These bugs can be that stealthy, so that even though this sounds neurotic--it's not.
    take all precautions possible!
    WILLOW

  12. parakeets

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 14:00:17
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    I am not so worried about your being exposed to them when you are in the storage room. (Bedbugs are less likely to hang around an area that doesn't have sleeping bodies. They more likely will seek harborages closer to humans). What I am worried about is that someone in the building obviously has bedbugs. That is far more of a concern than the storage room you are bringing up. Don't worry about the storage room, worry about your bedroom.

    Building management (in most municipalities except San Francisco) do not have to disclose to anyone in the building that someone in the building was treated for bedbugs. So your finding out by seeing the discarded mattress is how most people find out. Your building has bedbugs. If bedbugs are in your building and if the population grows, they will eventually find your body to feed on. If they find you, you will be bitten. If they find you, they will infest your stuff.

    Our building has bedbugs and there was a nearly-new mattress left by our dumpster (I wonder why? It had tell-tale speckles, for one thing!). I put it in writing to my management company, more than once, put signs up on the mattress about bedbugs (it was near the storage room in our building, too). The signs were taken down repeatedly and the mattress was not removed for more than 2 months. At least your management removed the mattress. Obviously they don't want tenants in the buildings to know about bedbugs.

    The fact that the building was treated for bedbugs lowers the value of condos in your building when people go to sell them, if they can be sold at all. (I would never buy a condo that had a history of bedbugs. Would you?) Some towns mandate that the board of heatlh keep records of which buildings were treated for bedbugs. A lawyer I spoke to said often people from the management companies then go into the Board of Heatlh, look at these records, and somehow the records of the building having bedbugs then are "lost" so nothing is on file.

    Beware. The problem is not the storage room. Your building has bedbugs.

  13. S

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 18:06:47
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    Hey Blue Ox,

    I think we should try to put the situation in perspective. Parakeets is right, the problem is less about the storage room and more about the units in your building. And you've come to the right place for advice about bedbugs. But hey - you don't have them yet, and so while you should take preventative measures, you do not need to behave as if you HAVE bedbugs.

    I don't mean to negate others' advice, but some people are suggesting measures as if you already had bedbugs. Some may say it's just a matter of time until you get them, but let's look at some steps you can take, without going overboard, to protect yourself from getting them.

    1. DE. I think in your case, food-grade DE is a great idea. It's often used as a preventative measure, it's relatively safe for humans, and it is said to kill bedbugs on the spot. If bedbugs are in your building, you would be most likely to get them "from the neighbors" (rather than by bringing in an infested item, like a suitcase or chair, as many people do). You can get DE from a number of sources, and Bedbugger.com has an FAQ about it here:

    http://bedbugger.com/2007/03/30/faqde/

    There are two locations where I'd recommend dusting with DE: inside your outlets and along the edges of your rooms. Outlets are a place where bedbugs can enter an apartment from next door. You should unscrew the plates, puff some DE, then screw the plates back on. For the edges of the rooms, same deal, just puff it and try not to step in it/let pets lick it up.

    2. Caulking. I think caulking is the next smart step for you. Again, it's safe, it's a good preventative measure and a good idea all around. Get some caulk and caulk any holes in your walls. You could try using it along the edges of your baseboards, if there are gaps there too. For more on caulking, I'd look at The War on Bed Bugs, a blog written by Frank, who is very resourceful.

    http://waronbedbugs.blogspot.com/

    3. Caution. I'd take caution when entering the storage room in your building. If an infested mattress was sitting in there, Parakeets is right, those bedbugs will not stay there. They will come looking for humans. So they could sorta be anywhere in that room, just wandering around (though you probably won't see any, since they tend to come out in the dark).

    How I'd take caution is just to change my clothes right away, after I get back from the storage room. If you need to go in there, change into old clothes or something, then when you get home, put those clothes right into the wash (and wash/dry on hot). If you can't immediately wash the clothes, bag them in an airtight way. This is the area of your life where I would be most cautious. Treat the clothes as if they have bugs in them. They probably don't, but since there probably aren't people in the storage room that often, the bugs might sense you and come running.

    4. Your neighbors. Talk to your neighbors. Since your building's bedbugs may be traveling from unit to unit, let's think about your adjacent neighbors. How many units touch yours? At the most, it would be four - one on either side, one above and one below. These are the units that would be most likely to spread bedbugs to your unit. Are you friendly with these neighbors? Would it be all right for you to knock on their doors, or perhaps leave them a note to call you? You should make it clear that you don't have bedbugs, but you have heard how bad they can be, and you are aware that they are in the building because you saw the mattress. Find out if these neighbors have bedbugs, and if they've ever heard of them. Ideally, you can get some consensus that something needs to be done, and you and these neighbors can go together to the building management. Which leads me to...

    5. An inspection. Ideally, what would happen is that your building's management (the super? the coop board?) would get together and decide to get the building inspected. Obviously this would be a lot of annoyance for tenants, but basically a PCO (experienced in bedbugs) would inspect every unit in the building. He'd find which units had bedbugs and which did not. He'd treat the infested units and give everybody (infested and not) advice on how to be preventative. Even better, the whole building would arrange to be Vikane'd - this is like tenting for termites, the gas is called Vikane and it kills all bugs and eggs. However, it's obviously expensive so this is the extreme best-case-scenario. The more realistic scenario is that every unit with bedbugs (even if it's just one) is asked to speak up, and a PCO is sent to treat that unit.

    I do believe it's possible to contain, and eradicate, an infestation of one unit in a multi-unit building. (My building has 100 units on 3 floors and - to the best of my knowledge - we kept our bedbugs in our unit and got rid of them all (fingers crossed)).

    Try talking to someone in charge about the options. Disclosure is difficult for everyone, though it will be easier for you since you're not the one with the bugs. (Many of us hesitate to speak up about our bedbugs, for fear of being blamed). You are doing great to be preventative. I think if you can take all of the steps I mentioned, you will be well-equipped to remain safe from bedbugs.

    And, hey. If you do end up getting them, we can always help you with that too.

    No offense, but I hope we never hear from you again!

  14. Jessinchicago

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 20:38:27
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    I just wanted to say that if I knew someone in my building had bedbugs, I would SURE AS HECK take preventative measures. Probably the very first thing I'd do would be protect my bed, and then I'd do most of what's mentioned above. Bugalina is absolutely right- prevention, in this case, is MUCH better than a cure.

  15. Blue_Ox

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sat May 5 2007 20:44:38
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    Thanks for the additional replies. I ordered one pound of d.e. and offered to share it with one of my next door neighbors. I explained the situation to her and told her about inspecting sheets, etc. and that the de can help. She said she would tell some others. I think she has been in the building a long time, plus, she is bilingual (Spanish) which will help with some of the long-time residents who are more comfortable in Spanish.

    Regarding the storage -- it is not one huge room, rather it is kind of professional-looking small rooms of corrugated aluminum from floor to ceiling. So each unit has four 3 aluminum walls, a ceiling, a raised floor and an aluminum door with a lock. There are about 2 rows of 10 small rooms each. While I know that bugs can penetrate pretty much anything (under or between cracks) at least my stuff is not leaning up against anyone else's. Also I seem to be the only one who is ever down there, so if I make quick trips maybe the bugs won't find me.

    After I inspect, I am going to put my small paintings in those xl ziplocks so if there is an invasion at least the paintings will be safe.

  16. Bugalina

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 13:16:43
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    Blue Ox..you can get a hand bellows to apply the DE with...its a really good tool...the XXL And Xl ziplocks are a fantastic tool....just make as sure as possible that you donot make any tears or holes in them....you can buy clear plastic lawn and leaf bags..and put the canvas in one or two of them first and then put them into a XXL ziplock.....when going into your storage unit please be careful...don't wear cuffed pants...I heard from an exterminator that they have found them inside the cuffs after working on a job...this is just hearsay but better to be safe...I just saw a product in Home Depot called Good Night...its a bed bug spray...about 7 or 8 dollars...I have no idea if it works but it couldn't hurt to buy a can and spray around your shoes when walking around the storage units...if someone brings something into the storage unitss that has any bed bugs in it...those bugs are going to hitchhike onto the next unsuspecting warm blooded body....so be careful.....I hate to sound so cynical but having lived through a bed bug infestation is truly a nitemare and I try to tell people to do whatever they can do, within their means, to avoid an infestation...

  17. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 16:48:07
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    this is my concern too bugalina ... people walking past the mattress left in the hallway, or just people going down into other storage cubicles/areas. Blue ox say's she's/he's usually the only one down there--but these bugs can last for months and then "re-activate" or come out of whatever kind if hibernation they go into.
    not to get all personal--but remember folks Blue Ox earns his/her livleyhood from the painting in the storage in order to pay for the living space!
    (look at me withmy 45 canvasses in limbo??? That is no picnic!
    That in itself, would make a good topic? How, when, and why do bed bugs do the "sleep-thing" Any takers?

  18. coopbugged

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 16:55:48
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    I was wondering about that hibernation thing too. I wonder if I'm driving them into hibernation mode by having removed everything from my bedroom except for the aerobed (where they can't reach me) and having had PCO in. Am I just driving them deep into the walls in hibernation for them to come back to consciousness some time many months hence? And has my storage room become a hibernation cave for any who might have randomly ended up there (not in my 18 month sealed bags) and they're ready to rush me whenever I dig around in there and hitch a ride back up to my apt?

    Is it lack of an available meal that causes them to go into hibernation mode, or lack of CO2 being breathed in their presence?

  19. nyjammin

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 18:27:56
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    I was wondering about that too. If we give them no where else to hide, they will find somewhere else in our living quarters to hide. Any little crack or crevice. If we remove all our furniture, would they go into hibernation and then come out of someplace else?

  20. Blue_Ox

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Wed May 9 2007 22:51:22
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    OP here - I've talked to a few other people in my building and besides my next-door neighbor, they seem rather unconcerned about my sighting of the bedbugs sign in the basement taped to the wrapped mattress. I think they believe it's not a real threat -- that it won't happen to them, or perhaps they just don't know how much pain and suffering (financial, emotional etc) bedbugs inflict and how hard they are to get rid of.

    I am going to do what I can to protect my unit and my stuff, but to some degree I don't really feel like I can live 'as if' I have them. My basic plan is to reduce clutter, caulk where I can (though I have hard wood floors with many small spaces between the boards so this might be a losing battle), double wrap any paintings I have completed that I don't need to have out, put white sheets on the bed, seal off my heating vents at least during the summer (not sure what to do in the winter), seal my mattress with a mattress cover, and puff de into the electrical sockets and along the baseboards.

    Hypotethical question for those who do have the bugs: if someone had told you a year ago that bedbugs would try to invade your home (no matter where you lived) sometime within the next 5 years, what would you do differently knowing what you know now?

  21. Bugalina

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Wed May 9 2007 23:26:12
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    I would never let a visitor come into my home with luggage that wasn't plastic bagged and emptied in a bathtub, sprayed with Kleen free..vacummed...dusted lightly with de and all of the contents washed....I "got" my bed bugs from a visitor and her luggage...I would "deforest" my living quarters as much as possible..I would shrink wrap anything I could live without and put it into a clear plastic bin...and mark it..."wait to open until bed bug solution is found"...I would caulk every possible crack and crevice in my apt...If you plan on living there a long time I would buy some oil based polyeurethane and I would fill the floor cracks up with it....I would educate myself as much as possible about bed bugs...I wouldn't have any cloth window treatments...only plastic blinds that can be immersed and washed in a tub...I would spray DE on my doormat entrance...on a regular basis...I would always bring a spray bottle of Kleen Free or bed bug terminator with me when I went down into the storage unit...I would have a good vacumm and use it frequently...I would wash my floors with Murphy' Oil soap with citrus...I would be cleaner than I have to be...and I would learn how to recognize any stage of bed bugs....I might consider a visit to LOU Sorkin of the Nat'l History museum...he has some bed bugs and he is so very helpful...he could show you how they really look eggs, nymphs and adults..this kind of visual is what can help you know what you are looking for..and hopefully never find...I would do everything within my possibility...if you keep your place clear as possible...fill your wall and floor cracks and spray Drione or DE into the necessary places...COVER your bedding....when then you are definitly way ahead of the game..

  22. S

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Wed May 9 2007 23:34:59
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    Hey Blue Ox,

    Great question. Wow, you really made me stop and think.

    Knowing what I know now, I would isolate my bed. If I knew it was a certainty that they would come, but I didn't know when, I wouldn't go nuts with the bed risers and mineral oil and carpet tape. But I would take at least some of the steps to isolate it - mattress covers, for sure (they're very "livable") and vaseline on the bed legs (that's probably the least obtrusive of the "bed leg barriers").

    I'd puff DE into the outlets. I'd caulk the few holes in our walls and maybe even hire someone to seal up our baseboards - they have some holes the way your floors have holes. Do your floors need a good sealing by any chance? I think the person here called Wantmyskinback had her floors like, sealed up professionally - you can ask her more about that.

    But that's pretty much it. I'd declutter, and I might move bedroom furniture a few inches away from my bed if it's currently touching. But still, knowing what I know now, I don't think that I would bag up all my clothes, or even lay down a bunch of chemical. I think I'd do everything that you're doing, pretty much.

    You sound like you've got a good rational head on your shoulders. This is your best weapon. Glad you're taking preventative measures now. Good luck!

  23. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Thu May 10 2007 3:44:21
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    Blue Ox, there's some great advice here. If I knew bedbugs were coming, I'd protect the mattress (we have a FAQ on that with a link to a discount on covers), use some DE (see the DE faq) and familiarize myself with what fecal spots and cast shells might look like. I'd also put out some sticky traps, which won't necessarily net a sample, but won't hurt.

    I think one of the greatest dangers in an infested building is that people will "rescue" discarded stuff if it gets thrown out, even if its labelled. You'd be surprised how many rational people who aren't wanting for money will disregard a sign like that, let alone people who haven't got enough.

    So education may be your best defense. Talk to everyone about the signs and make sure they know everyone does not react to bites. Make sure they know that taking something in, labelled or not, may hide a problem.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  24. wantmyskinback

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Thu May 10 2007 7:00:28
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    I think that your neighbors seem dis interested is for the reason you sited. They don't think it will happen to them. They don't understand the big concern. My kids are like that! Some people live with this attitude that they are impervious to all the tortures of the world. Your neighbors are not educated. It's as simple as that. And superintendents should be educated first, with managing agents...and they should be educating the tenants of all buildings that way.

  25. Blue_Ox

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Sep 30 2007 14:21:11
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    Just an update to this post which I made originally a few months ago. I decided to caulk, protect some of my lesser-used belongings in plastic ziplocs, cover my mattress and pillows with covers from national allergy, throw away my huge down-filled duvets and replace with thinner white or off-white blankets, swtich to plain light-colored sheets and pillowcases, eliminate clutter in general and apply DE.

    In terms of isolating the bed - someone had suggested this- I made a conscious decision NOT to do this, because if the bugs do come to my apartment, I need to know about it right away and call in a PCO. If the bed is isolated, it seems like there is much more chance that if they do come, I won't know about it right away. I am pretty sure that I am allergic, as I believe (in hindsight) that I had a run-in with them in France nearly 8 years ago and I was itchier than I had ever been, with bites all over my torso after sleeping on a couch in an art studio.

    I mentioned this in another post, but there have now been 2 units (out of 50) in my building affected. That I know of!!

  26. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Sep 30 2007 18:45:34
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    Thanks for the update, Blue_Ox. It sounds like you have done well so far. As a preventive measure, DE and mattress/pillow encasements would be high on my list too.

    I agree with you about not isolating the bed. I believe that isolating the bed is a good way to help severely traumatised people sleep in their beds (ie not flee, and remain as bait). But while I feel everyone (even those with no bed bugs) should protect the bed (mattress and pillow) with encasements, I don't think isolating is always a good idea.

    I have been meaning for about 4 months to overhaul the faqs on mattresses to include a fuller discussion of this, and expect to get to it soon. That and the Moving FAQ :-).


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