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Sofa - Treat or trash?

(14 posts)
  1. khan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Apr 29 2009 12:45:25
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    We've scheduled for treatment starting friday and are wondering what to do with our sofa.

    We're in a one bedroom apartment where we think the infestation is near/in the sofa.
    Our bedroom doesn't seem to have a problem, since our bed looks clean (white IKEA mattress, simple frame) and we've never been bitten anywhere.

    Our worry is that after the 1st treatment (we've got three scheduled by our management co's PCO, separated by a week each), we'll scatter the bugs from the sofa to other uninfected areas.

    Our sofa/loveseat is 6 months old at ~$1000 bucks and is upholstered (difficult corner)

    Does it make sense to trash the sofa/loveseat BEFORE the treatment begins or do we try and save it through the three treatments?

  2. spideyjg

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Apr 29 2009 14:19:22
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    Lots of "ifs" but if they were 100%the only infestated items and absolutely no other evidence anywhere else, it is a thought.

    Sofas and such can have oodles of harborage locations and be more difficult to treat.

    Really is a question to pose to the PCO post inspection.

    I know someone who their PCO told them to trash theirs but they have been dealing with them for about a year.

    Jim

  3. khan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Apr 29 2009 14:49:58
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    The PCO is using residuals (gentrol + kicker + cykick + delta dust), but my concern is that they can escape the sofa and move to other locations without "safely" dying .... have there been cases like that where the bugs avoided residuals to reach safety (and other non-infested locations)?

  4. begonebedbugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Apr 29 2009 19:15:54
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    Just my opinion but I wouldnt trash it just yet - unless like the other poster said your PCO thinks you should. If you guys sit on the sofa at night for hours before bed just change before going to bed and after sleeping put on clean clothes again. Constantly wash your clothes in HOT water and try not to move - sit all over the place in the same clothes.

    For me - I'm a stay at home mom and I wouldnt/didnt sit on my furniture all day - I knew the couch had bugs.... at night if I sat there for a few hours before bed I'd just change and put on fresh clean clothes before bed. I constantly washed anything any of us wore on a regualr basis - after it was worn it would go into a ziplock bag and be sealed until I was ready to wash. I think it helped in not spreading the bugs to other areas.

    Thats just my opinion though.... cause what if you toss the couch and the bugs are in the walls and floors? by the time you replace the couch the bugs will just work their way into the new one! See what your PCO thinks! And Good luck!

  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Nov 1 2009 23:50:58
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    Karen14: spam deleted.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  6. BugBoy911

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Nov 8 2009 19:58:13
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    Delta Dust is by far the most effective pesticide your PCO is using. Ask him to dust the sofa, under the sofa, and within the deep cracks and crevices of the sofa. No dust should be visible to the naked eye. Is the sofa leather or fabric? If its leather the chances of bedbugs being within the leather is minimal, they would be more within the interior of the sofa, within the fabric, or were the fabric meets the leather. Sofa must be flipped over and inspected and every inch treated. Dust is a very effective pesticide able to cover tight difficult area's to spray. Spraying I have found is not a very effective weapon compared to dusts. Dusts make it very very difficult for bedbugs to avoid residual pesticides because dusts really dispurse and cover difficult tight areas. Bedbugs can sometimes walk right residual pyrethroids in spray form, but when it comes to dusts there is no excape for bedbugs. It takes time mabye a few days from the point of contact with the dust for death to occur but it will happen. I"m not big on water suspensions anymore when doing bedbug work. BugBoy911

  7. soscared

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Dec 6 2009 15:10:30
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    Hi BugBoy911,
    What do you recommend for cribs? Obviously dusts can't be used there bc of the health issues. My PCO sprayed a mix of chemicals including residuals on the frame, but the baby got bit last night anyway.
    Thank you.

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Dec 6 2009 15:27:31
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    BugBoy911 - 3 weeks ago  » 
    Delta Dust is by far the most effective pesticide your PCO is using. Ask him to dust the sofa, under the sofa, and within the deep cracks and crevices of the sofa.

    Bugboy911,

    Did you ever sit on a sofa that had a lot of dust in it? What happened? Dust bellowed out. You inhaled it.

    I would welcome input from other pest control pros but personally, applying dust to mattresses and the crevices of sofas and upholstered furniture -- where it might billow out -- seems like a bad idea.

  9. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Dec 6 2009 15:30:47
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    khan,

    How do you know you have not been bitten? Many do not react to bed bug bites.
    I agree with asking the PCO about the sofa.

    Also, there was a fellow on here selling a new sofa encasement. We do not have any testing data from an entomologist, but it may work. You can read more here:

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/couch-encasements

  10. bitten123

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Dec 6 2009 18:24:02
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    You have already received some great advice. My advice is only from a non pro, but a previous sufferer. If I had known for sure that one item was the source of my problem, I would have thrown out the sofa in a second. With that said, I ended up not throwing out any of our 3 sofas (actually one sofa and 2 loveseats) and they were all leather. The PCO said that we should do treatments first before we made that decision. They could find no evidence of any infestation in the sofas, but goodness, they are puffy dark brown leather which would be hard to spot. What I did do, was steam the daylights out of them, out of every nook and cranny. We opted for that over the dust as the dust would poof out and my kids already have asthma.... I'm not sure if they were clean to begin with or not, but I steamed them every two weeks for about 6 weeks.

    I feel for you going through this wth a baby/toddler. You might ask your PCO about steaming the bed, at least it is not poisonous to your child and can kill the bugs.

    I hope your treatments knock them out quickly. Hang in there.

  11. mangycur

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Dec 6 2009 20:19:01
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    During my last ordeal, I appeared to be free of bugs for 6 months, and wasn't getting bitten, but then one day I came home and saw a bb crawl out of my sofa. I decided to throw it out after that, because I couldn't figure out how to treat it. It's really a gamble. On the one hand, i threw out a lot of things I later found I didn't need to. On the other hand, it appears bugs were lying dormant in my couch for 6 months without any other bugsign anywhere. I wouldn't have known if I hadn't looked just then. I have been traumatized by this and no longer have a couch. I have mattress encasements, and I sit on the bed to watch tv. I miss my couch, but am too scared to get a new one. Bitten123 gives me hope that there are other options

  12. bait

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Dec 6 2009 21:39:03
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    Remember ABAllen? She/he had thermal twice, and still, bites occurred. She/he burned the couch. All is well.

  13. soscared

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Dec 7 2009 12:58:27
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    Hi Bitten123,
    Thanks for the encouraging words. I am tempted to just throw out the crib, rocking chair, and our bed. But knowing my luck, they'll be in the floor and will infest new things.
    I have a new bite today, and am not happy.
    But I Will wait 2 weeks, hopefully they will die with the aid of the residuals.

  14. btaggart

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Dec 7 2009 16:59:56
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    Nobugsonme - 1 day ago  » 

    BugBoy911 - 3 weeks ago  » 
    Delta Dust is by far the most effective pesticide your PCO is using. Ask him to dust the sofa, under the sofa, and within the deep cracks and crevices of the sofa.

    Bugboy911,
    Did you ever sit on a sofa that had a lot of dust in it? What happened? Dust bellowed out. You inhaled it.
    I would welcome input from other pest control pros but personally, applying dust to mattresses and the crevices of sofas and upholstered furniture -- where it might billow out -- seems like a bad idea.

    good advice nobugs. besides the fact of bed bugs resistance to delta dust. everyone, the labels for all pesticides are available online. if your "bed bug speacialist" which amazes me how many their are now is misapplying you can check by simply reading the label. If you live in some areas the pco is required by law to provide the product label and msds sheets for each pesticide being used dont be afraid to ask for it. If you are dealing with a reputable company they will have absolutley no problem with providing this info. If your pco says he doesnt have the labels or wont give them to you this is a warning sign to find someone else. If they mis apply question them or the company management. Just my opinion.

    brian


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