Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Detection / Identification of bed bugs

Since it's such a big problem, why does the government not do anything about it?

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  1. John

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 3:06:10
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    Since bed bugs has become such a wide spread problem in the USA, it's affecting many people's life, why does the government not do anything about it?

    The way I see it is,

    1) Although bed bugs bite people and suck blood, so far there's no indication it links to any transmittable disease. And since it wouldn't kill people, government does not concern too much.

    2) In fact, I suspect that government is happy about it and wants it to stay for the economic reason. Bed bugs treatment and prevention has become such a huge industry and is making tons of tax money for the government that they didn't have before.

    In the mean time, beg bugs is such a good news for the furniture industry as well. Life time warranty for mattress? Who's gonna need it now? Just think about how many otherwise perfectly fine mattresses that have been thrown away and replaced every year due to bed bugs? Not too say many other furniture like bed, couch, carpet!! Furniture industry love bed bugs! They are probably laughing now counting all the extra money they made because of bed bugs.

    And the laundry mat, how many extra cloths and bedding people are washing every year due to bed bugs?

    Clothing industry, how many clothes were thrown away every year because of bed bugs?

    Therapist, how many people have to go see therapist due to the mental stress from having bed bugs?

    See, bed bugs have generate enormous amount of economic benefit to the country and no wonder the government is not doing anything to try to eliminate it again as they had done years ago!

    I am curious if anyone actually have a number how much economic benefit in total is related to bed bugs.

    I know some of the things I said might not be 100% politically correct but I am just venting and frustrating.

    Bed bugs have affected out life so much besides the bites, it affected the way we travel and enjoy life, affects the way we accept guest to our house, it affects our friendship and even relationship. Something heavy handed needs to be done about it!!

  2. ITortureBugs4Revenge

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 4:51:08
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    I totally agree with the 2nd reason, that bed bugs are now a huge economic windfall for the government because bbs have reached such epidemic proportions in the U.S. as of late, and fighting the little bastards is something people spend lots of money on. It couldn't really be because bbs don't carry diseases, as cockroaches are known carriers of several diseases and the government does nothing about them either, as cockroaches are another scourge that the American people spend massive amounts of their money on, hiring exterminators as well as buying over the counter insecticides in huge quantities. Vermin are good for the economy, as it keeps existing pest control companies in business as well as new businesses starting up that now specialize only in controlling certain types of vermin. The government isn't stupid when it comes to making money and it will do a lot of shady shit for a buck.

    .....I am NOT an expert.....

    Any advice i give here is based solely on my own personal experiences in dealing with bedbugs & other household vermin.
  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 9:22:31
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    Hi,

    I hear you, sadly those in politics are not listening closely enough to the people or not enough are asking loudly enough yet.

    The only way to get this on the political agenda is to remind them who votes for them to have the expense accounts and tell your elected representatives that you want to see this on the political agenda.

    There are solutions that they could access and role out if they just chose to listen and they would not be at massive cost to people, the economy or the environment.

    If you are interested in trying to resolve the issue please let me know.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  4. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 10:19:04
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    Dear Folks,

    I thought we already beat the legs off this horse however, there are many reasons we don't see "the government" directly involved with the overall bed bug effort, some of which include:

    > Limited resources which must be allocated to many needs and projects.

    > Bed bugs are not considered a major public health threat as are mosquitoes and other disease vector type pests.

    > The total number of individuals who are affected by bed bugs is likely less as a percentage of the total population than it may seem to those who have been affected by bed bugs.

    > Note that we have seen some "government involvement" with the bed bug issue but this has mostly been in the form of codifications and regulations regarding bed bug infestations, how they are handled and dealings between bed bug victims, landlords, property managers, etc. rather than control methodologies.

    > Note that there are certain grant monies awarded to applicants for beneficial public education and research projects however, such fund are limited.

    > It is likely incorrect at best to assert:

    a) That the government is "not too concerned". I deal with HD officials on a regular basis and each expresses frustration over the bed bug issues that arise in their jurisdiction while also underscoring the fact that they are underfunded as well as unable to address these issues, due to current regulations, adequately.

    b) To state that "the government is happy" about bed bugs for any reason. Note that "the government" is not an all knowing or all feeling entity that is capable of maintaining a uniform feeling or belief. The government is made up of numerous individuals who hold certain jobs, duties and responsibilities. For such to be true would require an "across the board" type agreement to such thoughts which would essentially be a broad spectrum bed bug conspiracy. For this to be so is illogical and rather fantastic.

    > Currently, we are best served to help ourselves whilst also doing our best to "spread the word" and provide public education to raise awareness.

    > Note that even the current news media does not air many bed bug stories any more. The media has a short memory and seems to adopt a "been there done that" type attitude where bed bugs are concerned recently.

    Hope this helps ! PAUL B.

  5. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 10:49:27
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    Hi Paul,

    There are a lot of areas that people could ask for better government help with such as communication of the key facts on avoidance and ID.

    Although these could come from the industry or public health boards it has been far from universal and comprehensive. We often get either incomplete information sites or in some cases out right incorrect information perpetuating.

    If people feel that is critical enough to ask their political representatives for them to rectify I can't see anything wrong with it. But it will take lots of people asking or more accurately making it clear its a "voting issue" for them.

    Politically there is a lot of good that could be brought to the industry in terms of tax breaks for adoption of green methods aside from the obvious early confirmation making cases easier to treat.

    David

  6. John

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 12:47:34
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    Hi Paul,

    "b) To state that "the government is happy" about bed bugs for any reason. Note that "the government" is not an all knowing or all feeling entity that is capable of maintaining a uniform feeling or belief. The government is made up of numerous individuals who hold certain jobs, duties and responsibilities. For such to be true would require an "across the board" type agreement to such thoughts which would essentially be a broad spectrum bed bug conspiracy. For this to be so is illogical and rather fantastic."

    I was already aware that I was not being politically correct and I have indicated that on my post. Your above common really just seems like picking on the words I am using rather than focusing on the real issue and idea I was trying to pursue and it seems to be a bit uncalled for. And if " the government" consider bed bug as a serious enough issue, they will have a unified voice and feeling about the issue.

    It may not be a health issue in terms of transmittable disease. I have had roaches and got bit by mosquitoes in the past. However, the mental stress bed bug brings is 10, 50, 100 times worse than that and some people seem not to understand that or choose not to. ( I am not saying you Paul)

    I can understand we will have a different point of view in this issue as me being a bed bug victim and you being a bed bug management consultant.

  7. Emm

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 21:26:35
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    As a government employee who flushed a month's income down the toilet dealing with bed bugs, I care. But I also recognize that outside of cases in federal low income housing, it's not the government's job to fix this problem. Yes the mental effects suck, but so do other things. The government steps in when the private sector fails to AND when the problem is widespread enough. David's point about awareness is a good one, and I could see a role there...but that's about it right now outside of basic reasearch (like this). If negative mental health issues related to bed bugs become as common as other issues such as combat related PTSD, obesity, and drug addiction, or if they begin transmitting disease, the government may choose to step in. But right now, those things aren't happening.

    I can sympathize with your desire to get help and find a solution. During my fight with the bed bugs, I wanted nothing more than someone to come in, tell me they'd fix my problem and everything would be ok. But no one did, and I had to eat ramen for 4 months and put off a major surgery to deal with them. But it worked, and thanks to Obamacare's mental health parity clause (yay government!), I saw a therapist for my anxiety.

    And I can guarantee you that no one in the public health field is looking at the federal income taxes levied on pest control companies when they choose not to research bed bugs...heck, I don't even know if that data exists in a usable format.

  8. John

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 22:19:02
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    Just a funny thought. Back 100 years ago which I didn't exist then when almost every family had bed bug like a house pet. Were people actually happier since they didn't have to hide the fact that they had bed bugs? Just picture this, a few people sitting in the living room and looking at bed bugs crawling around and one said" hey, look, your bed bugs look yellow, mine are actually black, how cute!" ......But seriously, I think things would probably only get better when bed bugs are in every family like 100 years ago.

  9. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jan 2 2014 23:24:49
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    David Cain and some of the other experts know about the historical issues.

    I'm not sure if that's how it was treated. I remember my very elderly relatives, born in 1900 or earlier and gone for years...talking about how only dirty people had bedbugs.

    They
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  10. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jan 3 2014 9:30:12
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    I can hope there will be some sort of unified fight or national persuasion toward alleviating this debilitating and overwhelming problem of getting these bugsters out of our lives. They disrupted mine to the point of hopelessness at times and it is very hard to try and live a "normal" existence. I wish someone could come and help us and follow all the proper steps recommended ;by the professionals. In my area of the country, most people don't want to work with them and if they do, it's only to get in and out for a large fee, with one at most follow up. No instruction or directions for how to monitor.

    We need some kind of guidelines in place for the pest control companies so that no matter where you live, you can have professional, effective treatment to rid your life of this nightmare. But how to have that implemented is the $64,000,000 question.

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jan 3 2014 10:11:52
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    Hi Daylight,

    You may want to look at the Australian and European codes of best practice.

    They were written as cross party consultation documents in an open source type format which means they stand firmly on a consumer advocacy perspective.

    The Australian one has been around for longer than the European one but its growing in popularity as the problem progresses.

    There is a US trade association code of best practice but it is basically internally produced and does not have the same consumer slant.

    Lobbying for a more consumer representative set of standards would appear to be a very worthy cause. I don't think it will immediately change the work ethic of those doing the work but it will most likely enhance quality through a set of accountable standards.

    I have worked in the past in roles where industry standards were set so if you want some pointers on Skype let me know.

    David

  12. BigDummy

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jan 3 2014 12:21:44
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    John - 13 hours ago  » 
    ......But seriously, I think things would probably only get better when bed bugs are in every family like 100 years ago.

    Yeah, I'm sure bed bugs woulda been a walk in the park compared to things like Polio, the Spanish Flu or even a simple infection. Weird how things change, eh?

  13. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jan 3 2014 19:17:49
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    Thanks for the feedback, David. I'm not in a position to take on that challenge, but I believe some sort of system with accountability would be helpful. Maybe offering bonuses or stipends for those companies who follow standards developed by representatives such as experts, professionals, consumers, and including input from experienced technicians and others in the field, would encourage more ownership and motivation to perform at high levels.
    We need some very sensitive officials to feel enough empathy for us to be on board and fight for funding and proper treatment. (Maybe we could get someone like Warren Buffet or Bill and Melinda Gates to champion our cause).
    I will check out the Australian and European codes. People need to have concern and care for others' miseries. It would be great to have some dependable help available for those who find themselves suffering from these vampire squatters. I feel like we are lost in the limbo between the good times of no bedbug worries and somewhere in the future where there may be some kind of relief through scientific progress or a cautious return of some good old powerful insecticide (as green as could be though).

  14. ITortureBugs4Revenge

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jan 3 2014 20:00:31
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    Once in a while the thought crosses my mind that this current bed bug scourge in the USA is the result of terrorism, as bed bugs are not really dangerous in the sense of carrying deadly diseases or killing people (Perfectly safe for the terrorists to handle) but they do cause great psychological distress, tear families apart, and no doubt cause people to miss work or even lose their jobs completely, thus causing problems with the economy. I know it sounds far fetched, but it does make sense when one thinks about it.

  15. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jan 3 2014 20:28:01
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    I get where you're coming from with that. A bit out there, but hey, anything's possible. Just random acts of meanness=terror for some. It's probably not terrorism, but the problem certainly creates terror for those stricken. I thought I couldn't stand snakes until I woke up to this.

    Even though they say that bbs are increasingly infesting us, most people are not really aware of them or their implications. They are still a taboo topic in most places. How to share information and make others more aware is a problem.

  16. ITortureBugs4Revenge

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jan 4 2014 4:01:28
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    Of course one of the big problems with bed bugs is the ignorance the news media in reporting the issue and therefore no advice is given to the general public through their TVs (By far the best way to get the public's attention) on what an increasingly pervasive problem bbs have recently become in this country as well as no expert advice being given on how to prevent bringing bbs into the home, unlike how the news media drills the threat of the flu and its prevention through flu shots into the general public. I know, bbs are not considered a serious disease like influenza is, but the psychological trauma they inflict on their victims, the related deterioration of the victim's quality of life, as well as suicides related to bbs certainly justifies them being talked about much more than they are...besides the occasional and very brief reports on the news about 5 star motels in Vegas having to temporarily close their doors because of bed bugs, or tenants of infested slum apartment buildings ending up out on the street.

  17. Bedbugloco

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jan 4 2014 9:31:59
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    They don't spread diseases and it makes people spend every single dollar to kill them, which benefit the government. This government is money driven from people's pain.

  18. Mairead27

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    Sat Jan 4 2014 11:35:58
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    I don't know what the federal government can do for the USA altogether, but here in NYC, I'm wondering what the new mayor, Bill DeBlasio, will do about this.

    While the City already has some good regulations and laws regarding landlords, I'd like to see DeBlasio go further. As the former public advocate, he had an annual list of the worst landlords in NYC. He also keeps talking about how NYC is divided when it comes to class, and its well known lower-income people struggle with bedbugs more than rich people. I don't know what he can do, and if he has any ideas, but with his background and political stance, I hope he takes more action to help New Yorkers with this problem.

  19. BugginOutCNJ

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jan 4 2014 12:46:53
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    I'm new to this so I don't know if there is any such thing out there, but there needs to be public service announcements to dispel the stigma of bed bugs coming from uncleanliness and lower class. I'm more than sure that MANY infestations go unreported out of fears of evictions and being judged by others, and the epidemic is MUCH more widespread than the average person perceives. Many people believe "It will never happen to me."

  20. John

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    Sat Jan 4 2014 13:07:03
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    Daylight, I am really sorry to hear your situation and sympathize with it. It's not normal what we have to go through to deal with it economically and mentally and it's not a situation one individual should be put upon.

    I think if you really can't get any proper help from the exterminator you probably should try some home remedy like DE and look up the internet. There are some victims posted their experience dealing with bed bugs and some of them had succeeded by doing it themselves. Either way, I don't feel we can completely rely on exterminator anyways. It requires constant monitor ourselves after the treatment and proactive action if the problem still persists.

    And I agree, it's really hard to find a good industry professional. As you can see, some was even upset I wrote an article like this, that's just low.

    If you want, I think you might be able to create a new post with exactly what your situation is and I am sure many other people on this site will be happy to provide their suggestions to you.

    David, I really appreciate your help and suggestion to potentially lobbying. It would be great if it does happen. In the meantime, I am not hopeful. I think the problem will need to get much worse before the government take action. Although I think it's bad enough, I was reading something said 1/3 of the hotel in my city need treatment. Just imaging how many unknowing guests go through those hotels everyday.

    Talking about lobbying, just being funny, imaging we gather a couple people who may or may not carry bed bugs marching into congress or white house. I guarantee they will pass the bill immediately because now it's a real problem for THEM!

  21. bed-bugscouk

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    Sat Jan 4 2014 13:13:03
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    Hi,

    I did hear a rumor that 1600 Penn Ave has already been treated and I know for certain similar high profile type places in London has already been worked on.

    I am really pleased to see so many people vocalise the issue in a positive society helping society fashion and yes it is hard to get grass roots individual lobbying up and running but that is never going to be an acceptable reason not to try.

    I am going to start an activism thread to centralise ideas and discussion in the hope that it can become a green sticky and that good things will come from it.

    David

  22. John

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jan 4 2014 13:26:54
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    Hi David,

    I am all for it. I will support you 100%! I just don't think we should live a life like this! I am thinking about starting a new thread letting people sharing the emotional and psychological trauma they had to go through.

  23. bed-bugscouk

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    Sat Jan 4 2014 13:34:08
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    Hi John,

    I 100% agree with you.

    I have seen some things that has made my ashamed of society but have thankfully also had clients who know when I have that tone in my voice the issue needs to be resolved and as quickly as possible.

    I understand what you are thinking about an emotional cathartic release my only caution is that sometimes it fuels the negative aspects of bedbugs and draws people into the worst side of things that is very much a down hill spiral.

    It may initially seem harsh but at times I have to tell people its time to go and spend 5 minutes sitting in the bathroom to have a good cry, to get it out of your system and release the emotional build up so that in 5 minutes we can start tackling the physical issue. I often refer to it as "popping" because people need to get it out and off their shoulders so they can focus better at the task in hand. Its a fine line to walk and thankfully I don't get it wrong often but 10% of the time people only realise the benefit and reasoning behind it weeks later.

    David

  24. Daylight

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    Sat Jan 4 2014 14:31:02
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    Thank you John for your kind words. I am learning to deal with my situation without anti anxiety and anti depression meds since they make me too ill to function. This site has been an inspiration to me. I am trying to soak up all the good ideas and apply them where needed.

    At times I felt like I was going to have to call in the National Guard or something to help me if the exterminators can't get them. Then, I was told by someone close to me that it's better to not say a word about our problem and that no one wants to hear about it anyway. I say tell everyone, especially friends, relatives, and others close to you and maybe there would be a greater demand proper for treatment and eradication of this menace to society.

    If society were to realize the full extent of the menace, it might help to open more dialogue and progress. It can happen to anyone. After all, it happened to us, didn't it!

    I am refreshed by the advice and suggestions offered by all on this site. It's great that regulars and experts alike are using their time, knowledge, experience, and compassion to bring us hope and show us how to battle the enemy. This is an exciting time in some ways. I will be so relieved when my ordeal is over, but there will be other avenues to pursue in the winning of this war.

  25. John

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jan 4 2014 14:50:28
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    Daylight, I hate to say this. But if you have not told anyone yet. I would be really really careful before I told anyone, specially your friends and family about your situation. I told some friends when I had it a few years ago and boy I can tell you some of them ran away faster than a rabbit and hid away better than a bedbug and were friends no more. So I will say take precaution not to affect anyone but don't tell anyone for your own good and their benefit( since its effect is so largely emotional, why would you want to stress them if you didn't have to).

    However, if you were just saying tell your friends and family in general about bed bugs and bring awareness to it, I think it's a great idea. With education, not only people will have less fear about the situation and the person who has it doesn't feel so isolated, it can also help reduce the transmission by everyone taking the right steps to protect themselves and others.

  26. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jan 4 2014 20:59:57
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    Some additional comments for your review and consideration:

    > Please note that my comments and position on this issue is actually in agreement with many points above however, my comments are underscoring the practicality and the reality of the current situation. I'm presenting reasons why we're not seeing a visible government bed bug effort which is more direct and discernible by the general public. This does NOT mean that I am totally against such a thing however, I do know there are many issues to be considered with the most significant issue being the allocation of limited resources over many deserving projects.

    This said, let's also consider the government's role and what "the government" is actually doing already before we believe that they're not doing enough or doing nothing:

    (Firstly, I'd ask; which government entity and at what level thereof are you asking about?)

    > The EPA is a Federal Agency; these folks are involved in the registration of pesticide products used for bed bug control. They also underwrite and provide grants for research and other worthy projects regarding bed bugs.

    > The CDC, a Federal entity; the Communicable Disease Center conducts research and disseminates viable information regarding many pests including bed bugs. They also conduct research on a variety of pests related to health concerns. It is the CDC which is one of the most significant influential entities that participates in the decision process which determines if a pest such as bed bugs is an actual public health pest or not.

    > Local State & County Health Departments: These folks investigate bed bug complaints against landlords, hotels, motels, boarding schools and other such places. Their field investigators may write citations and require pest remediation for violators. They also provide credible information to the public.

    > Land Grant Universities: These State universities conduct research, provide county extension entomologists, consult with local government, participate in Industry training and serve for the benefit and welfare of their State's citizens. They also provide credible website information for the general public. State Universities that are well known in the pest and bed bug arena include but are not limited to: Cornell, Univ of Kentucky, Univ of Florida, Rutgers, Purdue, Texas A & M, Univ of Cal Riverside, Ohio State, Univ of Tennessee, Auburn, Nebraska, Minnesota, Univ of Maryland, Virginia Tech, Pennsylvania State, Univ of Arkansas and others.

    Please note that I've listed 15 such organizations which each have Departments of Entomology staffed by excellent, credible and well respected research scientists who each have a number of graduate students and advanced degree candidates conducting research related to pests, bed bugs and their control.

    Further, each such university has an "extension program" that id in place to assist the State's citizens with their pest related issues by providing suitable information and recommendations.

    For example, did you know that the Extension Agent in your county office can be called upon to properly identify insect and other pests? This service is provided for free to all. hese folks will also provide advice on pest control issues as well.

    The DOD and USA: The Department of Defense and the US Army composed an excellent bed bug reference and treatment booklet. This information was available online for free. Harvard University Department of Entomology also had an excellent reference booklet on bed bugs as well.

    > Local Governments: In the recent years we have seen local governments get involved with the bed bug issue in response to communications from concerned citizens, media coverage, etc. We've seen codifications, laws and regulations fast tracked in response to local need. Cities and States have acted in regard to bed bug issues.

    On the "Private Sector" side there has been significant bed bug related effort expended as well:

    > The NPMA is the National Pest Management Association. This is the professional association which represents the pest management industry in the US. NPMA formed a bed bug task force committee which was staffed by many credible and well respected industry members. These folks composed the NPMA Bed Bug Best Practices document. Those interested may wish to visit the NPMA website to review this document. NPMA and its members are also involved at various levels and locals regarding the bed bug issue.

    > Nearly ALL US States have their own State Professional Association and some states have multiple associations. Some cities also have a professional association within such states. These Associations have education and specialized bed bug committees as well. They provide effort regarding the bed bug issue, provide support for university research and also work with local government agencies.

    Having been an active Industry member here in the US since 1976 with exposure and experience at various levels within the Industry my experience, knowledge and observation provides me with first hand knowledge of much of what is happening within the US professional pest management industry that most folks simply do not or would not know. Simply stated, there is more that is going on that meets the eye.

    Is "the Government" doing something about bed bugs? Yes.

    Is it happening fast enough to help today's bed bug victims directly? No.

    Are we going to see Government financial assistance for bed bug victims to help them pay for or provide bed bug remediation work? In my opinion, not in the foreseeable future. And, I've detailed may of the reasons for this previously.

    Is increased public awareness needed? Yes.

    Can we get help from others beyond the Government? Probably but it will take some effort.

    Hope this helps and please fight the good fight ! paul b.

  27. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jan 4 2014 21:29:04
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    Oh yeas, one more question/point:

    The headline of this thread states:

    "Since it's such a big problem . . ."

    Please advise on the following:

    > How are you defining "big"?
    > Who says it's a "big problem"?
    > What data supports this?
    > Do you know the percentage of US households that have a bed bug problem?
    > The percentage of all US apartment units?
    > The percentage of all US hotel rooms?
    > The percentage of all US single family homes?
    > The percentage of all US Citizens who have been bitten by bed bugs?

    Is it possible that those who participate here on the BBRF or who have experienced a bed bug problem are being myopic?

    Is it possible that perhaps we are biased where bed bugs are concerned?

    Consider this, what if these percentages were actually rather small in comparison?

    What if these percentages were so small that an increased Government effort was not warranted?

    I'm just asking basic questions here folks. pjb

  28. ickypillow

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 4:01:03
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    > Do you know the percentage of US households that have a bed bug problem?
    > The percentage of all US apartment units?
    > The percentage of all US hotel rooms?
    > The percentage of all US single family homes?

    These are GREAT questions--does anyone actually know the answers? The media loves using words like "epidemic" and "rampant" to describe the BB problem in the U.S. . . . but is it, really?

  29. P Bello

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 9:05:15
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    Dear icky,

    Thanks for your comments !

    Another note that is apropos for this morning:

    > The news is reporting local temperatures below zero here in Atlanta on Tuesday morning. These would be record setting low temperatures for Atlanta and the area will see a predicted number of fatalities associated with the freezing temperatures. Such deaths are usually related to the following: the elderly, the homeless and those "Darwin Award Winners" that burn their own homes down or succumb to carbon monoxide while sleeping using portable fuel fired heaters inappropriately.

    NOW, here's the question:

    Should the Local Government (i.e. the City of Atlanta agencies and multiple County Health Departments) gird themselves for the oncoming deep freeze or divert those funds and resources for bed bug control ?

    Let's not all forget this fundamental significant factor:
    The allocation of limited resources over multiple worthy needs is what government officials must do on a daily basis.

    In fact, each of us do this every day as well ! (i.e. Do I pay my mortgage or buy a new car instead? Do I get my hair done of visit the doctor ? Do I get a new cell phone or pay my rent? Do I go out for dinner or save money buy preparing meals myself ? )

    The fundamental concept is easily understood on many levels.

    Now, let's apply the logic of this to the original question posed:

    Even the Grinch learned that perhaps, just perhaps; (when Dr. Seuss wrote)

    “And the Grinch, with his Grinch-feet ice cold in the snow,
    stood puzzling and puzzling, how could it be so? It came without ribbons. It came without tags. It came without packages, boxes or bags. And he puzzled and puzzled 'till his puzzler was sore. Then the Grinch thought of something he hadn't before. What if Christmas, he thought, doesn't come from a store. What if Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more.”
    ― Dr. Seuss, How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

    As stated above these government agencies are allocating limited resources over multiple needs and those that are most important get the funding while others do not.

    As such, it is obvious that the bed bug issue does not fall within those identified lists of priorities for these Agencies and there is likely little that can be done to change this.

    Now, this could be just my opinion or actually true, I really don't know for sure however, I do wonder how many of those who have commented on this issue have actually worked alongside and or met with US Federal, State, City, County and Other Local Government Officials regarding the bed bug issue. Please raise your hand if you have, thanks. And those who have served on any US Trade Association committees, please raise your hands, thanks. And those who have worked closely with any Housing Authorities regarding the bed bug issue please raise your hands, thanks. And those who have worked with Health Departments. And those who have worked with Medical Associations. etc. etc. etc.

    There's certainly a lot going on behind the scenes folks.

    Even though this may seem like a simple issue, its not.

    And the answer goes back to the fundamental concept stated numerous times previously.

    Note that even State Governors have petitioned the Federal Government here in the US regarding this issue.

    And Trade Association committee members have visited with numerous elected officials numerous times regarding this issue already.

    Now suppose you're sitting with a Congressional aide or even the Congressman him/herself to relate the pertinent issues related to bed bugs in their Congressional District, when the very next appointment represents a larger issue to more constituents it's likely that the bed bug issue falls off the table of consideration.

    Doesn't mean that we should give up the good fight but be realistic.

    This isn't Gettysburg and we need not waste our efforts on another Pickett's charge.

    What we do need is to fight the fight where our efforts will do the most good and in my view here's what may be most effective:

    > Firstly, continue to help bed bug victims who are being bitten on a daily/nightly basis. This is the most important and urgent need, to help prevent people from being bitten tonight.

    > Increase public awareness about bed bugs such that folks learn how to prevent, detect and control bed bugs.

    > Form a nationwide/international consortium of bed bug victims, advocates and other interested parties. This consortium should be formed with a suitable mission statement that is adhered to and serves for the benefit of the general public over the interests of any commercial entity that would profit from the bed bug issue. This consortium would need to be a US legal 501c3 type not for profit type organization that is capable of accepting donations on a tax benefit basis for those who provide financial support. This consortium would need to retain a suitable lobbyist, public relations firm, marketing & communications firm and advocate and other key staff positions in order to compose and deliver the proper and suitable message points to the general public and government officials alike. This consortium could also provide funding for bed bug victim relief on an as needed basis. And, this consortium could seek funding from suitable existing philanthropic individuals and organizations.

    Just a few thoughts for you to consider over Sunday morning coffee.

    Have a nice day ! paul b.

  30. RaccoonEyes

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 10:12:14
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    Short of busting down the doors of everyone's homes and gassing them there isn't much they can do. There are how many millions of people with other problems?
    Unfortunately I'm noticing a bad pattern here.
    -Not everyone knows about bed bugs
    -People who know about bed bugs and have never had them don't think of it as a big deal
    -People who know about them and have them, but don't care
    -People who know about bed bugs can be affected by severe depression or anxiety- and those with those problems- amplify it by about a bazillion.

    And unfortunately the solution complication to such patterns are as followed-
    To raise awareness for bedbugs a lot of funding would cost an arm and a leg. A legitimate company would need to get funding by the government for Public Service Announcements, they would pay for people to -make- the Public Service Announcement, and they would have to decide who their target audience is- which may even cost a bit more if they want Wolverine fighting a bed bug mutant or something, or just cheap out and use a fat cartoon bug.. Either way they would have to pay for the animation, pay the voice actor(s). Then they would have to send it back to the government for approval then they broadcast it. (I am fast forwarding all the back and fourth steps).
    The end result for the PSA is something like these, (lol a couple I grew up with here in Canadaland)

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Flash Video
    [+] Embed the videoGet the Flash Video

    Or if they wish to go to schools to explain to kids. They have to find people who aren't criminals preferably, find people who are kid/youth friendly, determine what content they want to explain in full detail or what won't traumatize a 4th grader. Then they may wanna show the Wolverine PSA or Fat bug PSA during that presentation. But first the actors/presenters have to get paid, they have to pay for the use of the PSAs, pay for the actor's equipment, ad pay for the actor's transportation.

    People who know about bed bugs but don't think they are a big deal need to be sat down and explained by someone they know who -has- had them rather than an equivalent of Smokie the Bear on TV. Since they don't think it's a big deal they only make the problem worse by possibly spreading them to others. People are generally more inclined to listen to someone they have spoken to personally and they would accept the information a bit more if it was someone they trust- even a well known PCO in the area.

    In any case in BC and I'm sure many other parts of North America we have our heads turned elsewhere- floods, blizzards, power outages, homeless, meth addicts, animal abuse, etc. Bed bugs are the least of their concerns right now. In the 2000's I remember Mosquito PSA's but that was only because of a West Nile disease outbreak. If more people severely reacted to the Bed Bug bites (I mean hospitalized, not just inconvenienced for a few days with an itch) then I'm sure a couple PSA's with precautions would be tossed around but really, that's all they can do.

    The government is too busy making sure there's electricity, clean water, and that people are being fed. One PCO told me it costs $900 per suite for K9 and heat treatment. Just to ballpark based off that bit- just to do three suites that's $2700 dollars, 10 suites is $90000, and so fourth. If a city is heavily affected... we would need a whole new tax for it.. and y'all know how voters are with more taxes...

    Anyway that's my 5 am two cents.

  31. John

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 14:58:08
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    Paul,

    You note,

    "> How are you defining "big"?
    > Who says it's a "big problem"?
    > What data supports this?
    > Do you know the percentage of US households that have a bed bug problem?
    > The percentage of all US apartment units?
    > The percentage of all US hotel rooms?
    > The percentage of all US single family homes?
    > The percentage of all US Citizens who have been bitten by bed bugs?
    Is it possible that those who participate here on the BBRF or who have experienced a bed bug problem are being myopic?"

    Every time I am reading your long posts I just can't help but noticing the little advertisement from you on the right side of the screen says : Paul Bello, the bed bug combat manual, $53.95, free shipping!" And I just couldn't help but laughing.

    Since you are an expert, why don't you answer above questions yourself?

    A lot of us who post here are victims of bed bugs, we had never claimed that we were the experts or we had contacts with government agencies as you do. However, if it wasn't for all these victims, this forum would have just become a pure commercial and advertising website and it would have been against the purpose of the site which is to help bed bug victims. For an industry practitioner like yourself to spend so much time writing articles condescendingly against our bed bug victims, it just seems to be insensitive, pointless and unhelpful. If it wasn't for bed bug victims that you are trying to talk down to, who is going to buy the little book you try to promote?

    We apparently don't have so much time as you do, besides coping with bed bugs, most of us all have other professions we have to purpose and I am sure in which we would have a lot more knowledge than you do. Reading these long posts you have written here, besides it's long, I still don't see you get the point besides you are not happy we try to pursue further action from " the government".

    We are ok people try to promote their products and services here. However, unfortunately, some of them have good intention and some don't. And we can see that.

  32. KillerQueen

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Jan 5 2014 15:08:31
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    John - I think/know you're taking Paul's questioning the wrong way.

    Regards,
    John Furman
    Boot A Pest, Inc.
    New York's "Best Bed Bug Exterminator" NY Magazine

  33. John

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 15:18:06
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    John ( Furman),

    You probably wouldn't think that if you start reading the first post by me and the first post by Paul in this thread.

    Best,

    John

  34. KillerQueen

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 15:22:33
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    Hi John,

    Before I comment I just have 1 question if you don't mind. Do you live in an apartment or a house?

  35. P Bello

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 18:04:55
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    John,

    Above you wrote:

    "Since you are an expert, why don't you answer above questions yourself?

    A lot of us who post here are victims of bed bugs, we had never claimed that we were the experts or we had contacts with government agencies as you do. However, if it wasn't for all these victims, this forum would have just become a pure commercial and advertising website and it would have been against the purpose of the site which is to help bed bug victims. For an industry practitioner like yourself to spend so much time writing articles condescendingly against our bed bug victims, it just seems to be insensitive, pointless and unhelpful. If it wasn't for bed bug victims that you are trying to talk down to, who is going to buy the little book you try to promote?"

    You also wrote:

    "We apparently don't have so much time as you do, besides coping with bed bugs, most of us all have other professions we have to purpose and I am sure in which we would have a lot more knowledge than you do. Reading these long posts you have written here, besides it's long, I still don't see you get the point besides you are not happy we try to pursue further action from " the government".

    We are ok people try to promote their products and services here. However, unfortunately, some of them have good intention and some don't. And we can see that. "

    As KQ points out above, you're taking my comments wrong !

    > Firstly, my book is intended for professionals and NOT bed bug victims.

    > Please note that it is not me who promotes my book here but a retail seller of the book.

    > If you're in New York, I've donated copies of my bed bug book to the NY Public Library such that bed bug victims there can access it for free if need be.

    > You need to understand that my intention is to provide viable, credible and accurate information to bed bug victims who seek such assistance on the BBRF on a regular basis. I do this at the cost of my own time, without compensation and for the benefit of others.

    > You state above that you are not an (bed bug) expert. I understand this. Clearly, the people seeking such assistance are not experts, it would be counter intuitive that they are. You need to accept that I do know the answers to these questions and topicality and I'm sharing my insights and opinions for your benefit. You shouldn't get mad if you simply don't like or agree with the comments or answers.

    > It is fair and reasonable to state that I am likely the most consistent supporter of self help/self treatment than any other individual who participates on the BBRF but I'll leave to another participant to confirm this for you. In fact, during my first few months participating here I was ostracized for recommending self treatment methodologies.

    > You contend that "I am not happy" with your effort to increase government assistance which is untrue. I'm NOT unhappy about it. In fact, I really don't care if this is how you choose to use your time. I'm simply pointing out that today's bed bug victim is better served addressing their immediate problem resolution than waiting for government help which is not going to arrive. Additionally, I think it is futile to put a lot of effort into getting "the government" to do significantly more about the bed bug issue than what the public apparently perceives. There are people doing this already but it will take time to manifest change. However, none of this will help suffering bed bug victims today or in the foreseeable future.

    > You seem to ignore the allocation of limited resources factor and those agencies that interface with the bed bug issue are already overwhelmed.

    > Please note that I don't point this out to be a "wet blanket" but to keep us grounded in the realities of the situation.

    > My comments are based upon my experience, education, experience and observations related to this industry and bed bug work across the country. Do you think I'd steer you in the wrong direction?

    > Seriously John, would you have me tell you anything other than the truth ? Should I simply agree with you and acclaim:
    "Excellent idea John, let's each of us write a letter to our respective congressman to direct their attention to the bed bug problem. That will assuredly fix the problem in short order !"

    > It's not my style to sugar coat things but I'm being realistic and NOT condescending.

    > Suffice it to say that if you had an actual bed bug problem I'd help you as I help many others each day.

    > If you're trying to muster an effort which would result in providing large scale assistance for bed bug victims, whether from the government or other entity, then I've provided a list of parameters for your consideration on how this can be done as well. You seem to have ignored that information.

    Have a nice day ! paul b.

  36. BigDummy

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 22:13:53
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    I've recently become an active poster, but I've been reading this site almost daily for over a year now. Paul, John, David and the rest of the pros who donate their time and experience to this site are here to help, not to hawk their wares. Each has their own approach, which is incredibly useful when we're all dealing with a problem with no clear-cut solution.

  37. Bedbugloco

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    Sun Jan 5 2014 22:30:43
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    BugginOutCNJ - 1 day ago  » 
    I'm new to this so I don't know if there is any such thing out there, but there needs to be public service announcements to dispel the stigma of bed bugs coming from uncleanliness and lower class. I'm more than sure that MANY infestations go unreported out of fears of evictions and being judged by others, and the epidemic is MUCH more widespread than the average person perceives. Many people believe "It will never happen to me."

    Totally agree with what you said, it's very humiliating to tell people because immediate they will judge you. Here in NYC, the rich in very wealthy and famous hotels, retail stores, have had bed bugs at some point. I work for a famous store and there are rumors of bed bugs. I even have a plastic bag in my locker. The rich can afford expensive treatment, however the poor can't afford expensive professionals who will resolve the problem. And some of these companies charge to the maximum. This is a complex epidemic, a very complicated plague. It is to me a plague because in these times where science, computers, and education is advanced to solve problem we don't have an definite answer on how to eradicate them completely. There is not a single formula or product. I still can't believe that such a little thing can be so big?

  38. P Bello

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    Mon Jan 6 2014 13:36:25
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    In NYC you have a new Mayor. The previous Mayor's Office was influential in the formation of a bed bug task force type effort/thing. You also have Public Broadcasting Station(s) on televisions as well as PS Announcements on radio there as well.

    Perhaps folks could communicate with these folks to get a suitable PSA on the air and/or in the newspapers???

    Note that we were working with a television producer/studio team that wanted to film a bed bug remediation job(s) live. They sought an infested SF Home or Apartment where this could be done. We had and have plenty of such locations. They also wanted to interview the residents about their bed bug experience as well. However, none of the bed bug victim residents we asked about this were willing to be identified or seen on television in connection with having bed bugs in their homes which is totally understandable. ALL were willing to have their bed bug remediation job at their homes appear in video but none were willing to appear on the show themselves. And, the television folks were adamant about having the bed bug victims in the show. So, there's that. and the show was never done.

    There are certain regulations and funding for PSA announcements and this may be an effective way to raise public awareness and decrease the negative social stigma. However, when numerous bed bug victims are not willing to come forward themselves, it's sort of like a "catch 22" type thing.

    Additionally, when was the last time you saw a story about bed bugs on the news? It seems as if the news media has adopted a "been there done that" attitude with bed bugs which may be an additional obstacle to overcome.

    paul b.

  39. RaccoonEyes

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    Mon Jan 6 2014 13:50:01
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    Too bad you couldn't get a hotel to agree, Paul. That would freak people out and get them to pay more attention.
    Or you could go all "Billy the Exterminator" on them wearing numetal outfits- and a combination of COPS... blur out people's faces and voices when you go to their house to film.

  40. P Bello

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    Mon Jan 6 2014 14:33:29
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    Suffice it to say that there are certain television shows that would not be advantageous for me to appear on.

    pjb

  41. needrest

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    Mon Jan 6 2014 19:41:58
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    Ya Raccoon I like the cross cops/exterminater tv show idea. The theme song could be the same as cops show only the words would say bad bug bad bug watcha gonna do whatcha gonna do when exterminater comes for you.


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