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Should I encase a new

(8 posts)
  1. katydidnt

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 17:54:01
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    I just purchased a twin-size "down alternative" (polyester) Seasons Collection comforter (aka a duvet) from Bed Bath and Beyond, 68"w x 88"l.

    The comforter is washable and dryable but isn't hypo-allergenic and does not come with a zippered cover, nor does it say that it's mite-proof , which I assume would mean bed bug proof as well, since bed bugs are larger than mites. Questions:

    (1) Can I make this comforter bed bug proof by buying a zippered encasement like the one I have on my mattress? Are there special encasements for comforters, or do you have to buy a mattress encasement? Since that would be quite expensive--a large twin comforter is as wide, though not as thick, as a queen-size mattress--is there something effective but cheaper that I can do?

    (2) If I exchange the one I have for one with a removable zippered cover labeled "mite-proof", would that keep bed bugs out without adding a separate encasement?

    I don't have bed bugs--yet--but am slowly investing in preventive measures like the mattress encasement on my bed, and would greatly appreciate any information--thanks!

  2. toledo

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 18:21:22
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    I don't see any point in encasing a comforter. Once you put an encasement on, you have to leave it on forever. A comforter is something you want to wash and dry occasionally. A hot dryer would take care of any bugs you may encounter.

  3. katydidnt

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 19:33:08
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    Thanks, Toledo.

  4. Richard_Naylor

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Nov 29 2010 16:21:30
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    I agree. It's a waste of money and won't have any benefit. Bedbugs don't like to get inside soft furnishings like duvets. They are much happier in the frame of the bed or around the headboard. They only start to get in the soft furnishings when the infestation is left untreated for ages and the population gets really big. The companies selling encasements must be making a fortune but in 90+% of cases I really can't see any value at all.

  5. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Nov 29 2010 16:45:10
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    Hi,

    Just to chime in I am also not a big fan of "encostments" they have non preventative properties as bedbugs dont know if you have one at home whent hey get onto you or your luggage.

    Education, understanding and awareness have much greater returns on your investment in terms of prevention along with early detection before the issue takes hold.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  6. katydidnt

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Nov 30 2010 1:58:18
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    Many thanks to both of you for the reassurance. It's comforting, no pun intended, to know that early detection offers hope of getting rid of the critters if you have to.

    I take it that there's no point in encasing foam or latex pillows, then? (I don't have any down pillows.) I was about to order a whole bunch of pillow encasements, but if I understand correctly, it's really only the mattresses and box springs that need encasement for prevention--is that right?

    Of course, if they can't get into the mattress, I guess they'll try to find someplace else to party. But hopefully, by the time they figure that out, the passive monitors I have near the headboards in my home will have detected them and I'll have called the exterminator.

  7. BBcoukHome

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Nov 30 2010 6:39:23
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    Hi,

    I am prepared to compromise and say that box spring encasements can make removal easier if installed in advance but prevention is not something that they are capable of doing in any form.

    For something to be preventative it has to be able to stop bedbugs getting in the location in the first place which clearly they cant.

    Not a fan of pillow encasements as bedbugs are rarely in the pillows unless extremely infested in which case its like using sticky tape to patch up the hoover dam. The foam and allergy material pillows have even less reason to be encased anyway.

    Limiting potential refugia is a good idea but ultimately not needed if you provide bedbugs with the ideal home in terms of a passive monitor.

    Hope that clarifies.

    David

  8. katydidnt

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Nov 30 2010 12:36:01
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    Thanks, David. I got the passive monitors because they sounded like a good idea. I'm glad to know they're an even better choice for prevention than I realized. (Hey, I wouldn't want to sleep in one.)


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