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Renting a condo listed on the bedbug registry

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  1. curious7638

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jun 8 2012 9:10:16
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    I'm thinking of renting a place as the location, price, environment seem fantastic. However, I recently found out that its been reported on the bedbug registry: http://bedbugregistry.com/location/ON/L8N/Hamilton/150%20Charlton%20Ave%20E

    I really like the building, but I don't want to deal with any bedbug problems. Will renting here be worth the risk?

    Thanks for the help!

  2. brooklyn_bites

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jun 8 2012 9:32:53
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    If it were just one reported incident and it had been taken care of, I would say don't worry about it. However... this looks like an ongoing problem that has potentially not been resolved. This person in particular: "I been at this apt for a number of years.I have never in my life dealt with so much problems .bed bugs not the word for it pest control is all ways here i am moving out this week cant take it any more dont move in there trust me not worth it"

    I don't know, I would take heed and find another place.

  3. Canuck

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jun 8 2012 9:34:54
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    Only you can answer if the risk is worth the potential cost for you. On the plus side the latest report is six months old. Check their dumpster. Ask the neighbours. Ask the property manager - do they acknowledge the history on the registry and are up-front about the remediation measures. On the negative side, there are so many reports in close proximity, you know something is going on and six months is not very long if it is a large building with/was a wide-spread infestation. I certainly would not move in without a canine-inspection (I know of management companies that are routinely hire a dog to inspect immediately when an apartment is vacated and again when the new tenants move in) and installing an early warning system, e.g. passive monitor. Don't forget to check out your local laws in terms of whose responsibility is eradication, etc.

    Sheree Swindle / certified K9-assisted bed bug inspector
  4. curious7638

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jun 8 2012 15:07:31
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    Thanks for the feedback! The property manager was candid and mentioned that they did have a bed bug problem, but said that they have a program to deal with the pests. They said the problem was isolated to the higher floors (which is where the unit I'm thinking of renting is) and admitted that there is currently one unit with a bed bug issue.

    Are the chances of bed bugs travelling between apartments very high? The building is quite large and consists of ~200 units. The current tenant said that they've been living in the unit for 3 years and haven't experienced any problems so far.

    I really like the building, but I'm still not sure whether this potential problem should be a dealbreaker.

  5. rAVENSFAN99

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jun 8 2012 17:33:14
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    This would be a dealbreaker for me. I ignored an apartment in a similar situation and wound up in a nightmare. He's admitting that the apartment you're looking at is in the "hot zone."

    The previous tenants in my (now former) apartment also told me that there were no bedbugs in their apartment. They were also mysteriously breaking their lease and, according to the real estate broker, "moving to Japan." (They were not even leaving the city, I learned later.)

    I would talk to surrounding units. Knock on doors. Ask lots of questions.

  6. thecitymusthelp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jun 8 2012 20:20:01
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    If it was me, I would run as fast as I can away from that apartment hoping that no hitchhikers got on me.

  7. curious7638

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Jun 11 2012 15:25:54
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    Just a quick update: I had the chance to speak to the property manager to find out more information and apparently the building mainly had a problem with bedbugs 2 years ago. At this point in time, only one unit is still undergoing treatment since the tenant hasn't been as cooperative.

    Management has pest control visit every 2 weeks to take care of any problems that may arise and it seems like the they have a pretty proactive approach to pests.

    Should I still steer clear of this building? Is it better to find a building with no history of bedbugs (at least based on the registry and what the managers tell me) Or, is it better to find a building with a comprehensive pest control program?

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Jun 11 2012 22:48:17
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    The thing is, those reports cover two years, which is not a good sign -- and more importantly, perhaps, they're in a condo building.

    I can't imagine why an owner who occupies their own unit wold ever report it to the bed bug registry, just as a homeowner living in a house would not.

    So I would be worried that there were more incidents from people who occupied units they actually owned, who aren't reporting, and that you're only seeing reports from tenant-occupied units.

    Not only are condo owners less likely to report, they may be less likely to seek treatment through the management company -- so management may not be aware of all reports.

    In general, I would prefer a building with a proactive bed bug program, but I am not convinced that's what's in place here. Lots of buildings have a regular roach spray (or gel application), but that's not likely to "preventively" treat bed bugs.

    What would impress me is a building with some bed bug reports but which also had a comprehensive bed bug plan-- for example, they tell you upfront that when a unit gets bed bugs, attached units are automatically professionally inspected, monitored, and treated if necessary. They provide bed bug information to all tenants. And they don't just wait for each individual resident to come forward before taking action. I've seen these kinds of things from friends' landlords.

    What would also impress me is seeing some not too recent complaints and then getting details about how the problem was resolved-- exactly what was done and (again) whether attached units on all sides were proactively inspected and/or treated as a matter of course.

    In your case, the most recent complaint is summer 2011 from what I see, but the owner-occupier factor may be a wild card, and the biweekly spray jockey may not have the effect you desire. At the end of the day, you have to make the decision based on the information you have and what you're comfortable with. Any apartment can get bed bugs, so the real question is, how will they react if/when it happens?

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  9. ShelaghDB

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jun 12 2012 23:43:43
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    I would not go near this building.
    Whose to say why the person moved out of that unit before it was put up for sale. It might just be ground zero for bed bugs.

    No Soiree Bob, wouldn't catch me renting there and I am from downtown area in Toronto and more used to it but with that many reports I wold be looking elsewhere


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