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Reinfested or some late bloomers?

(7 posts)
  1. gotsome

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Mar 20 2017 20:43:47
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    I discovered I was infested with bedbugs back in December. Once I had some positive identification, pest control was brought in and my place was sprayed - they said I had a very light infestation. Fast forward about a month later (February), and I discovered a nymph on a kitchen counter (I am in a studio apartment). I got pest control back out and they resprayed the outlets but nothing else. They guy was extremely puzzled about how I could be experiencing problems when I had such a light infestation. Things seemed alright up until this weekend when I woke up with bites (no sightings so far). It has been about a month since I found the nymph in the kitchen and two since the initial spraying.

    I have been fighting with my landlord since December to inspect the other apartments but I've have talked to the maintenance guys for the apartment complex, and they say no one else has complained about anything, While I trust them, my apartment also requires tenants to pay for their own pest control, so no one has any incentive to report issues. I also have very little confidence in pest controls abilities, they've, among other things, been trying to convince me I'm harboring bedbugs in my air mattress as well as refusing to inspect the other apartments. This whole thing has me extremely stressed.

    What are the odds I have been reinfested from the neighbors versus some late hatching bedbugs?

  2. Livingagain

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Mar 21 2017 6:22:05
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    It really could be either. I would bet that they just didn't get them all. The February treatment was, for sure, not adequate. I hope you didn't have to pay someone for that. Even the best sprays themselves aren't fully adequate, currently. Do you know which spray they used?

    Ask the PCO about you applying Cimexa dust. (Or him apply if you could get him to do it.) You can use a household paintbrush and apply around bed legs, under mattresses, around couch legs, in cracks and crevices of couches, perimeters of rooms, etc. You'll probably need to wear a mask when you apply (read the directions) but don't wet and then apply, like the directions say you can, because it makes it less effective. Good luck!

  3. gotsome

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Mar 21 2017 15:29:07
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    I didn't! Luckily the second "treatment" was within my warranty period.

    The PCO used Bedlam and Tempo SC Ultra the first time. Second time...I think they just used bedlam based off the canister appearance (I didn't get a good look).

    I mostly worry about being infected from the neighbors because I know I didn't bring the bed bugs in when I moved since I got bites the very first night I slept there and I remember waking up in the wee hours of the morning and seeing a bug crawl away. I have been told my studio was empty for a while between the last tenant and myself due to renovations. Are bedbugs more likely to hibernate when their main food source leaves or go hunting next door? The walls between apartments are extremely thin and when I found the bedbug in the kitchen it was next to an outlet (I didn't actually see if exiting the outlet though)

  4. Livingagain

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Mar 21 2017 21:58:54
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    Bedlam isn't great, hopefully, the Bedlam is the Bedlam Plus which is better. And I'm in over my depth with the "ultra" formulation of Tempo. But even the best sprays out there aren't killing 100% of them. I'd still check about supplementing with Cimexa, if I were you.

    I believe you that they were there when you got there, that's a very common bedbugger story. Dealing with neighbors is tough, you have to really insist on action by management. I'm not sure if the bugs are more likely to stay or not.

  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Mar 21 2017 23:59:20
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    Am I reading this correctly that you initially had only one treatment? One spray or dust treatment can eliminate a problem in many cases but it's not the norm. Most cases require 2-3 treatment spaced about two weeks apart.

    If you haven't yet, implement some bed bug monitors, which c an help you determine if the problem is gone.

    You're right to be concerned about the neighbors. I don't suppose you're in Boston?

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  6. gotsome

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Mar 27 2017 19:17:42
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    Nope, I'm in Utah.

    Yeah, I have had...1.5 sprays. 1 full spray with the Bedlam and Tempo and .5 of a spray when they just redid the outlets in my kitchen. Other than the spray, the PCO has done nothing else. They were convinced I had such a light infestation that I wouldn't need more than one spray. It took several nagging phone calls on my behalf from the apartment maintenance to even get follow up from the initial spray.

    I'll look into monitors. It'll probably help with some of the anxiety in determining if I have anything still. I've been going off my reactions (which, I know this website advises against for some very good reasons) but back in January I got curious and did some documenting of my bites and how I reacted. The bites I've had this last week are definitely similar.

  7. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Mar 27 2017 23:54:02
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    Monitors are a good idea as is learning to look for new fecal stains. If bed bugs bite, they poop nearby, every time. So finding fecal stains in your bed, or on upholstered chairs, is a good way to know they're still there. If you find a stain and aren't sure, post a photo.

    Visual evidence is much more informative than skin reactions, which can be caused by treatment methods in some cases, and which won't necessarily correspond to new bed bug bites.


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