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Question about cats during treatment

(14 posts)
  1. forgotaboutj

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Jan 13 2013 18:18:00
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    I am being treated for bed bugs tomorrow and I have a year and a half old cat who lives with me in my apartment. We were originally going to be treated by a company who said that the cat could stay in the bathroom during treatment and for 4 hours afterwards. However, my landlord switched companies and the new company told me that my cat had to be out of the apartment for at least 24 hours. I was unable to find any friends willing to board my cat once they found out we were being treated for bed bugs, so I called the PCO back and they told me to lock the cat in the bathroom for 24 hours with towels in front of the door so that the fumes don't affect her. We, the humans, only have to be gone for 6 hours.

    Here is where I am concerned - my bathroom doesn't have a window so I will have to leave her in a completely inclosed space. Now I know that humans can be in a sealed 10 sq foot room for 5 hours before carbon monoxide build up becomes a problem. Presumably cats need less oxygen and can survive longer. And I believe the 24 hours rule is so that they don't sniff up or inhale anything dangerous on the floor/walls/etc. before it is 100% dry.

    Long story short, is there anything I should be worried about if I seal my cat in a windowless bathroom for 6 hours during treatment?

  2. bedbugsuptown

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Jan 13 2013 18:47:28
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    forgotaboutj, welcome. Honestly, I don't think you have a thing to worry about. I had a cat during my infestation, 2011 (she was 15 and died 2mos. ago, miss her) and I went through the same thing. The damn neighbor whose cat I'd fed for mos. when she was living with her boyfriend said no--nuff said 'bout her--

    I think my pco said the bathroom would be fine, thing is my apartment building is old and the over the years the doors fittings have expanded--in short the doors do not close shut, the cat would get out.

    I didn't have a carrier and stuck her in a grilled metal filing cabinet from Pier One. I put a folded blanket on the bottom for comfort and topped it with 2 heavy art books and stuck her in the hallway. Don't know how she did it but she broke outta there and about an hour after treatment I found her sitting on the 4th floor! I brought her back in and never had a problem. BTW-- I was inside the apartment helping, watching during chemical treatments.

  3. forgotaboutj

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Jan 13 2013 19:20:14
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    Haha, cats can be very resourceful and tricky animals. And it's amazing how stigmitizing bed bugs can be....

    Anyways, thanks for the comfort.

  4. critterbug

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Jan 13 2013 19:21:12
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    Purely my own experience, not professional advice, but I've been spraying my own place every 3 weeks for about 4 years and have never had a problem with my 2 cats (I don't lock them up, just let them roam as usual...indoor cats). I've used a succession of chemicals- Cyzmic, Cyanora, and now Transport. Unless you also use Gentrol, you probably wouldn't even notice a smell let alone fumes with these products. Of course your PCO could be using something much more toxic but it's been my experience that most PCOs don't use chemicals that will harm pets. I think the warning to put the pet away is a placebo for a worrisome pet owner for the most part.

    All that said, locking your cat in the bathroom is fine. It should have a ducted exhaust fan that allows fresh air whether it's turned on or not. Even if you don't have an exhaust fan, I think you'd have to caulk and tape and try extremely hard to make it airtight enough to suffocate a cat.

  5. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Jan 13 2013 20:18:30
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    Dear forg,

    I'm not a big cat fan but I'll provide some comments for your review and consideration anyway:

    > The optimal situation is to remove your cat as advised and not traumatize it by locking it in the bathroom.

    > Plus, and thos could be a factor later, you will now have the bathroom that is untreated during a bed bug situation; not ideal !

    > Cat Options:
    * Board the cat at a vet, pestsmart or whatever? (that costs about $15 to $25for one day and you have the benefit of a safe cat, a non-cat damaged bathroom, no cat sh#t or pee to clean up, no related "cat odor" and the bathroom can be treated.
    * Put the cat in a pet carrier and bring it to work with you.
    * Open the door ant let Fluffy out for "a run" if it comes back it's your cat, if it doesn't, well it was never meant to be and The Lord + Mother Nature wanted it that way.

    > However, if you simply must lock your cat in the bath, fear not, there's more than enough air in that room for your cat.

    (I can't believe I've already spen this much time & effort on a friggin cat.)

    > If you have a cat pet carrier box thing, put it in that so it doesn't tear up your bath room.

    Hope this helps, good luck ! paul b.

  6. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Jan 13 2013 21:16:29
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    I had heat treatment on my apartment, so my cat had to be gone for quite a bit longer than that.

    However, one other option is to see if you can't drop your cat off at a good local pet store for a bath during the treatment time.

    If you think about it, the time it takes to take the cat to the groomer, be groomed, and then be picked up--all told should tally up to about 6 hours--even if it means sitting around with her (or him) for an hour or two in the carrier after picking your cat up.

    Finding a place to board your cat for part of a day may be tricky; if so, a trip to a groomer for a bath might not be a bad alternative especially if your cat is better behaved in a carrier than mine is. Mine has a nasty habit of yowling and howling like she's being tortured the whole time she's in a carrier, so . . .uh yeah.

    (I did send my cat out for a bath the same time the apartment was being treated; after her bath, she went to stay in a crate at my pet sitter's place until the apartment cooled down enough to move her back in. My plan was FAR more complicated than anyone's needed to be since my heat treatment was done the day I had to get on a plane and fly to the other half of the state for a family wedding. I did, however, inform the groomer about the situation. In retrospect, I think that was overly cautious. Bed bugs are not like fleas; in general, bed bugs don't live on their hosts. and apparently bed bugs will prefer feasting on humans over feasting on cats and dogs.)

  7. forgotaboutj

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Jan 14 2013 1:03:32
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    I thought about bringing her to a place that will board her, but the problem is that the PCO is coming tomorrow morning (Monday) and I highly doubt I could have had an application approved by then, given that it would be her first time boarded. If I had had more notice than just one day to find somewhere for her (thanks landlord), then this would be a lot easier. I didn't have the day confirmed until today.

    So unfortunately I think I am stuck leaving her in the bathroom. She won't like it at all, but as long as I know that she will ultimately be okay, I can rest easier.

    @P Bello: I'm fairly certain the PCO wasn't actually planning on treating the bathroom, so I don't think I will be impeding anything there. Whether they should be or not is a different question...

    Man, everyone here is so helpful!

  8. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Jan 14 2013 15:25:44
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    Having boarded a cat before (and, wow, did she really not like that) I tried taking her with me (she liked that even less) before I gave up and hired a cat sitter (she disliked that too, but she tolerated it a lot more than boarding or flying), I know that most vets require a stack of paperwork and sometimes a lot of notice. I'm in California, so your mileage may vary, but the groomers around here often require no advance paperwork (like certification of vaccines and such) and may have same day appointments.

    I suspect this is too late to be of use to you, but I figured I'd put the info in here for future people reading the thread.

    Hope your treatment goes well, forgotaboutj!

  9. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Jan 15 2013 3:08:00
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    Dogs are easier and they're always happy to see you when you get home.

    Maybe trade in your cat for a dog . . .

    But, I'm biased and not a cat guy.

    pjb

  10. buggyinsyracuse

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Jan 15 2013 14:12:11
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    Paul - we call our cat the "fat useless furry creature," but I can assure you she is quite happy to see us when we get home!

  11. 71kat71

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu May 11 2017 10:50:47
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    P Bello - 4 years ago  » 
    Dogs are easier and they're always happy to see you when you get home.
    Maybe trade in your cat for a dog . . .
    But, I'm biased and not a cat guy.
    pjb

    That's like telling someone to trade in their kid for what you consider a better one...

  12. Richard56

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu May 11 2017 11:01:18
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    71Kat,

    Your sense of humor is only surpassed by your tardiness. You're replying to a post that is 4 years old! And Paul was joking -- I mean, who would take a cat as a trade in for a dog?

    Richard

  13. bedbugsbugme

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu May 11 2017 11:23:49
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    Get both. 2x the fun 😂😂

    I'm not an expert. Just sharing what I learned from my experience.
  14. Richard56

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu May 11 2017 11:25:42
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    And lock them up in the same bathroom


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