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Please recommend best crack filler and double sided tape

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  1. Ross123

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 9:58:58
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    Hi bb fighters

    I'm a tenant in a building and I want to take preventive measures to make sure eventual bed bugs don't come from other apartments into mine. I'm examining every possible way they can come by crawling and I want to seal or block every path. I intend to fill cracks and block with tape perimeters of the apartment door, vents, plugs, outlets, etc.
    What do you think is the best tape, crack filler, or anything else for this?
    I will greatly appreciate your advice.

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 13:29:20
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    Hi Ross123,

    The best way to prevent from getting bedbugs from your adjoining neighbours is to educate them on avoidance and early detection.

    By communicating the issue you can stop them getting infected int he first place and thus have no risk of bedbugs getting bad enough to come through to your property.

    I am not a massive fan of caulking as a preventative because the caulk will eventually dry and shrink and tapes need replacing every week or so as they loose their stick. I have also seen the effect that sealing bedbugs under the flooring can have on an infestation and I would not wish that on anyone.

    The other good news is that education and avoidance are free. Early detection might cost you a few bucks but certainly no more than $60.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  3. cilecto

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 13:44:46
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    David. London must be a very special place.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  4. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 14:06:53
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    cilecto - 19 minutes ago  » 
    David. London must be a very special place.

    Don't I just know it, and its full of both special people and special bedbugs.

    I am not saying its easy to discuss the issue with neighbours but it IS the most effective solution. I am very fond of explaining to people when they express horror at the thought of discussing the issue with neighbours that there has never been such a good time to discuss bedbugs with neighbours since they are constantly in the media.

    David

  5. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 14:33:37
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    David,

    Would you still be inclined to "stick" with the preference you expressed in 2008 at...

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/best-sticky-tape#post-38694

    ...and would you feel there's any reason to discourage someone from trying the commercially available double-sided Bed Bug Barrier Tape (I have no connection with the product myself) from Tallman Scientific...

    http://www.tallmanscientific.com/Bed-Bug-Barrier-Tape.php

    ...which is very reasonably priced although beware shipping may cost more than the product itself, as I found out just after completing my online order.

    jrbtnyc

  6. cilecto

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 14:47:24
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    My city's unofficial motto is "fuhgetaboutit".

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 14:57:31
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    Hi jrbtnyc ,

    As you have trawled my old posts you will be aware that I am not a big fan of the concept of isolating areas when dealing with bedbugs which includes tapes as well as other tools.

    I have on a few occasions, less than 10 times in about 19,000 cases used it for a few days and never as a long term solution.

    The simple fact is that if you isolate you give bedbugs no other choice than to hide in less accessible places where they are by definition harder to treat.

    As for the site you linked yes I would discourage people, partly because aside from 1 product the others are not what I would recommend for bedbugs and as a point of order anyone who sells a travel spray as a preventative has got the wrong end of the problem if you ask me. Although one other plus point is that their better business bureau entry is up to date unlike one other I posted about tonight.

    Isolation invariably prolongs infestations its just as plain and simple as that.

    David

  8. Ross123

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 17:08:36
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    Hi, thank you all for your advices.
    I have planned to apply the tape and close the cracks today and before I went out to get them, I only saw the first reply from David. For the lack of knowing better I went to Walmart and luckily decided to get the carpet tape like the one suggested by jrbtnyc. Thank you very much jrbtnyc, if I knew that was the right tape I would have bought more. I also got Poly filla instant cracks filler and I'm already done with the closets.

    About the education of the other tenants, they are already aware and educated about the bb threat but I don't trust other people
    My bb philosophy is not allowing them to bite = bb death.

  9. KillerQueen

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 17:20:51
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    Forget tape. For cracks and crevices go with this- http://www.dap.com/product_details.aspx?BrandID=14&SubcatID=3

    For larger voids or cracks you can fill areas with this- http://www.dap.com/product_details.aspx?BrandID=19&SubcatID=4

    I can't give more info right now because I'm typing on a phone.

  10. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 18:11:37
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    I used Great Stuff foam gap filler to fill the gap under the baseboard heater, and store-brand light spackle for the gaps around the door frames.

    I don't see why isolating areas invariably prolongs an infestation. If they can't get to my dresser or my coat rack or my desk, there are still plenty of other harborage sites for them to use, where I'll be more likely to find them and less likely to unknowingly take them with me when I go somewhere. Easier to find = shorter infestation, no?

  11. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 19:48:50
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    bed-bugscouk - 4 hours ago  » 
    Hi jrbtnyc ,
    As you have trawled my old posts you will be aware that I am not a big fan of the concept of isolating areas when dealing with bedbugs which includes tapes as well as other tools.
    I have on a few occasions, less than 10 times in about 19,000 cases used it for a few days and never as a long term solution.
    The simple fact is that if you isolate you give bedbugs no other choice than to hide in less accessible places where they are by definition harder to treat.
    ...
    Isolation invariably prolongs infestations its just as plain and simple as that.
    David

    David,

    When the bugs hide in the less accessible places, does that make humans less accessible to the bugs too, i.e. the bugs have a harder time biting the humans i.e. they bite the humans significantly less often?

    What if we were to focus on developing ways to accentuate that much further until the bugs are hardly able to bite the humans *at all*?

    Wouldn't that make presence of the bugs nearly inconsequential?

    In other words, wouldn't this be a novel, back-door but perhaps effective, approach to resolving the bug crisis *which no one has tried*?

    Who cares if there are a lot of bugs around and how long an infestation lasts if the bugs *aren't biting*? And won't be biting next month or next year either?

    Especially if reaching that state of affairs can happen at low cost, whereas eliminating every single bug is expensive and so many people, out of work, in debt, etc., emphatically can't afford to attempt that?

    Or if they *can* afford to attempt it, and actually succeed at it, maybe they have a couple of apartment-next-door neighbors who can't afford it so the latters' apartments will soon re-infest the former's?

    No doubt you can tell I would truly fancy an opportunity to discuss this topic with you in exhaustive detail and go friendly toe-to-toe for, say, an afternoon sitting on a park bench, in facile conversation rather than this constant slow typing at a distance.

    Because I or anyone would have to be impressed by your tremendous experience from decades of work and 19,000 cases and would have to give extraordinary weight to your views and your ability to back them up with innumerable tales from the trenches.

    But at the same time should we rule out the possibility that an outsider like myself might have a fresh perspective.

    Throughout history, how many inventors have espoused novel concepts in fields where the currently perceived state-of-the-art experts said oh, that will never work because of x-y-z but later it turned out the experts' view of possibilities had been incomplete and the interloper spotted something they had overlooked.

    I think the possibilities of what I call ultra-isolation/attrition as a way to fight bb's have never been explored, never been subjected to systematic experimentation and therefore, respectfully, no one should discount those possibilities until someone does put them to some kind of organized test.

    So, when's your next visit to NYC? I'm going to put in a reservation for that bench .

    jrbtnyc

  12. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 20:13:51
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    I like the idea of isolating the bed when you don't have an infestation. I expect there's a decent chance of doing it well enough that if a few bugs do come in on some item, they won't get well established. But I doubt that starving them out is a viable strategy for getting rid of a significant infestation. They can wait a long time, and meanwhile they're wandering around and getting into everything.

  13. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 20:23:25
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    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious - 4 minutes ago  » 
    I like the idea of isolating the bed when you don't have an infestation. I expect there's a decent chance of doing it well enough that if a few bugs do come in on some item, they won't get well established. But I doubt that starving them out is a viable strategy for getting rid of a significant infestation. They can wait a long time, and meanwhile they're wandering around and getting into everything.

    My thought is to isolate not only the bed, but everything else in the residence too, as fiercely as possible yet still completely livable and comfortable for the humans.

    Sure, maybe the idea won't work – but is there any harm in at least testing it? Would there be any harm in finding a bunch of volunteers who can't afford the expense of attempting eradication (which may be unsuccessful anyway!) (or may soon be defeated by re-infestation which can happen so easily!) and therefore would like to try the very inexpensive approach which I call ultra-isolation/attrition.

    They would have to commit to staying with the regimen for, say, two years. No fair to judge it after only a few days or weeks.

    Because the whole point is, it won't beat the bugs quickly but it *will* beat them (sez jrbtnyc), and reliably, and for a cost millions of people will be able to manage unlike the costly PCO offerings.

    Maybe in the course of such trials we'll learn something we didn't expect, or who knows.

    But how can we dismiss it just based on talking about it.

    * * * *

    Meanwhile I'm a bit concerned about getting this thread off-topic which would be my fault so, sorry about that and perhaps we should return to commenting on particular products as the original poster asked about.

  14. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 20:42:43
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    What do you mean by "isolate everything else"? The bugs will go somewhere, whether it's under the rug or inside a door or what.

  15. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 22 2011 20:59:08
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    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious - 3 minutes ago  » 
    What do you mean by "isolate everything else"? The bugs will go somewhere, whether it's under the rug or inside a door or what.

    What I mean is precisely that. LET them go under the rug, or inside a door, or wherever they please. Because what are they going to EAT there. They have to come OUT of those places to feed, on you. So, what I mean by ultra-isolation/attrition is, focus on keeping the bugs from getting from wherever they're hiding to YOU. Block the pathways they utilize to get to YOU. Don't worry where they're hiding because that's their turf in effect. Don't obsess about chasing them on their turf. Make them come to your turf such that *they* have to do the work to chase you, rather than *you* having to do the work to chase them. If you constantly try to kill them in their hiding places at huge trouble and expense, that actually seems dumb to me, like the classic bull attacking the red cape instead of the matador. The point is, I think there are oh so many ways to accomplish this goal of blocking the bugs from getting from where they are to you which no one has tried. If I can convince the best minds and most seasoned practitioners among bb-fighters to start looking at it this way, I think we'll come up with terrific insights and new diabolical stratagems to thwart the bugs, doing so on the cheap so everyone rich and poor can benefit from the innovations. It all starts with isolating the bed, but then you isolate chairs, tables, furniture, the walls and ceilings, and even your own feet and legs – all at very moderate expense – always with the goal of preventing bugs from being able to get onto you, irrespective of where the bugs have just been hiding for the last whatever number of hours or days. By addressing it this way, I think you'll be able to stymie the bugs to such an extent that their bites will become so infrequent that you'll be able to recover pretty much your normal life. The bugs will *still be there*, but so what if they're *not biting*? And if they're not biting, then of course that's eventually going to starve them, or force them to disperse elsewhere in journeys that are likely to be very hazardous to each individual bug, and give fungi and bacteria, etc., lots of extra time to attack the bugs, and the bugs won't be able to cluster during their lonely journeys to conserve moisture which can be a critical factor for them, and hopefully your neighbors will have adopted ultra-isolation/attrition too so the bugs won't gain anything by arriving at your neighbors' places, and your neighbors won't get bitten any more often than you've been getting bitten, and your neighbors won't have to spend any more money on it than you've been spending on it, and by that time the bugs will be even hungrier and thirstier and weaker and more stressed and more miserable and a lot closer to...their demise.

  16. Koebner

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Mar 23 2011 5:24:45
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    jrbtnyc - the only way your isolation plan can work is to isolate the people from the bugs.

    I think it's more practical & more attractive to concentrate on eradicating bugs from buildings than to spend the rest of my days in a sealed HazMat suit.

  17. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Mar 23 2011 7:27:57
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    Hi jrbtnyc,

    Your approach is 100% wrong based on field observations of bedbugs over the last 8 years.

    I will explain this only 1 more time.

    You isolate and tape up and the bedbugs will move into harder to treat places, yes you will get some drop in bite frequency but you end up with a harder problem to resolve which could spread to your neighbours or other rooms in the house. It will not stop them feeding, just make it harder for them to feed and prolong peoples suffering.

    You focus on not being bitten and I focus on actually treating the bedbugs and eradicating them. I know which philosophy works and no I don't want to waste my time on a park bench debating it, I have already explained this to you in person and I don't wish to waste my time further.

    Your isolating approach can only end up with people living in isolation suits and that does not solve the problem it simply pushes it around.

    I appreciate that you see the logic in it but from my perspective and knowledge you are doing more hard than good and sense would dictate that you stop so please do so.

    You will NEVER be able to isolate a room to the point where bedbugs cant feed you simply make it harder and more complex for them to do so.

    If you think I am wrong start your own pest control firm and prove me wrong. When you have the data we can have a coffee but until then I can assure you I have already modeled this a lot further than you have and it does not work.

    David

  18. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Mar 23 2011 7:31:24
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    Ok, so the idea isn't so much isolate everything as isolate everyone from the bugs. It seems problematic for people with pets. Some dogs can be trained to be still only on their doggie bed with its platform with ClimbUps underneath, but a lot of dogs will spend time sitting still on the floor. If I understand correctly, it only takes six bites for a bug to complete its life cycle and lay a batch of eggs. That's not a whole lot.

    On the other hand, it doesn't seem as doomed to failure as the normal strategy of finding the very last bug and spraying poison into its hiding place, while leaving the environment hospitable to bugs -- i.e., leaving it so that if you miss one bug it will re-establish the population. And worse yet, leaving it so that if one bug can survive the dose of poison it gets, it will re-establish the population.

  19. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Mar 23 2011 7:40:38
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    Hi Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious,

    You have seriously over simplified the bedbug life cycle, although it is technically possible that it only takes 6 feeds the reality is that it usually takes more. You also assume all bedbugs can lay eggs and keep the population going.

    If you isolate people and pets how do you deal with any rats, mice or birds that bedbugs will happily survive on.

    Please make yourself a large coffee and research my posts on the subject, it is technically possible that fresh ideas can add value but with all due respect if this job were that easy everyone would be doing it, fact is that its not.

    David

  20. EffeCi

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Mar 23 2011 8:54:36
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    it is technically possible that fresh ideas can add value but with all due respect if this job were that easy everyone would be doing it, fact is that its not.

    I perfectly agree with David.
    Every good idea to fight BBs needs to be based on a "perfect" knowledge of their cycle, biology, behaviour, ecology, etc.,
    When I had my first deal with BBs, more than 7 years ago, I was already an entomologist and a 15 years experienced PCO. It was a disaster.
    It took me 3-4 yrs of "search & study, test & try" to find an effective way to deal with them.

  21. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Mar 23 2011 14:36:52
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    Hi EffeCi,

    Thank you for making a point clear that I have said many times. I did not learn how to deal with this in my first 2,000 cases. I was given a protocol to follow and follow it I did.

    It was only when I started to research the subject and found literally nothing out there that I decided that I needed to start studying the problem.

    After 3,000 cases I went out on my own in 2005 and have since built systems and teams that have enabled us to deal with close on 19,000 cases from studio flats to entire buildings (our latest is 22 floors with 200+ studios).

    Although there is a strong common thread to what we do it is always unique apart from:

    • Investigate to establish the facts
    • Work out how bad it is
    • Work out what needs to be done to fix it

    Certainly not something you can get from a manual or a 2 day seminar. Good entomology is done in the field and good PCO are field biologists. It takes me 2 months to teach people and is a massive investment in time and mentoring but its usually worth it with the right candidates.

    Its a shame I cant do more of my work with the head camera on so you could all see what we deal with. Today was the delights of an 8 bedroom student house which was the source of the infestation I dealt with last week in the 4 bedroom adjoining property. Given that the infestations were localized to only the bedrooms with an adjoining wall I was 95% certain the source was the neighbour.

    After a poor "professional" attempt at treating and a further 9 months of self treating with aerosols, moth balls and various lotions and potions it was quite a soup. The camera footage would have been heavily censored as it took something of a stimulation for the occupants to take the matter seriously but thankfully the landlord wanted to avoid a court summons I was ready to issue him.

    All in a days work but if there is a manual or guide out there I am not aware of it, its not a simple issue to deal with.

    David

    PS I really need to sort out that break in Italy soon but I dare say you will be busy through till the end of silly season

  22. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Mar 23 2011 15:33:24
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    Certainly any strategy that requires an extraordinary level of competence from the PCO is a non-starter for the general public. A whole lot of people have ordinary landlords who hire ordinary exterminators.

    You also assume all bedbugs can lay eggs and keep the population going

    Actually, I assume that "the very last bug" will be a mated adult female. This is based partly on reading somewhere that fed adult females tend to leave the aggregations to avoid the trauma of further insemination after a few matings, and partly on the common-sense idea that there has to be very strong selection pressure in favor of any trait that increases the chance of founding new infestations. And then there's reading in the Benoit article that females resist dehydration a bit better than males.

    if this job were that easy...

    Somehow, "doesn't seem as doomed to failure as the normal strategy" isn't a description I would paraphrase as "easy".

  23. EffeCi

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Mar 24 2011 12:46:00
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    PS I really need to sort out that break in Italy soon but I dare say you will be busy through till the end of silly season

    Generally, more than busy, I'm messy (not so surprising...the translation of my second name it's just "messes" :-)) ... but if/when you'll come in Italy, I'll do more than my best to meet you...

    Just tell me when (and where in Italy...)

  24. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Mar 26 2011 4:52:12
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    bed-bugscouk - 2 days ago  » 
    ...
    You isolate and tape up and the bedbugs will move into harder to treat places, yes you will get some drop in bite frequency but you end up with a harder problem to resolve which could spread to your neighbours or other rooms in the house. It will not stop them feeding, just make it harder for them to feed and prolong peoples suffering.
    ...

    David,

    Thanks for considering my posts above and offering feedback. I do appreciate it.

    jrbtnyc

  25. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Mar 31 2011 12:54:12
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    bed-bugscouk - 1 week ago  » 
    although it is technically possible that it only takes 6 feeds the reality is that it usually takes more.

    I haven't read all 1,600+ posts, but quite a lot. I haven't found where you explain the need for more than one feed per instar under field conditions. I was just reminded of it because I was looking at Johnson (1941), who mentions that as a standardization measure, every bug he tested had only one feed per instar. So I guess it must be a difference between field conditions and lab conditions.

  26. EffeCi

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Mar 31 2011 15:50:54
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    So I guess it must be a difference between field conditions and lab conditions.

    There are always differences between field and lab conditions....

  27. bed-bugscouk

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    Fri Apr 1 2011 4:31:53
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    Hi Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious,

    The reference you are looking for that covers partial and disturbed feeds resulting in greater that 1 feed per shed is Hatnack 1939 which I believe is both lab and field observations, I think there is also a mention in the 1938 Natural History Museum's economic series number 5 the bedbug.

    However in the spirit of sharing I will just say "you catch more flies with honey than you do with vinegar". I am not sure if a field observation but it does appear sometimes that you posts are aimed at either disputing what I say or discrediting it in some way. This is not just my observation but has been relayed to me by others.

    I am happy to have open discussions but if the tone continues you will only get an unhelpful "yawn yawn" from me. I am here to help people but at present I don't think we share the same agenda.

    I may however be wrong.

    David

  28. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 1 2011 6:45:42
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    Pretty much everyone is wrong a whole lot, including you and including me. Don't expect me to assume everything you say as gospel. The question is whether a person is within shouting distance of getting stuff right: in that case there's at least potentially some value in challenging the apparent errors, because one of us will get corrected. In other cases they're so far off that there's no point in trying.

    As for tone, the pot is entirely correct in its observation of the color of the kettle.

    I'll see if I can find the Hartnack paper.

  29. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 1 2011 8:24:17
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    Hmm, I've had my share of differences of opinion with David too, see above, but let's review the context: David is not a sufferer who needs help solving a bed bug problem, he comes to bedbugger.com to help people solve *their* bed bug problems as best he can. He doesn't get paid to post here. So we all ought to be highly respectful and grateful that David and others such as KillerQueen and DougSummersMS choose to participate in this forum. They've earned the right to have strong opinions, not only because they're donating their time and energy here but also because they have the decades of field experience on which to base their opinions which they're sharing with us seeking to benefit us.

  30. spideyjg

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 1 2011 8:54:48
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    +1 on everything JR said.

    I was a big caulk advocate and in talking to David and thinking further on it he is right on the perils of sealing bugs in.

    In the absence of an infestation there is no danger in caulking your home.

    You could seal but if you remove all potential harborage you think of, they will find something else.

    Bear in mind the documents of the early 19th century were on bugs without pesticide resistance.

    Elsa Peralta Blanco has noticed a marked difference in survival with resistant vs not strains. Some of the old biology may not fully apply as gospel anymore.

    Every meal take in calories while movement and development use it up. In labs 1 meal gets a molt but in the field it doesn't always. Maybe they run further and burn off too many micro calories to advance on a single meal.

    Lab results give insight into a baseline potential with controlled conditions but the field introduces countless variables. That goes across the board in lab vs field in every endeavor.

    Jim

  31. spideyjg

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 1 2011 10:49:18
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    Too early, it is Andrea not Elsa

  32. cilecto

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 1 2011 11:06:51
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    Darn. It would have been nice if Elsa's work corroborated Andrea's.

  33. Ross123

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 13 2011 14:31:42
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    Hi guys, I'm the original poster and just dropped in to say thanks to all suggestions for tape and crack fillers. Very much appreciated

    bed-bugscouk - 3 weeks ago  » 
    ....
    You isolate and tape up and the bedbugs will move into harder to treat places, yes you will get some drop in bite frequency but you end up with a harder problem to resolve which could spread to your neighbours or other rooms in the house. It will not stop them feeding, just make it harder for them to feed and prolong peoples suffering.
    .....
    David

    Well, so far this is not the case here
    I don't want to jinx it but since mid December last year till now, no bites. We are a family of 3 and all of us react severely to bites, so it is very unlikely to have been bitten without feeling anything.
    As soon as we realized we had bb bites we blocked access to our beds after making sure they are clean and since then in our daily life we are always aware about eventual ways bb can reach us to bite. I can't say that our life is as someone said "living in a HazMat suit". In fact I like the change Thanks to the bbs now our place is much more clean and tidy. Now my daughter never drops bags and cloths on the floor and puts everything back in its place. Before she would never listen. And we all improved in that respect and got rid of piles of junk collected over the years. A couple of weeks after the blockade we found an adult bug crawling on one of the walls. It didn't look in good shape and died after about a week in captivity.
    Since we are tenants in a building we decided to take advantage of the bb treatment paid by the landlord. That was a big mistake. A PCO guy came and spent about 15 minutes spraying with pesticides. He did a very bad job. We put all our belongings out on the balcony and in the bathtub leaving easy access to all walls, empty closets, etc., but it was obvious that he didn't sprayed much anywhere that was actually needed but appear to have poured tons of pesticides in our beds where there were no bugs anyway. We were told 3 hours but we were out the whole day just in case and when we came back it smelled terribly bad. My daughter got a severe allergic reaction and we spent the first night at a hotel. Daughter was feeling sick and the smell for two weeks. Since pesticides don't kill eggs, the PCO was supposed to spray again in two weeks but we denied because of the allergic reaction. We also explained to the landlord that if the second spray was needed to eliminate newborn bbs, we don't have such because the PCO sprayed after more than 5 weeks since the last bite and bbs can not lay eggs longer than 3 weeks without feeding and eggs hatching period is up to 2 weeks.
    Originally the bbs, as explained by the landlord, came from the neighbors upstairs. In addition to visiting us they have infested also the apartment downstairs and probably the apartments across us. I work from home and have a good view of the parking from my window, I see the PCO truck coming more than once per month and can hear the distinct knocking of his spraying device when he is in the neighbors' apartment. When that happens I close windows and leave for several hours to make sure we don't get any second hand pesticide fumes inhalation.
    Since the ineffective spraying in our apartment we've caught 6 adult bb trespassers which apparently have had at least 5-6 blood meals from the neighbors to get to that stage. Initially we only blocked the beds and didn't care about the possibility of bbs passing through out apartment and even staying in some corner or crack if they choose to do so but recently we caught in the bathroom 4 in 2 days and I decided to seal the cracks and block paths to closets and bathroom. 2 of the bbs dropped from the vent in the bathroom in a plastic container mounted under the vent, because of a tape all around, they can't crawl anywhere else but either go back or drop and get trapped.
    Before the bbs encounter, we didn't know what bbs are. Our initial thoughts were to move out immediately. But then we can't afford to pay more than living in another building and when we looked at the bbs infected buildings on the map, we realized that about at least 1/3 of them are affected. And that is only those reported. Our building is not reported yet and I have no interest in doing so while living here, so I guess the infected buildings are much more than reported. I don't believe that PCO pest control is effective. If it was the bbs epidemic will not be growing. The only way, and I think this is the way of the future, is to learn how to live with their presence around. At one point the awareness and protection becomes just another habit and surviving instinct. AFAIK these creatures have been human companions since ever and for awhile they were eliminated in the developed world by poisoning all living organisms including humans which as I see it was not a solution in a long run.

  34. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 14 2011 13:20:46
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    Hi,

    Good to hear that its working for you after a few days, however it is not the long term solution you need.

    From your information I can assure you that either your upstairs or downstairs neighbour has bedbugs and if they don't them try the one on the bathroom party wall but its most likely to be up or down.

    Once theirs is resolved yours will not persist more than a few weeks after, if theirs does not get resolved then they will eventually work a way around your sealing and back into your property.

    There are communication sheets on bedbugbeware.com if you want templates to discuss with neighbours but the source needs to be tackled.

    David

  35. freefornow

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 14 2011 13:39:20
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    bed-bugscouk - 3 weeks ago  » 

    You isolate and tape up and the bedbugs will move into harder to treat places, yes you will get some drop in bite frequency but you end up with a harder problem to resolve which could spread to your neighbours or other rooms in the house. It will not stop them feeding, just make it harder for them to feed and prolong peoples suffering.

    I am currently in a high risk situation but still free and clear. Direct neighbor is being sprayed this evening and I have taken many preventative measures including mattress encasements, passive monitor and just today caulked the wall shared between apts. I have also decluttered the bed area. My thinking is that if there is no where for them to immediately run and hide in, they will climb up the bed and live in the passive monitor. This is exactly what I want them to do so I can easily detect as well as quickly remove them. Is this the best plan of action? To make the surrounding bed area undesirable for bb's and entice them to crawl up the bed and into the monitor?

  36. freefornow

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 14 2011 14:16:10
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    What should I have done in a preventative spray? Direct neighbor and 2 other apts on my floor are being sprayed this evening and I am scheduled for a preventative but I'm not sure if I should. Are there areas he should specifically target? Should I just have him focus on the wall I share with the infested apartment?

  37. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 14 2011 14:49:28
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    Hi freefornow,

    If you don't have bedbugs you don't need spraying. Its that simple.

    However if they inspect they can advise you on steps for early detection and avoidance.

    In most country's preventative spraying is technically not legal.

    David


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