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Please help troubleshoot my idea; also residual question

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  1. IWearTheScarletBB

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2007 15:22:18
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    I don't want to isolate per se, I am just trying to get the BB to cross the poison. Before my PCO comes next week, I would like to ask my husband to cut larger pieces of wood to put under each leg of all of our bedroom furniture and then have the PCO spray the heck out of the wood blocks. We have our mattress and box springs encased and will be adding another layer of encasement just in case of any holes. We will also be going over the intricate frame with a fine tooth comb WITH THE PCO since they didn't do such a great job the first time and we had to call them back a week later.

    Does anyone see a problem with the treated wood under each leg theory?

    Our PCO uses IntruderHPX and TRI-DIE, both I have found listed as residuals. I looked to see if either is a repellant, but didn't see that anywhere. The PCO says that the residual is for a month, so this second treatment (not counting the one where they were called back) is a month after the first.

    If the residual is indeed for a month, was a month too long to wait for them to come back?

  2. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2007 19:36:33
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    Hi IWear, I have no comment on the treated wood idea but perhaps others can say something helpful. Are the furniture pieces themselves not being treated?

    The residual pesticides currently available in the US may not work all that well for bedbugs, so even if they are chemically supposed to remain active for however long, a month or whatever, some bugs that come across them (later, not having been directly sprayed) may not acquire a lethal dose or may not be susceptible. So, they don't die, or at least some of them don't, and hence all our difficulties.

    Inspecting and retreating after two weeks is the recommended practice. One month is just too long. The eggs that are there and were likely unaffected by the pesticide applications will hatch, and those nymphs will have a chance to feed, to find harborage, and to just survive. Breaking the cycle becomes the goal, so that you get all the bugs before they are able to lay more eggs.

    You should address pesticide questions to Sean at thebedbugresource.com.

  3. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2007 22:44:39
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    IWear,

    I'm going to reply to your question in another post here, okay? Keep things in this thread.

    Bed isolation is sometimes referred to as protecting the bed. People get confused sometimes I've seen because they think isolating the bed is moving it away from the wall.

    An isolated bed will be completely free of bedbugs so that the person can get a good night's sleep, get relief from the stress of the infestation, and also to deny bedbugs their food source and so hope to accelerate their demise. This is accomplished by encasing both the mattress and box spring and by either cleaning or caulking or replacing the bed frame in such a way that the bed frame is free of bedbugs. Then redundant barriers are put in place (cups with mineral oil, double-sided tape, etc.) so that no bedbugs can climb up the bed. Then the person is careful not to bring any bedbugs to bed and careful not to have blankets touch the floor.

    Many people use this method. It works. The drawback is that it does not by itself kill bedbugs. The bedbugs that were not on the bed to begin with survive wherever they are. They don't just starve. They may start to come out during the day and may star to seek to bite the person in the sofa, while sitting quietly at the computer, etc.

    In your case, I truly believe that isolating your bed is impossible, given the type of bed you have. How could you ever deem it bedbug free before you isolated it, I don't see how. So, even if you wanted to, you may not be able to use this method.

    A bed that is not isolated also works. The problem is that it has to be repeatedly inspected, cleaned, treated, etc. The bugs in the frame are a particular problem and you need persistent effort to kill them. There are likely other bugs elsewhere too, and for those, the hope is that they will cross pesticides on their way to the bed and die.

    You need to think about how to treat your bed (repeatedly) if you suspect at least some harborage sites are there, and I would suspect that they are.

    What does your PCO think about the situation?

  4. IWearTheScarletBB

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2007 23:51:07
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    HelplessNM,

    I guess the part I don't understand is how an isolated bed will not kill the BB. Aren't the BB still drawn to the sleeping person in the bed where they will be forced to cross the poison/DE and die? Or does the pesticide deter them from trying to get on the bed anymore?...If so, does it still deter them even if it is not a repellant?

    Also, I have been wondering about the mineral oil. Once the BB are in it, wouldn't they get stuck in the cup...if they can't climb the bed leg, I would assume they also can't climb back out of the cup/bucket/whatever you use?

    Yes, it will be hard for us to deem our bed BB free...However, we go over the bed very thoroughly with the PCO and also go over it pretty often ourselves, so I am hopeful that it will one day be BB free. I am also hoping that the pesticide-treated blocks of wood would be a way to raise it out of the carpet (it has very wide legs that won't fit on traditional risers) with a barrier of pesticide that they are forced to cross. We haven't found a BB on our bedframe in quite a while, but had been finding a couple per day on the walls and ceiling (up until yesterday...none for the past two days...hopefully we have won a minor battle!), which is why I want them to cross poison blocks.

    The PCO says that he is sure that the problem can be taken care of, but it will take some time. He has had experience with BB, but we don't live in a big city so I am not sure that he is as educated as he could be. We did not have to bag our clothes and do some other stuff that I have since found is suggested. But, he did talk about drawing them out, so maybe that is his course of action. Before our next treatment, our bedroom will be all contained to ease in a more thorough treatment. Unfortunately, I have to leave during the treatment to take our toddler and dog out of the house, so I can't be here to drill the PCO with questions like I would like. But, I will have a list of questions for my husband to ask. He also didn't want to be up their butts while they did their jobs the last time, but after finding an area that they missed and we had to call them back out, he has changed his idea on that...he said he will be in there the whole time now.

    Thanks for your help and advice!

    I wonder if these damned BB think of me as often as I think of them?!?!?!?

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2007 0:21:23
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    Hi IWear,

    I hope I can help but I realize I may be confusing the issues more.

    "Drawing them out" is everyone's course of action. That's how bedbug treatments are intended and the way they succeed.

    In the presence of a host, bedbugs are not deterred by professionally applied pesticides, as far as we know. There may be studies that add or subtract from this statement but, in general this is what I understand.

    Yes, I believe that a person sleeping on an isolated bed is still "drawing them out," very much still acting as bait so that the bugs can cross pesticide- or dust-treated areas, hopefully acquire a sufficient dose, and then die. Sure. The problem is not that the bugs are not being drawn out. The problem is that they will not just continue to come out during the night while the person is sleeping--forever trying, but not succeeding, to get into the bed.

    Eventually, and I'm not sure how fast this happens, they come out during the day too. And, some of us think, in doing that, they may spread to other areas in the home were they previously had not set up shop. They can't get to you in your bed, so they try to get to you while you sit at your computer, and so on. Maybe they had not previously infested your computer chair, but now they likely will. So people may end up trying to put DE around their computer chair, etc. Obviously, this is very hard and people get bites and, more important, find bugs in other rooms in their home.

    When I said that isolating the bed will not in itself kill bedbugs I just meant that you cannot starve them with this method. Isolating the bed is a favored technique in IPM, to exclude and deny the bugs their food. But in practical terms it's beyond what is achievable for many people, especially if the bedbugs merely change their schedules and seek the host at other times and in other places. That's all I meant.

    I also did not mean to discourage you from isolating your bed if that is what you intend. I know that you will beat your bedbugs either way. I only meant that in the type of bed you described, with a myriad crevices and hiding locations, isolating the bed may not be achievable. Perhaps I shouldn't write that. I'm not a PCO. Your PCO should advise you in all matters.

  6. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2007 0:26:40
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    But I think you should wash and bag your clothes and linens during the infestation, whether or not your PCO suggests it. You need to ensure you are wearing clean clothes when you leave your home.

  7. IWearTheScarletBB

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2007 7:47:35
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    Thanks! Glad to finally have that cleared up about me thinking that the pesticide may deter them. What about the mineral oil...if I use a small bucket, will they get stranded inside? I just found a couple of bites on my toddler in a crib that was previously isolated.

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2007 11:50:36
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    IWear,
    If your bed, crib, etc. are properly isolated, you and your family will still be bitten when they are not IN the beds. Or if they have something on their clothing or body when they get in the bed. (So, for example, if you sit in a sofa or chair, you can be bitten. And if a bed bug crawls on your pajamas and then you get in bed, the bed bug can get in the bed.)

    You cannot stop bed bugs biting entirely while you are in your home. They will bite in broad daylight during daytime if they have no other options. And remember, just because you discover a bite at 7 am, does not mean it has not been there since the prior afternoon.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."

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