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Pest Strip Fundamentals

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  1. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 29 2013 8:24:05
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    Dear Folks,

    Because I get so many messages about the use of pest strips for bed bugs I'm providing the following fundamental information. Please note that as an independent pest management consultant that I have a professional relationship with the manufacturer of ddvp containing pest strips.

    ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS !

    Comments for your review and consideration:

    > Initially introduced by Shell Chemical, pest strips have been on the retail market since the 1960s.

    > The product is a resin strip which is impregnated with an insecticide formulation of ddvp, aka dichlorvos.

    > No, despite the rumors you may have heard, Miley Cyrus' ill advised decision to perform that "skanky ho" dance was not caused by her allegedly sniffing pest strips. My resources do believe it was due to the little reported incident of being dropped on her head soon after birth combined with having to listen to countless hours of Billy Ray Cyrus, aka her dad, so called music during her formative years. Sad but true. Consultation with the PJB M8 3000 indicates that staunch Miley fans will be disappointed by the "performer's" sudden disappearance from the public view for from twelve to eighteen months. She will then re-emerge under an assumed name, possibly Eleanor Rigby, sporting a shaved head Sinbad O'Connor look releasing new Christian/Gospel and Christmas in time for the 2015 Holiday season.

    > The ddvp insecticide is emitted from the resin strip as an invisible and odorless vapor.

    > Odor detected from the strip is due to formulation materials and not the insecticide.

    > There is no residual provided by ddvp.

    > The longevity of the product, about 120 days once placed, is due to the release of small amounts of ddvp over the life of the strips.

    > While it is a vapor, ddvp is not a true fumigant in that the vapors are not able to penetrate surfaces as fumigants such as methyl bromide (no longer marketed) and sulfuryl fluoride (marketed as Vikane and Zythor).

    > The vapors of ddvp are deadly to bed bugs and bed bug eggs. However, since bed bug eggs respire so slowly it can take many days of exposure to produce 100% mortality of viable eggs. Newly emerged nymphs and crawling bed bugs are killed rather quickly by ddvp.

    > The ddvp vapors can enter open spaces and some porous surfaces where bed bugs harbor.

    > The fundamental use of pest strips for bed bug control includes the following:
    a. Treatment should be attempted in an enclosed space of known dimensions.

    b. Place a sufficient number of strips to treat the enclosed space. Note that the large strips treat up to 1,200 cubic feet and the small strips treat up to 200 cubic feet.

    c. Depending upon the size of the treated space it takes some time before the concentration of ddvp builds to enable killing of the target pest. While ddvp will kill pests such as flying insects very quickly, pest such as bed bugs take longer to kill.

    d. The ddvp concentration will only build to a small concentration in the treated space.

    e. When treating for bed bugs using pest strips the intention is to create or apply within an enclosed space for such treatment.

    f. Items that folks are treating for bed bugs include such items that cannot be laundered such as furniture, electronics and other such things.

    g. Some people ask about placing clothing into plastic trash bags along with a pest strip. Generally it will be easier, quicker and less costly to heat treat such clothing and garments using a dryer.

    h. How long does it take to kill bed bugs with pest strips? Crawling bed bugs are killed rather quickly with ddvp vapors. The younger the bed bug, the quicker it will be killed. However, individual bed bug mortality results can vary. Eggs take much longer to kill than the crawlers do. As we are all interested and need to assure 100% control the labels indicate seven days treatment time to allow for 100% control of eggs.

    i. Are ddvp pest strips the "silver bullet" for bed bugs? There are no silver bullets for bed bugs. In my experience and observation I am aware of many folks who are having great success using pest strips for bed bug control however, there are those who may "think it works like magic". It doesn't. As an example, we cannot expect these strips to penetrate non-porous surfaces, kill bed bugs in a shorter time than required nor overcome application errors. Remember, we cannot kill any bed bugs with any insecticide that is not properly applied to the areas where the bed bugs are located.

    j. How can I best use pest strips for bed bugs? Basically we need to have a sufficient amount of ddvp strips for the size of the space being treated and we need to assure that the space being treated will sufficiently hold the ddvp within.

    k. What are suitable enclosed spaces? There are any number of suitable enclosed spaces which may be created or used for such purposes including but not limited to: plastic trash bags, plastic storage bins, plastic sheeting, a closet, a room, a trailer a storage shed and other such areas. What is most important is that the space is sealed, not over stuffed nor overly disturbed during treatment.

    l. How does the ddvp vapor kill bed bugs? The ddvp vapors are a neurotoxin which are inhaled by the bed bugs during treatment. Since bed bugs are tiny animals/insects, very little is needed to produce mortality as compared to a higher animal.

    m. Are these pest strips dangerous? Not when used properly. We need to remember that any pesticide can be dangerous when not properly used and that the key components of hazard are dosage and exposure. Simply stated, in any pest strip there simply is not enough active ingredient to be a hazard under normal use.

    n. When treatment is completed the treated space should be ventilated with fresh air. In my experience this is best accomplished using suitable fans to ventilate the area.

    o. How much insecticide is applied by these strips? The math can be tough to understand for some but here's how it works. 1) As per label the strips contain 18.6% of ddvp. 2) The strips emit the ddvp over 120 days. 3) The strips are available in 65 gram and 16 gram sizes. 4) At the end of 120 days the strips will emit about 50% of the insecticide load. 5) Based upon the math the large strip will emit about 0.043 grams per day and the small strip will emit about 0.012 grams per day. Note that there are 454 grams per pound and about 28.4 grams per ounce.

    Please advise if any questions or concerns.

    I hope this information helps ! paul b.

  2. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 29 2013 10:05:50
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    Dear Mr. Bello,

    Very interesting and informative post, thank you. I have always (well at least since becoming aware of bed bugs and the fact that I think they are potentially everywhere) been extremely interested in ddvp pest strips because - even though you say they are not the silver bullet against bed bugs – I personally feel that they are the closest thing to a silver bullet that a lay person has accessibility to . . . especially if Vikane treatments are not available in a person's area.

    Therefore, some initial questions please (not to say I won't think of more because, as stated, I am extremely interested in this topic!):

    1. I know you routinely say "you can only kill each bug once" . . . but my question is: If you have a space and said dimensions of such space say to use one large pest strips, can I use . . . say . . . three pest strips? (I'm assuming you will say "there is no reason to do that." I understand that, but my question is would there be any reason I couldn't do that in a space not occupied and if I properly ventilate/air out everything afterward?) Example: There is some furniture a relative wants me to store, I am not comfortable bringing any furniture into my house. Therefore, I decide to rent a "POD" and use pest strips. Directions say use one pest strip . . . I decide to use three to make sure couch, couch cushions, mattresses, etc. are all properly "fumigated" (I know that's not the correct word) so let's say "treated" . . . I would be extremely worried that the vapors of the pest strips would not penetrate couch cushions, couch padding, etc. . . . so more could be better!! ??

    2. Car scenario: Kinda, sorta the same question but different. Everything I have read is that Vikane and heat treatments on cars are not 100% effective because there are fire walls, "cool" spots, etc. Ok, in my mind, the difference with pest strips would be/could be potentially that you could place them in a car for an extended period of time (weeks or even months – if the longevity of the product is 120 days then theoretically one could leave in place for approximately four months – which is a shorter period of time than the 18 months of trying to starve them out) where I'm hoping if you use more than the recommended amount it could/would potentially work? So . . . my question is: If I wanted to treat a car with pest strips . . . would it increase my odds of working (or would it work) if I used more strips than the directions state and left the strips in for a longer period of time? (And I believe I would have to use a fan to circulate the air.)

    3. And something I've never understood in previous pest strip discussions . . . I believe you have always said that the area has to be "closed/sealed off"? I don't completely understand that because I believe I have read that they can be used in attics and storage sheds (and you say a trailer in your post). How is one going to "seal off" an attic or a trailer? I understand sealing off the door but what about the floor? Or would the use in an attic be for other pest beside bed bugs? But then that leaves a trailer . . . how do you seal off a trailer/mobile home? (I'm thinking of mostly floors, but what about windows too? Do you have to put plastic over every window and door and the underside of the mobile home?

    4. You say "pest strips" and I immediately think of "Nuvan" . . . but I think I have read other posters say they have bought other ddvp strips at their local "home" stores . . . are they the same thing and I would just look for the AI (dichlorvos)?

    Sorry if too many questions, but I did warn you that I find ddvp strips extremely interesting in the war against bed bugs!!

    And, hey . . . if you want to skype regarding this . . . I'll send you a PM! (Sorry, that was a joke directed at another expert!)

  3. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 29 2013 10:41:59
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    OK, good questions, my responses are below as per your numbers above:

    1. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS ! Perhaps you missed reading that in my post above. Note that the manufacturers of pesticide products spend significant resources to establish the label rates. These rates are the cost effective rates which deliver the efficacy results for their products based upon many replicable scientific protocol studies.

    As an example here: In essence the manufacturer states on their label: "Use one pound of product per 1,000 square feet to kill xyz pest."

    However, you've basically asked, despite the label language: "Is it OK to use three pounds of product?"

    We need to note that professional licensed applicators have a moral, ethical and regulatory required obligation to read, understand and follow the label language of the pesticides they apply at customer's locations. In fact, they open themselves up to liability issues as well as regulatory compliance and enforcement concerns should they decide to not follow a product label.

    Conversely, laypersons or homeowners such as yourself are not professionally licensed nor can we expect that the application regulatory department of their state to inspect or oversee what a homeowner chooses to do at their own home. As such, the practical answer is that any homeowner can pretty much choose to do whatever he/she wishes. However, it is NOT necessary to apply any pesticide in quantities that exceed the labeled rates. This is so because we know that the labeled rates will produce the desired results. Plus, while we can only kill a bed bug once, perhaps it is better to think of any pesticide applied in excess of what the product label states as an unnecessary and avoidable waste of your own money !

    2. Automobile scenario. Hmmm . . . (OK, just so you know, I'm just now thinking that we need a policy that limits all questions to like 25 words or less !)

    To attain 100% mortality of bed bugs in an infested car is more a problem of application or delivery than any other factor.

    Remember that the even the bed bug killer product in the entire world is not going to kill bed bugs in your bedroom if applied in your kitchen.

    With automobiles there are many nooks & crannies where bed bugs might hide and escape treatment. This said, it is more about about being thorough than what product or how long the application duration is.

    Additionally, everything a competent pro needs to eliminate bed bugs in your house can be found in any Home Depot, Lowes or Ace Hardware. This is so because these folks know what the hell they're doing and not so much about what's available on the shelves.

    3. Closed or sealed off is the ideal. Think of a room being treated as if it were a one gallon sprayer. In this sprayer you've added one ounce of pesticide to create a 1.0% solution of pesticide as per the label. However, every time you spray a bit of it, someone else opens your sprayer and adds more water. This will result in a reduction of the 1.0% solution concentration which will effect the application efficacy.

    With ddvp vapors the enclosed space is your one gallon sprayer. If there are sources of fresh air entering the enclosed space then the concentration of ddvp vapors is reduced.

    And yes, the product label allows for storage sheds, attics, crawl spaces, basements and other areas however, the bed bug label section directions are separate from the general use directions and are intended to provide suitable guidance for bed bug control.

    4. As mentioned above pest strips containing ddvp were first introduced by Shell Chemical in the 1960s as a retail product and have been market available to consumers ever since. In fact ddvp was also marketed in pet flea collars for many years. Commercial applicators purchase these strips marketed under the brand name Nuvan. The Nuvan prostrips are sold in the professional pest management market and have bed bugs on the label. Retail brand name pest strips marketed under the hot shot and other brand names. Some of these retail brands may have bed bugs on their label, others do not.

    Note that this is not a unique situation. Many pesticide products are marketed under different names, formulations and pack sizes to the professional market vs. the retail market. For the most part, many of the general use pesticide product active ingredients are available on the retail market as well but marketed with certain differences vs. their professional counterparts.

    5. So now I'm wondering why you didn't have any questions about the Miley Ray Cyrus situation?

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  4. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 29 2013 11:04:17
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    Here is a question received and my response below: (note this has been redacted for obvious reasons.)

    Q: Hi Paul, hope all is well. A few questions/comments in regard to your post.
    1 In discussion with some students at a recent XXXXXXXXXXX meeting there was some discussion about a XXX study which had less than 100% mortality of eggs.

    2. In many of the stuff clothing in bags and throw in a strip scenarios I am concerned that
    A it may not address all areas of items to be treated and hence introduction
    B Over use in apartments and vapors escape into living space.
    I realize this is not the old Vapona EC that we used to use bot still.
    Thanks for your time. XXXXXXXXXXX

    Response:
    I am often asked this question.

    Clearly, there are few active ingredients that work as well at killing bed bugs than does ddvp. In my view, it simply "smokes em".

    However, as stated numerous times previously, ddvp is not magic nor it is a true fumigant.

    Occasionally I conduct a useful "live demonstration" for purposes of showing the efficacy of pest strips for such uses. In this demonstration a small piece of pest strip of approximately 1/2 inch square is suspended near the center of a ten gallon fish tank using thread. Within the tank are a variety of things including: numerous feeder crickets that are free to roam the tank plus jars containing crickets configured as follows: jars with 1/64th, 1/16th and 1/8th inch gaps in their respective plexi-glass jar covers, a jar with a layer of tee shirt material over it affixed with a rubber band, a jar with a layer of paper towel and a jar with a solid piece of plexi-glass covering it.

    This tank is positioned on a table at the front of the room for all to observe during the training session to see what happens. So, what happens? And, why crickets?

    Well, crickets are used because feeder crickets are widely available at pet stores and, generally speaking, hotels and other such facilities are a tad hesitant to allow the use of bed bugs in such demonstrations.

    What happens: Over time all the crickets are killed except the ones in the jar with the solid lid/cover. This is so because the ddvp vapors are able to reach these insects, become inhaled and the chemistry does the rest.

    So, why did the study mentioned above not product 100% mortality? That this occurred is effectively demonstrated by the demonstration described here above. Simply stated, ddvp will not be able to kill any bed bugs that it cannot reach. In fact, no pesticide will kill any pest it cannot reach.

    When placing objects within plastic bags or any other treatment enclosed space there MUST be a sufficient amount of open air space to allow the ddvp vapors to move about and get to the areas where the bed bugs are harboring. As such, this is an application issue and not a product efficacy issue.

    Please advise if any additional questions or concerns.

    Thanks for your question, hope this helps and I hope that you and yours are doing very well ! paul b.

  5. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 29 2013 14:51:02
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    Thank you for your response.

    Follow-up questions on using ddvp pest strips for treatment . . .

    How would you, being the expert that you are, go about "sealing" the following?

    1) PODs: I would think PODs are supposed to be airtight as you are supposed to be able to sit them outside and store all your belongings in them . . .meaning rain should not be able to get in, so would you bother sealing the door or seams? (Not 25 words or less)

    2) Sheds: Seal the edges of the door with tape or seal the entire door with plastic and tape and then look for daylight coming through any holes and cover with tape plastic? (Not 25 words or less (but close))

    3) Mobile Homes: Not bother with windows because they are supposed to be air tight or cover with plastic? Not bother with the exterior door because that should be airtight or cover with plastic? Flooring? Are you saying that you think the underside of a mobile home would have to be covered with plastic . . . or would that be overkill and couldn't you just use more product to combat the potential air issue? (Understanding that you cannot advise to use more product than what the label says to use!) (Not 25 words or less)

    Apparently, unbeknownst to me . . . I have a problem with the 25 words or less request!

    ALSO, all my scenarios are in UNOCCUPIED situations . . . not apartments and not in an area/room in a home where other parts of the home are to be occupied during treatment. So . . . . in those situations, and given the cricket scenario . . . is it your expert opinion that if you seal a room/closet/space up properly in either a home or apartment that ddvp strips can be utilized because it will not penetrate a closed container?

    If so, and someone was wanting to treat items in a closet/room/space in either an apartment or home . . . would you "seal" off air vents/ducts and/or electrical outlets? What if there are bed bugs hiding in the air vents and electrical outlets and you seal them off? So seal off air vents but not electrical outlets because the vapors would not get into the next room via electrical outlets???

    SEE . . . endless questions on this topic as I am intrigued by it!!

    Questions regarding the MRC situation:

    1) Did you find said performance to be as awkward as I found it?

    2) Did you find said performance to be as icky as I found it?

    3) Did you find said performance to be one of the least sexy attempts at being sexy that I found it to be?

    Thank you in advance for any input . . . however, please don't bash MRC's hot daddy (but thank goodness he got rid of the mullet)!

  6. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 29 2013 15:27:26
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    OK, responses provided as per the question number above:

    1. I'd likely use packing tape.

    2. Sheds: Firstly, I'd likely not use a shed for bed bug purposes. However, if need be, plastic sheeting, duct tape and other such materials might serve the purpose to create a temporary sealed container type location.

    3. Mobile Homes, Trailers, etc. : Actually the ones I'm familiar with have a suitably sealed floor already. This said, we need to understand the limitations of our application methodologies and products used therein.

    As such, let's take my deer camp trailer as an example. If this was infested with bed bugs and/or I were to use it as a treatment space the following would need to be done so suitably address the limitations and logistical challenges:

    > Seal the ceiling vent fan.

    > Dust the utility penetrations.

    > Apply residual liquids to the cracks & crevices of the floor and other moldings.

    Boom, done and ready to go !

    "Also" (this question was not numbered. Going forward, all questions must be numbered and 25 words or less !)

    DDVP is a vapor and not a true fumigant. it is not able to pass through walls or non-porous surfaces. As such, ddvp strips placed within a normal closet do not present an exposure hazard to those who might occupy the room on the opposite side of the closet wall provided that the wall is contiguous and absent of holes. There have already been studies to address and determine this.

    The remaining misc questions:

    > When using or treating a normal room both the intake and outlet HVAC vents should be sealed. This is so because we do not want to either draw ddvp treatment vapors into the hvac system or introduce additional non-treated air into the treated space.

    > If the room was actually being treated for bed bugs I'd recommend the removal of all utility penetration covers, such as the HVAC grates, to expose the hidden gap/void area. This area should be treated with a suitable dust and then sealed with a suitable material. The hvac vent would then be sealed to prevent non-treated air intrusion and/or translocation of ddvp treatment vapors from the treated space.

    > We would not expect bed bugs to actually hide "within the air ducts" as this would be an adverse environment for them. It is the space between the duct and the inner wall void that needs too be treated and then sealed.

    > Same deal for the electric outlets. Not because the ddvp would get into the outlets but because it is difficult to get product into the wall void if not purposefully treated. A dust is great for such areas.

    Miley Ray:

    1. Awkward ? Hmmm . . . I'm not a huge fan so, awkward would be an understatement for me.

    2. icky? Disturbing and wrong on so many levels.

    3. Hmmm . . . Yeah, it was weird for sure and the combination of that Robyn guy + Miley was simply not working for sure.

    Hot Daddy? Ah, not so much but maybe for just you girls.

    There ya go ! pjb

  7. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 29 2013 16:02:06
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    P Bello - 32 minutes ago  » 
    "Also" (this question was not numbered. Going forward, all questions must be numbered and 25 words or less !)

    Don't worry. No more questions (25 words or less or otherwise) regarding pest strips, Miley Cyrus, or otherwise!

  8. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 29 2013 16:04:48
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    However, multiple choice questions would be greatly appreciated and save a lot of time too !

    pjb

  9. bugs45454541

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Sep 4 2013 14:01:09
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    P Bello

    I came accross this post as I am planning on bagging my 2 couches and putting in pest strips. After a couple of weeks I will remove the bags. I live in a studio apartment and live/work/sleep/eat/etc. all in one place.

    What is your suggestion for time to air out the apartment after removing the bags? Will simply opening the windows and placing fans for a couple of hours do the trick?

    Thanks in advance.

  10. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Sep 4 2013 16:32:21
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    Dear bugs45,

    I'm assuming the following:

    > You will have removed the dust cover from the bottom of the couches for inspection and treatment access to the framework beneath the couches. Note that this is where bed bugs may harbor and remain hidden.

    > The couches will be well sealed within the bags for treatment purposes.

    > You will treat the couch cushions in a separate bag or container.

    > You will need to assure that there is adequate head or air space within the treatment bags such that the vapors may move within the bag to areas where bed bugs may be located.

    > Note that there is no residual insecticide activity once the pest strips are removed.

    > The treatment vapors you will be applying will remain sealed within the treatment bag/container.

    For ventilation:

    * Use your fan(s) to blow air out a window or door from the treatment area.

    * Have an open door or window located across the room/apartment into which fresh air will be sucked into the area to be ventilated such that the suspect air is exhausted to the exterior and fresh air is drawn in in a "cross ventilation" type configuration.

    * Since the treatment will be contained and limited to your couches, your ventilation time will be less than if you treated your entire home or say, the living room.

    * Without seeing and measuring the configuration you propose, it would seem to me that two hours of ventilation would be more than adequate provided sufficient cross ventilation is attained and the bagged vapors are sufficiently vented to the exterior.

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  11. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Sep 4 2013 18:32:48
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    Call me overly cautious, but I don't think I would use these strips in a studio apartment where I'd be sleeping right next to the bagged up sofas.

    They
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    = TAOT
  12. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Sep 4 2013 18:48:32
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    The integrity of the bag(s) needs to be maintained and the bag(s) need to be sealed.

    If concerns remain, you could also maintain an open window to provide additional fresh air ventilation from the exterior.

    This product has been on the retail market since introduced by shell chemical in the 1960s.

    Those with concerns or additional issues that science and logic cannot overcome can simply "opt out" as there are other alternative methodologies which may be implemented to successfully eliminate bed bugs.

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  13. bugs45454541

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Sep 4 2013 21:53:37
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    P Bello, thanks very much for your help. You pointed out alot of things I didnt think of.

    Outthere thank you for your concerns. I will need to be cautious about making sure it is air tight.

  14. P Bello

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    Thu Sep 5 2013 8:05:34
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    Dear bugs45,

    You can always "double bag" the couches if that will meet your concerns.

    Note that the hot shot folks sell a mattress treatment kit on the retail market. It includes a sufficiently large plastic bag and a pest strip.

    Dear taot,

    I suppose being "overly cautious" is OK however, we simply don't need to be apprehensive of "everything pesticides" just because they are pesticides without consideration of the actual science and potential hazard involved.

    Potential hazard is a product of dosage & exposure. While this is the "headline" there are many factors to know and understand and a myriad of examples which underscore and support that the careful a proper use of pesticide products mitigates hazard risk.

    In this situation, two pest strips, one for each couch, applied in enclosed plastic bags assuredly mitigates potential risks.

    Additionally, the amount of insecticide emitted each day by these strips is a small amount as is the overall total amount present within each strip.

    ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS !

    Note that I have a professional relationship with manufacturers of pest strips.

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  15. P Bello

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    Thu Sep 5 2013 8:06:53
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    Dear bugs45,

    Let me know if you have any additional questions regarding your planned treatment.

    pjb

  16. jc364

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    Sun Oct 27 2013 18:16:49
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    Hi P Bello,

    Thank you for all the information you have provided.

    I plan on using DDVP strips to treat bookshelf items; my current plan is to put the books into trash bags with a ddvp strip, and then put the bags into plastic totes to store off-site in a storage unit. The totes will remain in storage for several weeks while we prepare to move. I assume that I will need one strip per bag? Is there any harm to having 4 or 5 separate bags in the storage unit each bag having its own strip?

    Thanks again!

  17. NY Bug Man

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Oct 28 2013 17:20:36
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    Very interesting and informative. This should be a sticky, if it isnt already.

  18. Scared in BK

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    Wed Jul 30 2014 9:53:05
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    Hi P Bello,

    When you say "Odor detected from the strip is due to formulation materials and not the insecticide." What do you mean by "formulation materials?" If there is an odor, is there need to be concern?

    To further explain my situation, my wife started getting bites 2 months ago. We brought a dog in which confirmed we had the beginnings of bed bugs. The apartment was treated and we had about 15 bags/bins of things that were treated with Nuvan strips. The bags (double bagged construction bags) and bins (taped off bins) have been in storage with the strips since.

    Since we live in NYC it is bit harder to air these things out. Our plan is to bring everything to our friends back yard in NJ to air everything out for 4 hours. Do you think this is ample time to rid everything of any residual fumes/vapors? We have a 18 month old baby and our main concern is her. We do not want to bring everything back into our apartment if there is a chance that the DDVP fumes/vapors could still be in the items.

    Any guidance would be much appreciated.

  19. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jul 30 2014 23:19:57
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    NY Bug Man - 9 months ago  » 
    Very interesting and informative. This should be a sticky, if it isnt already.

    Actually, it should be a FAQ, rather than a sticky. I have it on my list. Feel free to add any additional questions or tips (or, for that matter, concerns! We like balanced FAQs...)

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  20. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jul 31 2014 11:02:14
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    Dear BK,

    See my responses below:

    (Please note that I'm on an un-vacation, don't ask, so, I may be a tad slow responding this week kids !)

    Hi P Bello,

    Q: When you say "Odor detected from the strip is due to formulation materials and not the insecticide." What do you mean by "formulation materials?"

    R: The emulsifiers and such. These items are usually the "inert ingredients" which are not the pesticide active ingredient.

    Q: If there is an odor, is there need to be concern?

    R: Concern yes. Overly concerned and panic, no. There is no residual with this product and once the strip is removed there is no continued source thereof. Suitable ventilation is all that is required. If you're personal concerns remain note that water & humidity are enemies of ddvp and cause rapid hydralization. As such, you could simply wipe items with a damp rag/paper towel or wash with water.

    Q To further explain my situation, my wife started getting bites 2 months ago. We brought a dog in which confirmed we had the beginnings of bed bugs. The apartment was treated and we had about 15 bags/bins of things that were treated with Nuvan strips. The bags (double bagged construction bags) and bins (taped off bins) have been in storage with the strips since.

    R: OK, this is good.

    Q: Since we live in NYC it is bit harder to air these things out. Our plan is to bring everything to our friends back yard in NJ to air everything out for 4 hours.

    R: Whoa ! NJ? Have you ever smelled NJ ? NJ and you're worried about odor? WTF !
    Actually, all you need do is open these bags in a well ventilated area or outdoors. If practical, you could simply open the bags while standing on the sidewalk outside your building. However, I realize that this may not be practical. And, if you're not able to open windows in your apartment then perhaps the NJ option is best for you.

    Q: Do you think this is ample time to rid everything of any residual fumes/vapors?

    R: Yes. Also refer to the Nuvan FAQs which are available via this link below:

    [non-working link deleted]

    Q: We have a 18 month old baby and our main concern is her.

    R: Of course, safety is a primary concern !

    Q: We do not want to bring everything back into our apartment if there is a chance that the DDVP fumes/vapors could still be in the items.

    R: DDVP vapors are not persistent and will not be present after the treated items are ventilated.

    Q: Any guidance would be much appreciated.

    R: Let me know if any additional questions or concerns.

    Hope this helps you ! pjb

  21. noyouretheworst

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Oct 5 2016 9:53:28
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    i am sorry to necro this thread but i had a question that relates tot his. I live in canada and the product i purchased with DDVP in it does not contain information on doseage. So for example it only comes in 65grams and is 19% i am trying to figure out if i should use half the strip (or less) in a 65L container. (or for later when i put my other items in larger contractor bags when i put them in storage)

    Is there a standard formula to calculate this?

  22. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Thu Oct 6 2016 2:02:39
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    P Bello is the expert on DDVP. He doesn't post here often now so the best thing to do would be to try clicking "old timer" under P Bello's username next to one of his posts. Then you can contact him via his website which is listed in his profile. Please us know what you find out.


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