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PCO treated 3 times and still have bed bugs

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  1. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2012 20:46:18
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    My family moved into a rental unit in October.
    Within a few days I noticed I was being eaten alive.
    I went to my family doctor and she thought it was bed bugs.

    After some quick google searches and calling my local
    Health department, I began to search for the little boogers.
    I found a few on the mattress.

    My landlord paid for the extermination.
    I followed the PCO directions.
    We washed and dried all clothing and bedding.
    We threw away anything that could not be laundered.
    They started treatment around October 16th.
    They treated in 3 week intervals for a total of 3 treatments.

    From what I can tell they used Bedlam on the furniture and some overall spray for the entire house. They covered the mattresses with a mattress cover while they treated.
    It wasn't a sealed cover, just like a fitted sheet.
    During the past moths we stayed elsewhere until the PCO
    Was completely finished. So we didn't stay in the house
    Between treatments.

    We stayed at the house for 3 days.
    I bought new bedding and any clothing we moved back in was laundered.

    We still have bed bugs. They are terrible.

    I called the PCO and he told me I must have brought them back in.
    He is coming tomorrow to check the house.

    My question is, who is to blame?
    I threw out all bedding and bought new. Pillows blankets everything.
    Clothing was laundered and sealed and immediately taken to a storage facility.
    Upon returning it was laundered again.

    Some things that raise my doubts regarding the PCO:
    1- he argued that bed bugs are attracted to heat more than CO2
    2- he didn't pull any outlet covers or switch plates
    3- he didn't seal the mattresses in any way

    Input please

  2. nervousbreakdown

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2012 21:00:53
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    You live in a house with no neighbours, right ? You don't share a wall with another house ?

    You say that you didn't stay home during the treatment, does it mean during a long time ?
    If you were away, it means that BB couldn't find "food" so they may have hibernated or something and couldn't walk in remanent spray ?

    Have you tried to find 'nest' ? Have you ever found one ?

    I read A LOT of BB stories and when treatment is a failure, a lot of PCO say that "the treatment is not a failure, YOU brought them again". Can't they just face the fact that, well, the treatment "may" be a failure ?

    It's a long war, you have to be patient and I hope that you'll get some answers !

  3. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2012 21:07:03
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    Thank you for your response.

    It is a single family home. So no neighbors sharing walls.
    My sons room seems to be the worst.
    We put his bunk bed up when we moved in in October.
    2 days later the biting ensued.

    I haven't found a nest. Where do I look?
    The outlets? The baseboards?

  4. bedbugsuptown

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2012 21:12:39
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    We stayed
    I bought new bedding and any clothing we moved back in was laundered.

    I

    called the PCO and he told me I must have brought them back in.
    He is coming tomorrow to check the house.

    Hi dmjohnson3

    Sorry to read this most recent development in your story.
    When you say that you stayed at the house for 3 days do you mean when you returned to it(after approx. nine weeks based on your treatments being 3 wks apart) with freshly laundered and dried on high clothes and new bedding?

    Where did you stay?

    I'm not a pco, however, in my experience when treatment fails and you complain the pco will grasp at any piece of straw that may appear to validate his work.

    If you could post a little more information, particularly about where you stayed and for how long it might be useful. Lightning can strike twice as they say--that's why I'm asking.

    Once you've added some more details another poster, perhaps one of the pro's that frequent the boards will be able to help you figure out what's going on. Best of luck, bedbugs are not forever--least not in one place!

  5. bedbugsuptown

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2012 21:27:57
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    dmjohnson3

    My infestation began and ended in the bunk bed. My daughter was on the bottom bunk getting a lot of bites. When the pco came fecal stains were immediately found to be around holes that had no screws in the bottom bunks frame (where the edges of the mattress are held) My pco thought it would be a good idea to remove the long vertical canvas strips that held together the net of horizontal slats supporting the mattress on both sides of the bunk.

    That's alot of staples to pull out! I found way more stray staples than bbs. for months, but know is not the time to wise crack. If your bunk beds are designed like mine I recommend removing the canvas. It's a great place for bbs. to hide.

    Bed bugs will in time get around, but for the most part they stay near the bed, where people sleep. After all, they're nasty little vampires that suck blood. I'm not 100% on this but my understanding is that bbs. usually stay within 3 feet of the bed.

  6. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2012 21:28:07
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    We stayed at my mothers. She is almost OCD regarding bugs and clutter.
    She made sure we bought new shoes and had everything
    Laundered on high heat.

    We stayed away for 11 weeks. During that time not one single big bite.

    And after 11 weeks we stayed in the house for 3 days.
    My son had 4 bites the first night. He got 10 more the second night.
    The third night I slept in his bed and he slept in mine.
    I got 9 bites that night.

  7. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2012 22:36:34
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    I did call a few other PCOs a few days ago.
    Terminix, Orkin, and a local mom and pop place.
    All 3 told me the mattresses need to be in a sealed bed bug proof mattress cover.

    Orkin and Terminix told me the warranty they offer was void if the customer removed the mattress cover.

  8. arianacassie

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2012 23:07:31
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    I will never buy another bunk bed. Our infestation was the bunk bed , his mattress was not too bad but wow the slats and the screw holes were filled with eggs. As stated above they seem to find every nook and cranny of a bunk. In the end i couldnt even look at it and had to get rid of it. I would take it apart and get the PCO to completely spray it EVERYWHERE. Where i am i couldnt afford a PCO so i had to do it myself hence the throwing it out. There are so many places for them to hide ......

  9. nikki

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 0:23:43
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    Ariannacassie, DMJohnson and Bedbugsuptown, I'm just curious - I was planning on buying the IKEA metal bunk beds for my kids - were any of yours like these? I just wonder what makes bunk beds so vulnerable.

    And DM, good luck.

    Thanks,
    Nikki

  10. endless_nightmare

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 2:46:57
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    nervousbreakdown - 5 hours ago  » 

    I read A LOT of BB stories and when treatment is a failure, a lot of PCO say that "the treatment is not a failure, YOU brought them again". Can't they just face the fact that, well, the treatment "may" be a failure ?

    Oh my God, how often have I heard that, or "are you sure it's still bedbugs?" this when they are still walking around in the place.

    Or PCO 1 saying PCO 2 is total crap and doesn't know what he is talking about. Or PCO 1 saying the exact opposite to PCO 2 about treating bedbugs

    what a nightmare

    Andrea
    not a PCO
    Spinal Cord Injury Advocacy/Volunteer
  11. bedbugsuptown

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 4:06:32
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    Hi nikki,

    My pco thought it would be a good idea to remove the long vertical canvas strips that held together the net of horizontal slats supporting the mattress on both sides of the bunk.

    From the description given by arianacassie, our bunk beds appear to be of similar design. Assuming I'm correct based on her description these bunk beds are not metal but wood. Mine are wood unless I hallucinate and I don't.

    Yes bunk beds, and I'm speaking of bunk beds made of wood contain many areas in which bbs. can harbor. As both of us mentioned there are small crochet sized drilled holes in the frame that are not closed with screws. Don't know why they drill so many and make no use of them. My beds with many empty holes are filled at all corners of the frame, perhaps another one in the middle of each long side. The quote at the beginning of this post is from my second post on this thread and goes into a bit more detail about the dynamics of this style bunk bed.

    Obviously bunk beds are ideal for people with kids and anyone with limited space.

    Just did a quick google to see the metal Ikea bunk beds. They appear to have the typical surround frame to hold the mattress, but unlike wood bunk beds the one image that showed a bit of the under carriage did not have the bunk bed hammock if you will. The Ikea bed simply had metal bars like ribbon on a large rectangular gift box, a giant cross, horizontal and vertical--very good.

    With the wood beds they commonly have a connected network of horizontally spaced slats to further support the mattress in the frame. These slats are connected and held in place by long canvas strips (like the canvas in old style venetian blinds) I removed the canvas as bugs could hide under it and would be well protected from visual detection and perhaps even some from chemicals. It was not a problem. It simply means that when I put fresh linens on I might have to push the unhinged slats a bit to reorganize them.

    I did not have to get rid of my bunk beds, my lower bunk was the only bunk where live bugs were found during my infestation, which really doesn't say much. My infestation was fairly mild, caught fairly early with treatment beginning approximately 3 weeks after my daughter began to manifest bites.

    As for bunk beds being problematic, I would have to disagree, particularly if you are planning on buying the Ikea type with no network of connected slats. Again and again I have read here on the forum about the horrors of finding a box spring, after being ripped open revealing bugs and more bugs. A bunk bed has no box spring.

    jeeze louise, what a long post to promote Ikea. disclaimer* I have no connection nor do I profit in any way from the Ikea Corporation.

  12. nervousbreakdown

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 5:21:22
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    dmjohnson3 - 7 hours ago  » 
    Thank you for your response.
    It is a single family home. So no neighbors sharing walls.
    My sons room seems to be the worst.
    We put his bunk bed up when we moved in in October.
    2 days later the biting ensued.
    I haven't found a nest. Where do I look?
    The outlets? The baseboards?

    Well it's a good thing that you have no neighbours ! Once, the BB are totally gone, you won't have to be scared that they would come back from neighbours.

    During the BEDBUGS WAR, the PCO does his job.
    But you have to do yours too.

    That is A LOT of job.
    You need to check every single object that is in the infested room, not just the clothes.
    You need to check especially what is close to the bed. But not only if the bugs finally scattered all around the infested room. I guess your PCO gave you some advices / informations / stuff to do.
    Yes, it drives crazy. Really. It turns you into a really paranoid person. I hope you'll be strong enough anyway.

    For example, in my own appartement / room, I found "nests" in : bed, mattress, clothes and in others places like frames, an old hat, an old typewriter (!), holes in walls, books and I bet there are a lot of others places I still can't find (even if I try to check every singl day!!). But keep in mind that my infestation is a heavy one ; yours might not be that bad !

    Buying a mattress cover is a first good thing.

    Unfornutaly, that's just the way it is, you need to work yourself a lot and constantly to eradicate. The PCO is not the panacea. It will helps but you also need to be really active.

    I know your first question was to know if your PCO was right or not but I can't answer it properly as I don't have the answer. I just can give you some pieces of advice.

    (And, just for information if you think my english is a bit weird, you would be right as I am french and my english is not fluent ! It's pretty hard and frustrating to express myself in english, I can't say whatever I want.)

  13. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 9:01:02
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    When we left in October there were 2 things left in his room; a bed and a desk.
    In fact, the only thing left in the entire house was furniture.
    We had just moved in. So there was nothing to see on the furniture. It had to be in the walls.
    And I do know it was bed bugs because I caught one.

  14. paranoid BB freak

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 10:18:42
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    Perhaps the issue is that there was no one at the house while it was treated. With no available 'meal', the bugs will not come out, and therefore will not cross the poison and die.

  15. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 10:37:08
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    The PCO just came. He said the problem had to be in the mattresses.
    When I asked him about mattress covers he said it was a gimmick.
    He claimed the other PCOs were using it as a way to sell me something I didn't need.

    I also asked about pulling the outlet covers and switch plates.
    He replied that when he sprays none of that needs to be removed.

    I am furious.

  16. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 11:24:28
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    Dear dmj,

    At first look, when I read your topic headline: "PCO Treated 3 Times and Still Have Bed Bugs"

    my gut response is; then get another pco.

    However, we all know that is easy to say and ignorant of the necessary allocation of limited resources over numerous needed expenditures, isn't it? That is, we all don't have unlimited sources of funds to spend on bed bug remediation.

    A few comments for your consideration based upon the information read above:

    > It's great to pay with your CC these days as nearly all CC companies protect their consumer customers. In dealing with a recent case, the consumer called the CC company and they are providing a refund. Conversely the CC company does not wish to support vendors who do not provide suitale goods & services to their card members.

    > Please note that if a bed bug crosses a dried swath of insecticide application (say a 12 to 18 inch band) it is unlikely that it will pick up a suuficient quantity of insecticide to produce mortality. This does NOT mean that the insecticide is ineffective, it merely means that the lethal dose was not efficiently delivered as needed. This underscores why it is most important to treat the harborage areas such that the bed bugs will be in contacted with residual treated surfaces for extended periods of time thus resulting in mortality.

    > Encasements: it seems you already have your answers on this issue.

    > Is there any warranty service being provided after the three treatments? (Excuse me if i missed that point above, I'm kinda-sorta skim reading to catch up.)

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  17. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 11:34:25
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    Paul, I was given a 6 month guarantee.
    However, if all they are doing is laying down a spray pesticide and nothing more I don't see how this is effective.
    Are you saying mattress covers are ineffective?
    The exterminators I called say it is a must. None offered to sell me theirs.
    They advised me to buy them online.

  18. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 12:15:14
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    Dear dmj,

    Mattress & box spring encasements are a must !

    I recommend the Mattress Safe brand for the following reasons:

    > Good quality & durability of construction.

    > The side/vertical panels are stretchable such that you need not measure the height of your mattress, you just need to know: twin, xtra long twin, queen, king, CA king, etc.

    > You can get them online direct.

    (Note: I have a professional relationship with the manufacturer of Mattress Safe encasements however, I receive no compensation due to encasement product sales.)

    > Did you pay be CC ?

    > Check out the Resource tab above and review information there. Check out "Over 201 Things to Know About bed Bugs" and other articles as this will give you a basis on how to control bed bugs.

    > I agree with your point; what good is a warranty if the work being done has no chance of being successful? If this is in fact the case, you may need to ask for your money back.

    > Have these folks provided you with a service agreement?

    > Have these folks provided you with a detailed list of work conducted?

    > Have these folks provided you with labels & MSDS of all pesticide products applied in your home?

    > How many people reside in your home, any pets, etc. ?

    > Can you tell me exactly what work has been conducted thus far at your home, how long this has been going on and other such details?

    If so, those would be details that would be beneficial to discuss.

    Additionally, it may be best to use PM (private message) such that I can provide you with additional suggestions.

    I'm sorry you're going through this.

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  19. NorthEast

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 12:29:12
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    I'm going to have to disagree with Mr. Bello that "Mattress & box spring encasements are a must !"

    Encasements can play a helpful role espcially with inspections but by no means are required for bed bug elimination. I would much rather kill all the bed bugs during the service(s) rather then trying to entomb the bugs. I also see so many encasements that have become ripped from normal use.

    I'm sure my opininon on encasements will be the minority and if you do choose to use encasements please consider what your purpose for using an encasment is and is it worth the money.

  20. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 13:01:23
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    (Actually northeast and I agree on certain points regarding encasements. But, it's my fault for not stating the various caveats in play regarding the use of encasements which should be further explained ! )

    Please note that the role of encasements in bed bug control includes the following:

    > To protect the mattress and box spring from becomeing overly stained by bed bug fecal matter.

    > To prevent bed bugs from being able to enter and harbor within the item encased.

    > To prevent any bed bugs that survive the application process from being able to subsequently feed on the person sleeping on the bed in question.

    > To make it easier to inspect the mattress and box spring for bed bugs during subsequent inspections.

    > To take away the many potential hiding places/harborages offered and present on today's pillow top type mattresses and the various locations on the surfaces of the mattress and box spring.

    Please note that none of the above factors byt itself will actually result in the elimination of bed bugs. These encasements are part of a comprehensive effort and not the only answer in and of themselves.

    Other factors to consider:

    > Rips in encasements:
    Encasments are composed of fabrics that may rip due to friction and other forces such as when they rub against a metal bed frame. Logically, we'd expect this to occur. As such, it is wise to protect the the encasement in advance to prevent this from happening. While some folks use duct tape and other such materials to prevent ripping, the MS folks provide felt like tabs to place in contact ares to prevent such ripping. If tears do occur they may be sealed using various types of tape.

    > Box springs:
    Box springs are particularly problematic in that the inner framework provides many inaccessible and difficult to access/reach areas where bed bugs may harbor, avoid detection and potentially escape treatment. Additionally, there are numerous areas where eggs may be deposited that may also give rise to additional bed bugs subsequent to the treatment work. As such, the installation of an encasement directly mitigates these concerns in a relatrively quick and cost effective fashion. Please note that while it's great that an experienced professional may feel 100% confident in his ability to totally eliminate every bed bug from a box spring, at the end of the day the downside risk of possibly missing just one egg overrides such assertions and it is unwise to assume such a risk at the cost of the potential bed bug victim who is dependent upon his chosen professional to protect him from same.

    > Can we succeed against bed bugs without encasements?
    Yes, it's possible but we need to objectively weigh the risks in attaining complete success rather than base our decisions on the what may be possible which places the consumer unnecessarily at the sole risk of being bitten. We need to ask; why incur an avoidable risk?

    > Are encasements costly?
    This is subjective. Yes, there are some units that are much more expensive than others. However, we also need to consider the costs of being bitten, continued infestation and additional cost of follow up remediation work.

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  21. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 13:20:01
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    I'm getting encasements today.
    The PCO said the mattress was the problem now.
    If the BB are indeed hiding in the mattress it just makes sense to encase them.

  22. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 13:58:08
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    Dear dmj,

    Whatever you decide be sue that the encasements you purchase clearly state: Tested Bed Bug Proof, Bed Bug Bite Proof, Bed Bug Entry/Escape Proof, etc.

    DO NOT purchase "bed bug resistant" or "may help to prevent" type encasements because these are likely not the tested type.

    I have questions for you:

    > How do we know they are in the mattress?

    > How do you think you got bed bugs in this home in the first place? ( I think I read the appeared there after you moved in, is this so?)

    > Did you have bed bugs in your former home too?

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  23. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 14:13:25
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    Thanks for the tip on the covers.

    I don't know that they are in the mattress.
    But I'm eliminating possibilities.

    We didn't have bed bugs at our previous residence.
    They simply appeared at the house we moved into.

    I don't travel so they had to be in the new house already.

  24. P Bello

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    Mon Dec 31 2012 14:15:39
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    OK.

    Check your PM.

    pb

  25. bed-bugscouk

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    Mon Dec 31 2012 14:25:05
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    Hi NorthEast,

    PCO who do not insist on encasements is the minority although Bedbug only companies and the trend is the other way around, of the 5 I am aware of in the world 3 don't carry encostments.

    Interestingly in 2012 one of the academic groups broke rank and voiced concern over changes in bedbug behaviour with encased beds and I have since heard others speak of the thygmotaxic response which is altered through encasement.

    I personally feel the principle had application but the current method does not meet the cost versus benefit ratio I am looking for.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  26. buggyinsyracuse

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 31 2012 18:47:05
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    Paul - I am interestd in your take on this. My concern with encasements from the getgo was the issue of them getting ripped. Considering the lifespan of a bedbug could go as long as 18 months, and considering the fact that encasements can and do get ripped on occasion, doesn't that increase the likelihood of reinfestation?

    So given this, say a PCO offers a 6 month gaurantee & inisist on encasement, and at 7 months the encasement gets ripped, who is responsible for the cost of the treatment.

    Please know that I do not mean this with any disrespect to you whatsoever, I have utmost respect towards you, it's just been a burning question in my mind.

  27. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 22:46:10
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    Landlord purchased encasements 2 days ago.
    We put them on.
    The PCO sprayed 2 days ago.

    My method of action was to disassemble the beds, steam clean them, and use climb ups.
    While disassembling the bed today I found 10 BB alive and healthy.
    I not sure about my method now.

    This means the PCO sprayed 4 times and I still have happy bed bugs

  28. P Bello

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    Thu Jan 3 2013 0:11:28
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    Aahh weedhoppers, some interesting points to consider !

    Dear syracuse,

    Firstly, thanks for the "utmost respect"; YOU're the one.

    I was wondering who it was that actually respected my writings besides my mom ! : )

    An important factor is to prevent the encasements from ripping/tearing and being able to suitably seal them if they do.

    Who said these encasements were made of braided stainless steel in the first place anyway? The truth is that the superior units are made of more durable fabric while the cheaper models are made, uh, er, like cheaper models.

    And, when fabric is placed against a metal bed frame + friction + compression + kids jumping on the bed + newlyweds doin what they do + other factors = rip potential.

    Minus certain levels of care rips & tears are the expected result and are not a suprise. As such, we need to take steps to address and prevent this factor.

    Note that the encasements I recommend come with pre-fashioned felt like pads that are strategically placed at points of contact/friction to prevent rips.

    PLUS, we're supposed to have removed/killed/eliminated the bed bugs prior to the encasement installation. At least that's included in my recomended methodologies.

    OK, 'nuff said on that me thinx.

    The burning question, the warranty question is interesting for here we have a mixture of a tangible product warranty combined with a service warranty. Hmmmm . . . some considerations:

    > A rip or tear in an ecasnement does not necessarily result in a re-infestation.

    > If the tear occurs beyond the warranty period then, simply stated, it's beyond the warranty period.

    > Of concern to me is: when does the warranty period actually/ritefully begin? Does it begin the day the service starts or does it begin the day there's no more bed bugs? When do YOU think it should begin?

    So, here's my take on this:

    As professionals and consumes we know these items are subject to wear & tear and may rip. We need to provide for that and suitably address it. As we collectively know this in advance, it's non-factor in regards to the warranty. (As an example: can you return your tire to the tire store and trade it in for a new one because you ran over a nail? No, not really. However, and BTW, there is additional tire insurance coverage that some tire companies are now selling. I only know this because my tires seem to be nail magnets and I bought this coverage from my tire dealer.)

    Warranties should be reasonable. They should make entomological sense and the service provided which is covered by the warranty should have a reasonable chance of actually being successful.

    Please advise if I didn't fully answer your question(s), thanks !

    Dear dmj,

    OK, we have some other issues to address here:

    > Remember that it's possible for bed bugs to move into harborage areas subsequent to your treatment. This may be why you found live bed bugs subsequent to your treatment or inspection. And, its why we do follow up services.

    What's that you're asking; what about the insecticides that were placed in some of these areas, shouldn't they have killed these bed bugs? Hmmm . . . Well, given that they are efficacious products, yes. However, mortality sets in over time after sufficient exposure. These residuals don't work "instantly" and bed bugs that contact residual insecticide treated surfaces just don't explode, burst into flames or keel dead in like seconds.

    What is you missed these areas where you later found bed bugs?

    What of the places that the bed bugs were hiding prior to you finding them in your bed frame? Could there be "other areas" that need to be inspected and treated? Of course there are !

    Remember, because bed bugs can hide anywhere, we need to inspect and treat everywhere.

    Success is about being thorough as well as considering the many factors of bed bug biology & behavior.

    While I often gloss over this point, our friend DC will quickly remind us that we also need to address the bed bug faucet factor; that is, where and how did we get the bed bugs in the first place ! If we don't recognize and deal with this factor sufficiently we are likely doomed to subsequent re-infestation/re-introduction.

    dmj, In short I suspect that "your basic method" is OK but that you may not have been thorough enough to have gotten to ALL the areas/bed bugs and/or eggs too.

    As such, you need to go back and get 'em again.

    Just be more thorough when you wreak your bloody vengence upon your bed bugs next time !

    Again, please advise if I missed answering any of your questions or concerns !

    Hope this helps and thanks for the honor of being able to assist you ! paul b.

  29. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jan 3 2013 0:40:06
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    dmjohnson,

    If you live somewhere where the law says landlord must eliminate bed bugs, then there may be a local agency which will enforce this. It may help.

    Also, encasements are not recommended by all PCOs, and tearing is a legitimate concern.

    PMPs who do recommend encasements regularly point to both Protect-a-bed and Mattress Safe encasements as well-designed.

    (This site only carries ads for Protect-a-bed because though we would like to, we haven't been able to make any arrangements with Mattress Safe yet. However, the encasements FAQ notes that both have passed stringent tests. Disclosure: purchasing through the affiliate ads for encasements helps support the running of this site at no additional cost to you. Please read our disclosure policy for more.)

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  30. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jan 3 2013 0:46:27
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    thygmotaxic behavior? David Cain mentioned this and I googled it but don't understand how the encasements would do this.

    It may be mentioned in Paul's master thesis, which I fully intend to read. But what's the main issue with this and encasements? Spread the ones that aren't in the encasement? Grasshopper TAOT does not understand.

    Sincerely, with respect and an early morning meeting,

    TAOT

    They
    Are
    Out
    There
    = TAOT
  31. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jan 3 2013 2:21:24
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    Dear taot,

    I think you may mean "thigmotropic".

    This term was associated with cockroaches and may be applicable to bed bugs as well.

    What it means is that the cockroach prefers to hide in harborages where its body can be contacted by the surfaces within the harborage. Simply stated, the roach is "squeezed into" it's crack or crevice hiding spot such that both its belly and back contact the top & bottom of the hiding place.

    This would be like you hiding under your bed. Your belly would be against the floor and your back would be against the bottom of the bed. Now all we need know is who's bed it is and why you're hiding under there anyway ?

    Now it is possible that you were correct in stating thygmo-taxic or possibly thygmo-toxic however, I'll have to check on this for you.

    And, looking at the clock, Holy Crap, it's 2:21 AM, gotta get some sleep ! ! !

    Have a great tomorrow, well, actually today ! paul b.

    Make sense? OK, good.

  32. buggyinsyracuse

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jan 3 2013 18:55:15
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    Thanks, Paul. I really appreciate it!

  33. dmjohnson3

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Jan 4 2013 0:46:29
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    So what am I to do?
    I can guarantee the next step the exterminator will take is
    To insist I throw out all of my furniture.
    Do I comply? Will that solve the issue?

    Why after 4 treatments do I still have bugs?

  34. nikki

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Jan 5 2013 23:18:58
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    Uptown, thanks for the very thorough discussion of the bunk beds. I'm so hesitant to bring anything new into my house these days, but that was very helpful!

    DM - good luck. I can't imagine how tough this is!

    -Nikki


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