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Oxygen Depletion Treatment Methodology

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  1. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 11 2015 11:57:56
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    Dear Folks,

    I just got off the phone with a retired couple who reported that they had their home treated by a process called "oxygenics" for about $1,500. The trouble is that they still have bed bugs and they are now staying elsewhere to avoid continued bites from occurring.

    While the theory of oxygen deprivation may sound viable, the trouble lies in the execution, implementation and/or utilization of this methodology. Here's why:

    > Insects such as bed bugs are tiny animals and require small amounts of oxygen to survive.
    > Bed bug eggs respiration needs are miniscule.
    > The "application" of this methodology relies upon the overall integrity of the structure and "building envelope" to be and remain "air tight" in order to keep all sources of fresh air completely out during the process.

    These folks had this done a few weeks ago and have still had bed bugs each day ever since.

    Please note that this methodology has been proposed and tested plus discussed on this BBF previously.

    If it was a viable, efficacious and proven methodology, there'd be many more pros using it today. They're not.

    Please do your homework and be careful before you make a purchase decision.

    Good luck and have a great day ! pjb

  2. BigDummy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 11 2015 12:18:16
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    I toyed around with an ozone generator for a bit, but even in a controlled area it was pointless.

  3. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 11 2015 13:04:11
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    Yeah, and I spelled depletion wrong in the headline so, there's that.

    Maybe nobugs can fix it for me . . .

    However, it's sad that these folks have spent so much money in this way on this situation.

    Yikes !

    pjb

  4. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 11 2015 14:07:44
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    P Bello - 1 hour ago  » 
    Yeah, and I spelled depletion wrong in the headline so, there's that.
    Maybe nobugs can fix it for me . . .

    It's the least I can do.

    I thought that looked kind of Greekish-- Delpletion-- like the Oracle of Delphi's Oxygen Depletion program.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  5. GhangisKong

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 11 2015 18:52:24
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    Thanks so much, P Bello. Do you know if there's a methodology to suffocate bed bugs by blocking off their breathing apparatus?

    Perhaps a kind of oil for them to fall into that they'd not be able to get back out of quick enough to breath again which can be put at the bed legs, much like the ClimbUp or Blackout interceptors?

    I do know that various types of bugs can be suffocated by prolonged submersion in oil...

  6. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 11 2015 19:46:41
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    Dear ghangis,

    Insects have structures called spiracles through which they take in air. These spiracles are tiny ports or holes that the insect may close. This is why you can submerge an insect in water and it doesn't drown. The spiracles are attached to tracheoles which are long vein/tube like structures which bring the air into the insect's body.

    Man has been using oil type sprays to kill insects for a long time. These oil sprays are used to suffocate insects as you suggest. Years back when I owned and operated my pest company we applied "dormant oil" type spray applications to control certain insect pests on ornamental shrubs and trees. This practice is still being done today.

    There are a number of liquids that may be used to trap bed bugs as you suggest. In the "old days" folks would place bowls or tin cans under their bed legs to prevent bed bugs from climbing up. They'd place liquids in these containers such as cooking oil, oil, soapy water and other such materials.

    Hope this helps ! pjb

  7. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 11 2015 19:48:05
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    GhangisKong - 54 minutes ago  » 
    Thanks so much, P Bello. Do you know if there's a methodology to suffocate bed bugs by blocking off their breathing apparatus?

    I think Paul's point was that oxygen depletion is not the way to go because:

    "> Insects such as bed bugs are tiny animals and require small amounts of oxygen to survive.
    > Bed bug eggs respiration needs are miniscule."

    There are plenty of other ways to kill bed bugs which work.

  8. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 20 2015 9:40:45
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    Several years back I worked with some folks on a oxygen depletion project. It entailed oxygen scrubbers in a containment bubble. The problem is the amount of time it takes to remove oxygen to a lethal level. So if you want to have a bubble in your living room for 1-2 weeks it may be a plan. It is used a bit more successfully in large scale agriculture where you have the heat of stored grain helping you out. In short in terms of bed bugs it was a theoretical approach with no practical real world application. In terms of attempting this in a whole structure seems a bit how can I put this PC, quite questionable!

  9. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 20 2015 10:02:58
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    Winston O. Buggy - 21 minutes ago  » 
    In terms of attempting this in a whole structure seems a bit how can I put this PC, quite questionable!

    Quite tactful, Winston!

    Very helpful info., also.

  10. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 20 2015 14:10:01
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    I guess I'm adapting.

  11. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 20 2015 14:59:22
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    Nobugsonme -  » 
    Quite tactful, Winston!
    Very helpful info., also.

    Yes, VERY suspicious! . . . Who are you . . . and what have you done with the real Sir Winston?!?!

  12. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 20 2015 16:32:17
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    Dear ABS, for goodness sake, I've not the faintest clue as to what you may be referring to, but thank you for inquiring. Please have a wonderful weekend. Thank you and good luck to all those afflicted with this horrid plague. Perhaps it is the effect of the topic.

  13. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 20 2015 17:02:28
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    Winston O. Buggy -  » 
    Dear ABS, for goodness sake, I've not the faintest clue as to what you may be referring to, but thank you for inquiring. Please have a wonderful weekend.

    LM*O Sir Winston . . .

    However, apparently, I must have you confused with another "O. Buggy" . . . one that adores sarcastic/witty repartee as much as I? . . . Well, either that or you are the "new" kinder, gentler Sir Winston!

    Regardless, I wish you a wonderful weekend as well!


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