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Need help ID:ing a bug [a: beetle]

(6 posts)
  1. abitscared

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Apr 1 2015 15:13:32
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    aHi!

    As I had a some rashes and a couple of bloodstains on bed clothes before I called a pest control agency 5 months ago or so. They did a scan of my apartment and looked for bugs but couldn't find any evidence. They told me to look out for rashes that came in a row or close to each other, for black spots under/by my bed and for bug shells. So far i've found nothing like that so I just assumed I had a reaction or my bed was unclean with food/dust/whatever.

    I found a small black bug crawling near my bed now and I was wondering what it could be. A nymph or something completely unrelated.

    I was therefore hoping if someone could ID this. It's very small and I had to smash it to photo it so I understand if it's impossible.



  2. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Apr 1 2015 15:17:03
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    It's a beetle. Appears to have been "mechanically controlled" (i.e. crushed to death) and may be a grain type pest beetle.

    In any case, it's definitely NOT a bed bug so, you can relax for now.

    pjb

  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Apr 1 2015 15:17:21
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    Hi,

    100% not bedbug. It's a beetle as you can see from the split wing casings and the antennae. I don't have access to my charts at home to species ID but it nothing to be overly concerned with unless you see 20+ and then finding their food source and a vacuum cleaner will often resolve things.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  4. abitscared

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Apr 1 2015 15:19:15
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    Wow. Thanks a bunch. I'm very grateful for the quick replies.

  5. loubugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Apr 2 2015 10:49:32
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    Looks like a species of Oryzaephilus. One commonly encountered species is called the merchant grain beetle and the other, the saw-toothed grain beetle. The "casings" are actually right and left wing covers (elytra). The split is the space between the right and left sides. In life, the space is seen as a line because the right and left are touching one another. These are derived from the front wings; the hind wings are membranous and can be seen in the space between the right and left covers. Hind wings are membranous and are folded to fit underneath the covers. These are moved by muscles connected from the within the thorax during flight.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  6. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Apr 2 2015 11:42:57
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    loubugs - 52 minutes ago  » 
    Looks like a species of Oryzaephilus. One commonly encountered species is called the merchant grain beetle and the other, the saw-toothed grain beetle. The "casings" are actually right and left wing covers (elytra). The split is the space between the right and left sides. In life, the space is seen as a line because the right and left are touching one another. These are derived from the front wings; the hind wings are membranous and can be seen in the space between the right and left covers. Hind wings are membranous and are folded to fit underneath the covers. These are moved by muscles connected from the within the thorax during flight.

    Just gotta love that Lou Sorkin!!


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