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Mattress encasement opinions needed- what would YOU do?

(12 posts)
  1. OutOutDarnBugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Mar 5 2014 7:42:51
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    So last night as I was making my bed and doing my monthly inspection, I lifted up my mattress and the encasement snagged on a part of my bedframe. Some fraying occurred. There's not a gaping hole, really, it's more that the outer woven "shell" that seems to be compromised (it's a Protect-a-bed) and it's possible that the hole didn't go through the inner plasticy lining. But needless to say, it's enough to make me anxious and feel like I need to fix the problem.

    So, some back story before I get opinions: this encasement has been on my mattress for the past 2 1/2 years. When I moved into my new apartment, I put this one on top of the old one on my mattress. Even though the old encasement was fine, I was worried something got on it in the move, even though it had been wrapped in plastic wrap and only transported in my boyfriend's van. So there are currently 2 encasement on my bed- a tighter fitting one that has been on it for the past 4 1/2 years (right after my Vikane treatment) and the outer, looser one (they only had the next size up in stock) that has the potential hole.

    So that leads me to my question. When I get this new encasement, should I try to fit it over the top, looser one? Or should I take the ripped one off, leave on the bottom, tighter one (I definitely don't feel comfortable taking THAT one off), and put the new one on- thereby still having 2 encasements on top, rather than 3? After a very recent bout of paranoia, I had a k9 inspection, which didn't alert to anything in my apartment, let alone my room, and I haven't seen any evidence on my various monitors. I guess I'm just feeling squeamish about removing the outer encasement.

    Good people of BBForum, what would you do if you were in my position? You've all been so helpful and supportive in the past! Thanks for all your advice!

  2. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Mar 5 2014 10:35:45
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    Hi,

    I know how you feel about taking off the encasement. I had the same problem, but mine had only been on there for months, not years. If I were in your shoes, I would also consider taking it off.

    If you feel nervous about taking it off, just duct tape the torn area until you feel safer about it.

    (I'm not an expert, just a lifelong student)

  3. BigDummy

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Mar 5 2014 11:48:29
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    No amount of encasements can prevent bedbugs, take them both off. If you feel like you want one buy one without a hole. I'm thinking that if you repair the torn one you'll obsess over it.

  4. OutOutDarnBugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Mar 5 2014 12:18:34
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    BigDummy, I'm aware that no amount of encasements can prevent bugs. I have many other monitoring tools in place, I just appreciate the visual the encasement gives. I have found, as a common layperson, it's easier for me to inspect my surroundings when I'm working with an encasement. I'm thinking that I just need a new one, as you're right that I'd just obsess over the repaired one.

    Daylight, thank you so much for your words. I appreciate expert opinion, as well as "lifelong students"!

    Any others?

  5. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Mar 5 2014 14:41:36
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    You're very welcome. Let me know how you decide.

    I didn't take my old one off--just taped it, but yes, it is a bit of a worry. I had a PCO inspect the two pieces (mattress and foundation--which is the one with the torn corners) very carefully and he helped me tape it. I too use Protect a bed but it's hard to get the perfect fit with the Tempurpedic mattress and foundation. I have a new one in the closet ready to put on or replace--can't get ahold of the idea of removing the old one--actually there's three covers on my foundation because it's basically wood and any friction makes it tear. Makes me want to get rid of the foundation altogether and just use the mattress, like with a platform bed. Still thinking about that because I'm not sure bed isolation is good in the long run--just in case there's still something out there.

    I

  6. Butterfly1972

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Mar 5 2014 14:59:02
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    Hi OutODB,

    I use the Protect-A-Bed encasements as well. Mine have been on since July 2011, very sturdy. And great peace of mind for me with having them on our beds. It's a personal decision for each person.

    I honestly don't know if it would make any difference if you left the tighter fitting cover on under the new encasement (but, I would take the looser one off if you buy a new one). I wouldn't think that it would matter as long as the underneath one was REALLY tight fitting, but your best answer on that would be from one of the pros who know all about encasements. I have seen the advice given on here to just duct tape the hole, so I don't think that would be an issue either if you want to save the $$ on a new one.

    I would do whatever makes you feel the most comfortable.....and of course, follow the advice given to you by the pros.

    BTW, I'm not an expert/pro either.....another lifelong student ~ LOVE that one, Daylight!!! Perfect!!

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Mar 5 2014 17:07:49
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    Hi,

    If its a small hole and you are free from bedbugs patch it up and remember to cover the thing that caused the snag.

    Not a huge fan of encasement for various reasons but if you are looking for contrast and ease of inspection there are a lot of snug fitting woven "dust mite" covers that give a much better "fit" than other ones. They also have the huge advantage of generally being a more reasonable cost as well.

    I did a job recently where a previous company had used encasement and although it did help contrast and thus to physically remove 3 bedbugs other steps we took removed a lot more but the age of the building was part of the challenge that we faced. To put it mildly its a bit tough to move the bed when it takes 8 people to do so because its a 250 year old oak posted and paneled bed that is braced to the wall.

    If its the ease that puts you at ease then you should go with what you feel will make you less anxious because that may be the root of the issue. To that end I have to say I am yet to meet the person who has survived a bedbug issue who has encountered a second as bad as the first. Having been through it once people tend to be better prepared should a second encounter occur.

    The only exception to that I can recall was a city investment banker type I met in about 2007 who upon bringing bedbugs back from the second holiday was asked why he did not check the hotel room as advised? He replied "its OK I know to call you guys and you just fix it" and explained something about how the perk of the salary was he could afford anything. Oddly enough our promise of a "three strikes and your out" policy meant that he could only call upon our services on one more occasion should he forget to check the bed and bring them home. After that he would receive the polite and infamous "we would like to remind you that you have a choice who undertakes your bedbug eradication, except for on this occasion where that list will not include us". This is out "polite English" way of saying we are terribly sorry but your money and no amount of money are sufficient to undertake this job.

    Do what makes you feel better and you cant go too far wrong because bedbug prevention is about what you do outside your home not to you home.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  8. ITortureBugs4Revenge

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Mar 6 2014 3:05:13
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    To encase or not to encase pretty much depends on what makes you feel better. Based on my experience with mattress encasements (I stress the words "my experience", as i am not an expert) they are great for keeping the mattress free from soiling by sweat, pet accidents, e.t.c. as well as keeping the bugs themselves from soiling the mattress with their feces, and mattress inspections are no doubt much easier to perform with an encasement in place than without, but encasements don't do anything to reduce the number of bugs accessing you in your sleep, as the bugs simply counter the difficulty of harboring in a protected mattress by moving more into the bed frame. In my experience using exclusion methods, like placing the legs of the bed in stainless steel bowls (Way too smooth a surface for bugs to climb) while keeping the bed away from the wall and the blankets tucked tightly under the mattress so the blankets can't touch the floor are more effective at keeping the bed and mattress free of bugs.

    .....I am NOT an expert.....

    Any advice i give here is based solely on my own personal experiences in dealing with bedbugs & other household vermin.
  9. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Mar 6 2014 8:05:34
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    Here is an informative FAQ on protecting the bed. Wish I had read this a while ago.

    http://bedbugger.com/2006/11/02/faq-how-do-i-protect-my-bed-from-bed-bugs-part-i/

    I really appreciate how the FAQ explains that you can protect your bed but you don't have to isolate it.

  10. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 7 2014 1:18:26
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    We also have an encasements FAQ which goes into pros and cons, and some of the things you should consider.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  11. OutOutDarnBugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Mar 8 2014 21:33:33
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    Thanks for all your ideas, everyone! I think I've decided to take off the top, ripped encasement, leave the bottom one on, and then put the new one on top. Since it's been 2 1/2 years since the top one was installed, and also due to the recent negative k9 inspection, I'm trying to remind myself that there probably isn't anything living in between those two encasements that could escape while I'm re-encasing.

    My roommate is going to help me tomorrow, and I think I'll celebrate my "calmness" with a long bath and a movie!

  12. OutOutDarnBugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Mar 9 2014 19:49:51
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    As a follow-up...I removed the top encasement, and GUESS WHAT? The new encasement I put on had a HOLE IN IT! Straight from the package!

    Sigh. I went back to the store, got a new encasement, religiously checked it for holes or tears (both on my own, and with help from the roomie, and tried again.

    2nd time's the charm?

    Thanks, again, Forum, for your help!


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