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List of DO NOT HEAT items?

(14 posts)
  1. mindkites

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jun 22 2011 13:40:12
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    I'm looking for a comprehensive list of items that should be removed during a heat treatment. Been searching the site but maybe I'm missing something. Anyone know where I can find a good list?

    Thanks!
    Mike

  2. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jun 22 2011 13:57:33
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    You should talk to the PCO who is planning to do the treatment as methods vary slightly from provider to provider.

    A good thermal provider should send a tech who specializes in thermal to do a walk through of the structure prior to the treatment. Mine came by at least a week before and actually pointed out to me the specific items that needed to be removed or changed.

    What MY thermal provider/MY experience told ME were the following items:

    *CDs, DVDs, VHS tapes
    *photographs
    *meltable make up (think of it this way: anything you leave in the trunk or back seat of a car--if it melts, you don't want it in the home. lipstick, chapstick, eyeliner)
    *chocolate
    *alcohol that is drinkable (liquor, wine, etc.) I was told that these could be stored in the fridge
    *anything that is mostly or substantially isopropyl alcohol: hand sanitizer, bottles of rubbing alcohol. I missed a few small bottles and the plastic plumped up like Ballpark Franks in a commercial for 'em.
    *candles: dude. trust me. you don't want to leave those around; they are a PITA to clean up if you forget them.
    *any electronics that cannot be turned complete off. Some electronics continue to pull power when shut off but plugged in. There's a good chance that electronics not entirely removed from power sources will fail if not immediately after treatment than in a much faster way than had they not been heated up. Consider items like iPods and the new unibody MacBook Pro (which has a non-removable battery) in this category.
    *any electronic that functions on a touch screen. I had my cell phone with me, but the microwave I had had touchpad imputs. It totally stoppped working (I didn't unplug mine, so that's likely my fault, but it is worth considering.)
    *any electronic device that may use a thermal shut off switch: several of my surge protectors stopped working. i'd also forgotten to plug those (because in my mine if there wasn't anything plugged into them, they were off right? Wrong.) UNPLUG EVERY ELECTRONIC DEVICE.

    Again, that's what I can report from my experience, but the best advice always comes from your provider because your provider knows exactly what the procedure used in your place will be.

  3. mindkites

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jun 22 2011 14:21:57
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    Awesome. Thanks. My provider gave me a list but it seems abbreviated and left a lot of question, for me anyway. Like I wondered about tapes and bar soap? What about my extra boxes of contacts? Stuff like that. I just wondered if anyone had more detailed lists. Yours was great thank you again!

  4. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jun 22 2011 14:29:10
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    I'm trying to remember if I had boxes of contacts in the home at the time. I must've. I think I've been wearing disposables that long. Double check with your provider.

    Bar soap? Not a problem at all. I had a couple of very nice bars from a place in Madison Wisconsin from a trip I'd just been on (The Soap Opera is the name of the store);They came through just fine.

    I did have a few 32 ounce size pump top bottles of other hair products (conditioner mostly) "leak." It was like the heat drove the conditioner up through the pump top part, and the conditioner leaked out of the pump, defying gravity. Some of the veneer on IKEA furniture peeled off. My grandparents' dressers in the bedroom came through fine.

    Cassette tapes, being made from the same basic stuff as VHS tapes, will likely need to be removed.

    And I would definitely remove duct tape and such from the home. I left a roll in the apartment, and it wasn't pretty.

  5. BitingMad

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Feb 22 2012 22:35:33
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    Is the item list different for items that are removed to a secondary location for heat treatment, vs remaining in a house as it's treated?

    Are all clothes safe for such heating, even fragile fabrics? What about coats, shoes, and purses? Books and magazines? Receipts and household papers? Jewelry? Power cords?

  6. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Feb 23 2012 1:30:32
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    Regular clothes are safe for treatment. Most "dry clean only" fabrics can, actually, be heated in the dryer if they go into the dryer dry instead of wet. Temps in the home are lower than temps in many dryers. I had no problems with any clothes. If you have very old antique things (like a family heirloom christening gown, for example) or very expensive unusual fabrics, I might remove those.

    Coats, shoes, and purses all came through fine for me. YMMV.

    Books came through fine--esp. more expensive ones. (I suspect heat treatment may have sped up the aging of cheap paperbacks, but they're cheap paperbacks, so, I didn't care. My hardbacks and quality paper backs all came through fine.

    OMG, receipts. I totally forgot to mention this. My 2008 taxes were a nightmare because of this.

    If your receipts are printed on real paper, like when a hotel hands you your closing bill fresh from the laser printer, they're fine.

    However, many receipts are printed on thermal paper, and those should ALL not be in the house if you're going to need to be able to read them later.

    Expensive jewelry was all fine. Some of my cheap costume jewelry was not (one pair of faux aquamarine earrings from Target got spiderweb cracks in the "crystal" bit.)

    Any power device--including surge protectors and power cords--absolutely must be unplugged. If they're unplugged, they should be fine. Plugged in, I wouldn't risk it.

    But again, the above is based on my personal experience. When in doubt, the best advice is always to talk to your thermal provider. That PCO knows what temps will be reached in your case. Always ask the pros first; use advice from here only to supplement what your PCO says if your PCO is not adequately communicative.

  7. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Feb 23 2012 7:04:37
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    What a great idea to compose a list of items of concern for heat treatments and thanks to buddyinsocal for giving us all a great head start !

    In certain aspects the bed bug world is akin to the "wild, wild west". Things are getting better for sure but I'm in favor of any effort to speed the overall improvement process.

    In my view such a list should be categorized, alpha sorted and presented in a clear and organized fashion.

    This project is now on my "To Do" list.

    Any who wish to participate/help with the composition thereof please send me a PM.

    Oh yes, over there, I think we do have a volunteer.

    Are you IN buggyinsocal ? (Please say yes and send me a PM.)

    Thanks to all ! paul b.

  8. BugsSkeeveMe

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Mar 9 2012 22:34:28
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    This is a random add to the list but any diabetic testing supplies, especially test strips!

  9. futureBBmom

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Mar 31 2012 23:23:44
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    I'll add my experience to this list.

    During treatment unplug absolutely everything except the fridge. Do not plug anything back in until it's cooled down.
    I was told my VHS tapes could not be heat treated, so they weren't.
    Don't heat treat anything with dry sugar in it! My sugar, jello, and the koolaide didn't survive.
    Don't heat treat plants.
    Don't heat treat anything in gel cap form. (actually all pills/meds of any kind should go in the fridge)
    All wax or meltables go in the fridge.
    Vinyl mini blinds MUST be rolled up before heat treatment or they droop. (Forgot to roll one of mine up, yup it's VERY droopy.)
    Two remote controls quit working within the first couple weeks.
    A small antique end table bubbled on top. It was near the couch that they concentrated on during heating.
    Several of the batteries did not survive.
    Keep all lotion/cream bottles locked shut or they will leak out.
    All creams, lotions, oils will near boiling during treatment so if it's expensive or a prescription then don't heat treat it. The heat will probably breakdown the ingredients.
    A bottle of Mr Clean with Febreze boiled out. I don't think any of my liquid cleaners were as effective after that.
    Two tubes of Psoriasis cream turned to liquid and didn't ever recover.
    Makeup (foundation) didn't do well, it broke down too.

    Specific things that did survive that I was worried about:
    All photos, CDs and DVDs and flash drives did fine. They had me put them in the tub.
    My MP3 players and PCs did fine and still are fine.
    All of my tape is usable but it came close to not being that way. The sticky on a few of them isn't as good now and a few came close to sticking together.
    Several rolls of contact paper did ok.

    After effects months later:
    I have an older house, the heat helped everything AGE quite a bit more.
    The next day after treatment I noticed the single handle faucet in the kitchen was stiff. It had to be replaced a month later.
    Molding is separating from the ceiling in 2 rooms.
    One of my plaster ceilings is cracking in several places.
    We started blowing fuses that we've never blown before so I assume some wiring has been effected.
    Caulking is all cracked.
    Some older paint has cracked and is peeling.
    Some of the wallpaper in a few rooms I papered just before heat treatment popped loose on the edges (seams). But just re-glued the edges and it's fine.
    We have carpeting all through but you can tell when walking that several floor boards are now showing effects of it.

  10. emeraldeyez

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jun 29 2012 15:00:11
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    Hey...I'm new to this forum and believe me...I didn't want to be a member of this forum! I hate BUGS!! To me...a good bug is only a DEAD bug!! This is driving me crazy! But anyway...
    I have no clue if the apartment complex has bed bugs or if one of my friends (who have now disappeared out of my life once they got word I'm having this problem) gave them to me or what...
    But nonetheless...I found them in my back bedroom and I immediately had gotten spray and started killing 'em (rubbing alcohol works great on the LIVE bugs) But I was informed by my apt. manager that they need to heat treat.
    OK...I have precious things in here that won't take a heat treatment.
    I have this comprehensive protocol list of things I need to do.
    I have my computer, flash drives, an external hard drive and modem...I know these things don't last in extreme cold...I know they won't last in extreme heat. I have a small dog and 3 cats and fish. Will the aquarium last in extreme heat?
    And what about resin on my fairy figurines? I have fairy figurines worth close to several hundred dollars. It's no kiddie collection.
    And precious oil/tole paintings that my mom has painted...and one in an antique frame. Can the oils bubble?
    I feel like I'm removing half my house!
    The apartment manager said they can let me "move in" for a day to a vacant apartment and then treat that when they're done with mine. But they aren't giving me the key to this until Monday at 7 a.m. and it's just me working here since my friends up and vanished and the bug guys are coming at 8 a.m. on Monday. That gives me an hr. I suppose I will have to just wake up early and bag/box as much stuff up as possible and just put it outside and hope for the best. Thing is...I live in AZ and right now we're having a massive heat wave outside with humidity due to monsoon season rolling in So it will be just as hot outside as it will be in my apartment and ANYTHING can melt/explode if I leave it outside or inside.
    So...I'm beside myself here.
    And then I have this cat that is addicted to clawing the hell out of ANY plastic bag.
    Yep...she'll have to suffer the consequences of being outside until all this blow over.
    But anyway...Here's a list that I compiled of things that I was informed of will need to be removed:
    I was given this list of protocol items to be removed by my leasing office and the PCO.
    List of things to remove:
    Any and all electronics...computers, tvs, vcr/dvd combo players, laptops, printers, computer storage devices (flash drives),
    radios, telephones, cell phones, camcorders, digital microwave ovens etc.
    Vinyl records, CDs/DVDs/VCRs
    Candles
    photographs
    plastic beads & plastic craft items, plastic storage bins, hair clips, barettes, anything plastic, things with plastic buckles.
    fans with plastic stands.
    IMPORTANT: Remove any and all medications, diabetic testing supplies, high blood pressure monitors and
    Oxygen tanks and masks!!!
    Remove any and all spray bottles...These contents are under pressure and can and will explode!
    Like furniture polish, Lysol spray, Easy Off Oven Cleaner, hair spray, etc. And lighters/lighter fluid
    Things inside plastic spray bottles...Lotions, etc.
    rubbing alcohol bottles, peroxide...bandaids, etc.
    Remove makeup, shampoo...anything in plastic bottles.
    All living critters and their cages...Remove their bedding and put it in the dryer on highest heat for at least 20 minutes.
    Remove dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, fish, rabbits & rodents. Unplug and remove the aquariums.
    Remove your trash bags and storage bags, plastic wrap and plastic containers not being used.
    Possibly your plastic cooking utensils if you think it will melt in a dishwasher then it will melt during heat treatment.
    live and artificial flower arrangements
    bag up ALL CLOTHING, pillows, blankets, linens, towels, potholders, pet stuff, stuffed animals, etc.
    and put outside in direct sunlight until you can either wash/dry these things on highest water temperature and dryer setting.
    Or put in dryer on highest setting for at least 20 minute cycles.
    This includes coats and things.
    Allow luggage to be heat treated...Remove laptops from laptop cases. (don't forget to remove power cords!)
    Shoes with plastic will need to be removed.
    OMg...This is like half the friggin' house.
    I would imagine I would have to remove my fairy figurines with the translucent wings, too. I would imagine resin could melt in extreme heat.
    Put peanut butter, fruit, vegetables that will melt inside fridge...ketchup in plastic bottles, or salad dressings or cereal in plastic
    bags...bread...If it's in a plastic bag it will melt.
    Not sure about plastic hangers, but I would remove these to be safe.

    Any help would be much appreciated.
    Thanks!

  11. Rabies

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Dec 3 2013 18:41:49
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    Just spoke to a trusted rep at an art supply store: add paints (acrylic, oils, and watercolours), pens, acrylic mediums, oil pastels (powder pigment should be fine), and inks to the list. Also, heat may cause acrylic paintings to bubble and blister: she suggested removing the artwork from the frame and leaving the frame for the heat treatment. Obviously, encaustic paintings should also not be exposed to heat! Sigh.

  12. SteamingMad

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Dec 3 2013 19:13:32
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    My list was similar to above mentioned things, but -

    -Oil paintings were on the list. I paint, in oil, and I have a lot of paintings (both my own and those I've collected). I left them all in my apartment, and they were fine. I left the paints in my apartment, as well as most of my other supplies save solvents (i.e. I left watercolors, oils, acrylics, pencils). Oh - pastel pencils went in the fridge.

    -I wasn't asked to unplug electronics. I'm sure it depends on the PCO's heating plan.

    -Unibody Macbook - they asked me to remove it, just to be safe. I did the same with my hard drives. I later treated them in a sealed bag with no pest strips (if you do this, make sure to follow the directions).

    -Crayons.

    -Live plants.

    -The cat.

    -I have an extensive camera/lens collection. I was asked to remove them all. I sealed and later treated with no pest strips (they lived in a bin under the bed; I wanted to be safe).

    -Loose photos and film.

    -I have a lot of books. I was asked to "loosen" up the shelves, as the books were packed in fairly tight.

    It's been five months down the road, and I've noticed no damage. My place was heated to 139 degrees and kept there for five hours.

  13. ITortureBugs4Revenge

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Dec 3 2013 19:54:09
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    I just played it safe and removed ALL my electronic devices, including battery backups and surge protectors. Things like books, clothes, e.t.c. all went through the treatment with no problems. Of course things like candles, chocolate candy, soaps, deodorants and the like can either be removed from the home or placed in the fridge.

    .....I am NOT an expert.....

    Any advice i give here is based solely on my own personal experiences in dealing with bedbugs & other household vermin.
  14. Emm

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 4 2013 20:39:36
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    I had spider mites for 2 years on a lemon tree. Nothing I tried would get rid of the mites.

    When they heat treated my apartment for bed bugs, I left the tree in there. I figured the mites would die before the tree did...so even if the tree died, I technically won the spider mite war.

    This is what my tree looked like post heat treatment. VERY dead....

    image

    Totally worth it. I have a new, mite free kumquat tree now


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