Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Improve the Site

Let's talk about eggs

(18 posts)
  1. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,132

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Feb 25 2014 3:21:40
    #



    Login to Send PM

    One of the areas where we hear repeat concerns over are eggs and the worry that they will spread or be transferred from location to location. However this is extremely unlikely to happen by transfer from one surface to another once laid due to the way that eggs are "cemented" to surfaces.

    So how can you help? The simplest thing is to post and share your questions / concerns or worries about eggs so we can creat an FAQ and get the right information out there.

    Don't worry about what you share. A few years ago I heard an academic say his team were worried about eggs in an experimental design where the concern was not a reliality.

    They tend to induce a concern level above their actual risks and at this stage I see a need for education to correct that.

    If there is enough information we can FAQ it or make sure it's integrated to the FAQs.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  2. ITortureBugs4Revenge

    member
    Joined: Nov '13
    Posts: 322

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Feb 25 2014 3:36:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Talking from my own experience i do know bedbug eggs adhere so stubbornly to where they were deposited that they are difficult to remove even when tape is used to pull them off, so i do believe that the fears many people have of picking up eggs from infested sites on their clothing are blown way out of proportion.

    .....I am NOT an expert.....

    Any advice i give here is based solely on my own personal experiences in dealing with bedbugs & other household vermin.
  3. made0fscars

    newbite
    Joined: Feb '14
    Posts: 17

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Feb 25 2014 3:40:22
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sorry for asking a question via message, I didn't realise I was not supposed to do that.

    So in your opinion my egg fears of them being transferred from a surface to my hands and then to my eyes is completely a no risk worry?

    Gemma.

  4. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,132

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Feb 25 2014 4:05:35
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi madeofscars,

    As I have already explained eggs once laid are cemented down and don't brush off.

    You then have to look at the odds of something transferring from surface to hands and then hands to eye. When apply logic you see this is a set odds in the lottery winning realms and this it's a worry you don't need to have.

    Given the level of dust and debris that kicks up in most homes when you inspect for bedbugs dust is the most logical candidate.

    David

  5. JustChecking

    oldtimer
    Joined: Nov '13
    Posts: 782

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Feb 25 2014 23:23:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    David, how come you don't include eggs in you replies to posts that had to do with what bed bug evidence to look for? Since eggs, fecal matters, shed skins, and live bed bugs can be found in clusters, I mentioned eggs as well in my replies.

    JustChecking, not a therapist / bug pro
    Please click my user name on the left for these threads:
    (OR go through my thread starter list OR use the search engine)
    --->stress busters --->energy boosters
    --->songs of hope and faith --->help U sleep tonight
  6. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,132

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Feb 26 2014 5:10:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    There is also another confirming sign I routinely leave out because sometimes with bedbugs you have to sacrifice technical accuracy for what is feasible to communicate.

    In the case of eggs they are hard for "most" people to detect and so often what is thought of as a possible eggs is just debris.

    It is also true that as bedbugs instinctively lay eggs in protected locations so they are harder to find than other signs.

    So yes they should be technically included but for simpler communication they are left out on the grounds that there are easier signs to both find and communicate.

    Hope that makes sense.

    David

  7. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Feb 26 2014 23:44:05
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I guess my concern with eggs would be 1) not seeing them and 2) those stories of one female laying 500 eggs in a month or something. Someone on here once described looking at the edge of their carpet at night in the dark with a flashlight and just seeing movement and eggs. It was creepy. But she couldn't get the eggs out. Everything else moved away.

    Lou has talked about not using light sheets but very, light pastels and even did that quilt.

    Do bedbugs lay eggs on sheets? Everyone talks about how washing sheets often helps. Is that because of eggs?

    They
    Are
    Out
    There
    = TAOT
  8. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,132

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Feb 27 2014 7:35:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    Yes the figure of 500 eggs per month is a great number if you want scare people senseless although it should be used with the disclaimer that it could be as many as 500 under optimal conditions but its rarely optimal in the world of biology.

    Bedbugs can lay eggs on sheets but it is not a common place to lay eggs as it means they are often killed due to washing before hatching.

    Sadly there is a lot of selling service on fear that goes around and I suspect one of the reason why people immediately assume its bedbugs is that they have been media'ed into a state of fear rather than educated into a state of fact.

    Hope that helps.

    David

  9. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,069

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Feb 27 2014 12:18:45
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Do bedbugs have a "sense" to avoid laying eggs on a surface that's too smooth or well-lit?

    How much pressure does it take to destroy an egg?

    Are any other animals attracted to eggs as a food source?

    What products/chemicals will cause eggs to not hatch?

    If there's DE around an egg and it hatches, is the nymph in for a short life?

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  10. JustChecking

    oldtimer
    Joined: Nov '13
    Posts: 782

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Feb 27 2014 17:41:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for your explanation, David!

  11. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Feb 27 2014 20:52:32
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Great questions, Cilecto!!!!

  12. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,132

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Feb 28 2014 14:03:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi Cilecto,

    Great questions and hopefully this will go some way to answer them:

    Do bedbugs have a "sense" to avoid laying eggs on a surface that's too smooth or well-lit?

    Certainly in terms of smooth surfaces yes, part of a presentation from the 2013 Denver meeting touched upon this in that a test area with both varnished and non-varnished surfaces were available to bedbugs. There was zero egg laying on the varnished smooth surfaces, OK new information to many but those that have read my optimisation in advance of bedbug infestations guide will now appreciate that we are a little ahead of academic research as we raised that one in 2011.

    I am not sure the same can be said about the lighting levels as it has not been specifically studied but given that "protected" areas are often also darker I think it is most likley that the protection is the key issue rather than the luminosity.

    How much pressure does it take to destroy an egg?

    I have not measured it in terms of newtons applied but you certainly don't need to be an arm wrestler to crush them. I favor the blade of a "butter knife" (they are blunt in terms of the blade so are inherently safer if you are not skilled with a knife) but spoons are also good tools to use. I used to have a specialist roller for dealing with the perimeter of box frames but super-heated steam negated the need for it. If you can break a cracker you can crush an egg.

    Are any other animals attracted to eggs as a food source?

    The issue here is that to actually be attracted to eggs you must be able to detect them. The level of metabolic activity is low and as such I suspect spiders and others creatures will eat them as they are found rather than actually being attracted to them. To date this type of biological control has not been effective.

    What products/chemicals will cause eggs to not hatch?

    To kill an egg a chemical would need to either smother the egg and thus stop respiration or have an ovicidal mode of action (one that targets eggs and development). Such chemicals are not legal in most developed countries because the risk to health is far too great.

    Its better to look at physical killing methods and ideally ones that do not require you to find every last egg.


    If there's DE around an egg and it hatches, is the nymph in for a short life?

    If the nymph is exposed to the DE yes as the lipids will be sequestered from the exoskeleton and it will dehydrate and die. Juveniles are obviously more prone to death than adults which has a more protective exoskeleton.

    Hope that helps and please keep the questions coming.

    David

  13. BigDummy

    oldtimer
    Joined: Dec '13
    Posts: 4,688

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Feb 28 2014 15:44:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    David, what are your thoughts on Cirkil products directly applied and as a residual on eggs?

  14. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,132

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Feb 28 2014 17:12:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    It's not approved in the EU so I can't verify the data that is out there.

    Personally, I doubt it would be an improvement over what we do already which tends to be more immediately effective.

    David

  15. made0fscars

    newbite
    Joined: Feb '14
    Posts: 17

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Mar 10 2014 18:20:37
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Are eggs usually laid on clothes around a bed area if they are left there for a long period? What about over the period of one night? In a small/new infestation for example?

    And if eggs are laid on clothes is it unlikely that the eggs will transfer from them to the skin if you wear the clothes again unwashed?

    I am curious to know how sticky/cemented the eggs really are, are they actually that much of a challenge to remove if not using high heat methods etc?

  16. ITortureBugs4Revenge

    member
    Joined: Nov '13
    Posts: 322

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Mar 11 2014 2:54:41
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I'm not an expert but I've heard that bedbugs may be attracted to residual body heat or other possible signals left on clothes that were recently worn, which makes sense when you think about it, so i would think it is certainly possible for bugs to move into clothing that is left near an infested bed and to lay some eggs there too.

  17. made0fscars

    newbite
    Joined: Feb '14
    Posts: 17

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Mar 11 2014 7:08:49
    #



    Login to Send PM

    and say if they did lay eggs there, the eggs are that sticky that if in contact with any part of the human skin, they wouldn't come off and stick to the skin? sorry if my questions sound repetitive, just wanna know the likelihood of eggs moving from clothing/fabric to skin..

  18. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,132

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Mar 11 2014 8:46:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    No its not usual for eggs to be laid on anything other than a stable and secure surface, as such clothes are a low risk. I have seen eggs laid on old clothes left on the floor for months and months but that was most likley because all of the real estate on the bed was used up.

    The glue / cement that is used to secure the eggs to surfaces becomes effectively solid when dry and as such egg transfer is a fear that does not happen. Also eggs would not attach to skin as they would not be laid there.

    Residual heat on clothes would not attract bedbugs but the used cloth smell might.

    In fact the more we discuss this the clearer it becomes that the FAQ should read:

    take your worst fears and throw they away as unfounded.

    There is obviously a lot of myth busting we still need to do.

    David


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

296,727 posts in 50,022 topics over 155 months by 21,871 of 22,354 members. Latest: mrdinosaur, BedBugNinja, citycpap