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Landlord Sending 200' Thermal--Art antiques etc HELP

(18 posts)
  1. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 17:25:37
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    Yup. 200 degree thermal tx upcoming.

    I have a lot of art and antiques and am worried about drying out furniture--twisting it and what not and varnishes on furniture... Paintings...

    ANybody been through this?

    All I was told was to put my meds and "make-up" in the refrigerator...

    Anything else I should know?

  2. BuggerBeater

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 17:39:07
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    While we wait for a specialist to give their input, I'll leave you with a thought: if they're not advising you to move out your tv and other electronics, then they're not worried about plastics melting or warping so wood should be more tolerant.

  3. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 17:41:29
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    Also wondering if thermal is overkill for a relatively light infestation...

  4. OhNoes

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 18:50:21
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    I would have loved thermal. I live in an apartment building, and I know it would have done a great 1st round job. (That said, I think my chem treatments may have done the trick.. #3 was today and we'll see how it goes). National PCO "inspector" aka salesman, said he doesn't like dogs or thermal (even though they offer thermal, or at least one of their local offices does). I figured out recently that the reason he said that probably has to do with the fact that a local company that works with the County to deal with the bedbug problem specializes in thermal and has a dog. Silly PCOs.

    Thermal, if done properly, is a great treatment method. That said, I'd hope that they put down a residual also.

    nycyn - 1 hour ago  » 
    Also wondering if thermal is overkill for a relatively light infestation...

  5. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 19:33:32
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    I think they should put down a residual as well. Except I don't know what a residual is. All I know is that they're going to dust outlets and whatnot.

    I don't know what pesticides are used but I'm wondering if it wouldn't hurt if that it was applied to the antiques and then maybe having something like moving blankets thrown over them?

  6. BuggerBeater

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 20:35:20
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    nycyn - 59 minutes ago  » 
    I think they should put down a residual as well. Except I don't know what a residual is. All I know is that they're going to dust outlets and whatnot.
    I don't know what pesticides are used but I'm wondering if it wouldn't hurt if that it was applied to the antiques and then maybe having something like moving blankets thrown over them?

    A residual is a pesticide that stays relatively long after it is applied. As for blankets on the furniture, that's not a good idea because it will defeat the purpose of thermal, which is to allow the items to be heated. If you're doing things to prevent certain antique items from receiving the heat, then any bugs in them will not die.

    If you have concerns about your antiques, speak with the thermal technician. They'll be able to answer your questions. They're probably used to dealing with such things.

  7. cilecto

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 20:49:04
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    200 sounds excessive. We've heard reports where expert technicians from reputable firms advised residents on what can/cannot make it. One approach is to keep delicates in a zone that will get warm enough, but not too warm. Another is to take them out of the house and return them as the house is cooling (but still hot enough to kill). Even so, we've had reports of things getting unglued and electronics dying. Unfortunately, it's now easy for anyone to buy heaters and do "thermal", results are mixed, from too cool (and exacerbated infestations) to too hot and damaged (or destroyed) properties. I'm concerned that either LL misunderstands what the pros are saying or is working with less than 100% experts.

    In your place, I'd document my concerns in writing, as well as take before and after photos of your things. I'd ask for the name of the company doing the work and try to determine if they're reputable.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  8. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 21:06:59
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    Cilecto:

    Thanks old friend.

    LL will not let me talk directly to a PCO. It's like some kind of Top Secret organization or something. What's that about?

    You know I know a lot about boogie bugs so it seems to me it would be most efficient if we could have a direct conversation. I'm capable of an informed dialogue...

    The "preppers" are another story but no time for that now. Except I will pat myself on the back for keeping them on the slow-down.

  9. Richard56

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 21:10:20
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    Are they treating adjoining units -- left, right, up, down? My concern with thermal in a a multi-unit building would be bugs escaping to cooler quarters only to return later. Personally, I'd look into combining the thermal with some sort of residual, be it chemical or DE. As to a "relatively light infestation", isn't having bed bugs sort of like being pregnant -- you either are, or you aren't. Good luck.

  10. djames1921

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 21:11:18
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    200 degrees is too much, things start acting funny at that temp, like plastics, etc. Make sure they are talking about the temp they will heat your stuff up to and not just the ambient air temp from their heaters. You don't need to heat things up to 200 degrees and it will harm certain things if you do. However if the unit blows 200 degree air into the living space and they monitor temps of things to make sure they sit around the 150's that is a different story.

  11. cilecto

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 21:38:09
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    >LL will not let me talk directly to a PCO. It's like some kind of Top Secret organization or something. What's that about?

    it could be that they don't want you to know who's doing it. Or, it could be that the PCO doesn't have the capability to handle an onslaught of consumer questions.

  12. Richard56

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 21:53:00
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    >LL will not let me talk directly to a PCO. It's like some kind of Top Secret organization or something. What's that about?
    ---------------------------
    Sound like a NYC landlord thing. A call or letter from your lawyer might loosen them up a bit.

  13. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 21:56:01
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    Why wouldn't they want me to know what's going on? Try as I might I can't think like this landlord?

    cilecto - 16 minutes ago  » 
    >LL will not let me talk directly to a PCO. It's like some kind of Top Secret organization or something. What's that about?
    it could be that they don't want you to know who's doing it. Or, it could be that the PCO doesn't have the capability to handle an onslaught of consumer questions.

  14. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 22:00:00
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    I just wrote them that I think I need an appraiser in here and so on. I have some VERY SERIOUS junk in here. They scoff. I guess I do need counsel. I've been cooperative as I could be so my kid can get off of the living room floor.

    Yes I am in Manhattan, NYC.

    Richard56 - 3 minutes ago  » 
    >LL will not let me talk directly to a PCO. It's like some kind of Top Secret organization or something. What's that about?
    ---------------------------
    Sound like a NYC landlord thing. A call or letter from your lawyer might loosen them up a bit.

  15. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 22:02:14
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    They want to make me look like I'm uncooperative so they can begin an eviction proceeding. But that's old news--they pulled that in the beginning.

    I'm exhausted. And my dog won't come to my bed anymore and THAT is weird.

  16. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Sep 19 2011 22:08:53
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    Down is sub-basement. I told them 10x it should be treated. (Saw disposed bedding down there)

    Up: Sympathetic neighbor who has since caulked the entire place. I keep them in the loop and I gave them some DE.

    Next door: Three guys sharing. They we're great too. Gave them some DE as well.

    What the landlord is doing is top secret/ Me--I blab to anyone who may be affected.

    Richard56 - 54 minutes ago  » 
    Are they treating adjoining units -- left, right, up, down? My concern with thermal in a a multi-unit building would be bugs escaping to cooler quarters only to return later. Personally, I'd look into combining the thermal with some sort of residual, be it chemical or DE. As to a "relatively light infestation", isn't having bed bugs sort of like being pregnant -- you either are, or you aren't. Good luck.

  17. Koebner

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Sep 20 2011 6:17:21
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    If you have art & antiques of any substantial value, there are professional conservators who can treat the items individually. Contact a good auction house for referrals. Those services don't come at all cheap though.

    If the items are less valuable, you might consider storage for 18 months. Items need to be securely wrapped - one or two small sachets of silica gel such as you find in the packaging of electrical goods can be added to avoid mould but don't overdo it. Place securely wrapped & sealed items into metal containers such as ammo boxes, seal those securely with duct tape & place into storage for 18 months. You need to visit the storage facility often to make sure that the tape seals are in place & undamaged.

    You must choose a good storage facility - somewhere where temperatures don't fluctuate too much & where damp & vermin are properly controlled. Also check that your items are covered by the storage company's insurance, especially against fire. Here in the UK, it's not uncommon for the store rooms & lockers within a building to be of metal construction - this miminises rodents & stops fire spreading should it occur.

  18. cilecto

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Sep 20 2011 7:39:52
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    There are several providers in the NYC area who will fumigate your goods outside the house.


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