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K9 visit Husband made to leave durning inspection

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  1. DebraM

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 7:03:02
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    We own an apartment condo in Edmonton, Alberta that just recently been diagnosed with bedbugs. They had a dog inspect my apartment yesterday but my husband was made to leave our home. The trainer said that my husband would be a distraction for the dog to do it's work. Do you know if this is true. I have not seen any bedbugs in my suite nor do me nor my family have any bites.

    Debra

  2. toledo

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 18:41:25
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    I didn't have to leave when the dog came through. I wanted to watch exactly what he did. Who says you have bed bugs? Is the dog affiliated with a pest control operator? Are they treating surrounding apartments? Do your neighbors have them?

  3. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 18:45:28
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    Odd. Was he interrupting or anything?

  4. nervousaboutbedbugs

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 19:23:11
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    I was also asked to leave during my K9 inspection... they told me it distracts the dogs. I would have preferred to watch, but didn't want to do anything to throw them off.

  5. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 19:27:39
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    I was of the impression the OP was permitted to stay?

  6. BBQueen

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 19:28:59
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    I was asked to step outside the room to avoid distracting the dog. I was just outside the door, though, and could hear everything.

  7. controlfreak

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 20:19:46
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    We were also asked to leave in the morning but when we came back they were in our unit. We waited outside and when the handler came out with the dog we asked him if there was anything. He said we are clear. 2 days later we got a notice from the landlord telling us the dog gave positive signal and the pco will be coming for the treatments. Since then we are living hell and as far as i can tell the only reason they did not want us there was to prevent us from requesting visual confirmation. They told me their dogs are always right but so far we haven't seen anything. They also refuse to give me a report about what they see during treatments. Apparently treatments are not to "see" but to "treat". I made them to put an active monitor in one of the rooms and there was no acitivity. I am trying to convince the LL to put the monitor to the other rooms for the last two weeks. I dislike anything that has k9 inspection in it...

  8. Jenn28

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 22:19:36
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    Controlfreak,

    Dogs have been known to be wrong. 4 days after my K-9 inspection back in May, I found 2 bed bugs in my bathroom. I was cleaning out the linen closet and they must have been hiding in the sheets up there. That is soooo stupid that no one was allowed to be present during the inspection and further more, you have every right to see the report. You pay rent to occupy that space, that is your living space and those are your things. Grrrrrr, that makes me mad. I would ring my landlords neck if I had one and they did that to me!!! Have you talked to your neighbors about a bed bug problem?

  9. buggied

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Oct 6 2010 23:56:59
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    We just had a k9 inspect 21 bedrooms and several large common areas, i stayed outside the door. But I know that the dog nailed every room that i was positive had bugs with out me telling them which rooms I suspected. And one room was odd because it was really far away from the other effect areas, also in a room i knew had a lot of bugs i heard the dog get excited just like they told me he would. I could see how the dog's senses could become over stimulated with too much going on...I was impressed with the inspection. My only concern is from now until the treatment, the bugs could travel to rooms previously deemed clear

  10. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Oct 7 2010 7:08:08
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    Asking the occupants to briefly vacate the search area is a sound practice.

    We need the K9 team to be focused during the search

    If you have watched "The Dog Whisper"program on Animal Planet... You have heard Cesar talk about the impact of energy levels on dog behavior... It is normal for someone to become highly anxious during an inspection... Having the client present changes the energy in the room for the dog and the handler.

    Sometimes, the K9 team has been instructed to report their findings only to management... The party that is paying for the inspection often places conditions on what information can or cannot be shared with residents

    Don't blame the dog for treatment decisions... Treatment decisions are made by humans... Building management usually has the final authority on which units are to be treated.

    In some cases, it is considered appropriate to treat units that are adjacent to a confirmed infestation... The practice is called clover leafing.

    .

  11. toledo

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Oct 7 2010 8:22:47
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    i knew had a lot of bugs i heard the dog get excited just like they told me he would.

    Funny! No excitement from my dog. He would mark the area by calmly sitting down. I just saw a drug experiment on t.v. last night. One of those drug sniffing dogs went through rows of people, in this experiment, to find the one carrying the drugs. So I don't buy the "distraction" excuse.

  12. LVK9

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Oct 7 2010 9:28:40
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    Here are my thoughts on this subject. The more a team practices operating with distractions the better the team can perform operating with distractions. Sometimes it is just easier to ask people to stay behind. I just ask people who want to watch the inspection to stay behind the team and not talk during the inspection. But I have had customers follow and then start talking and holding things out for the canine to inspect, this just breaks the rhythm of the inspection. I believe the team is most accurate when they get into a rhythm and maintain this rhythm. Sometimes when I go to a home there are young children home that are running around playing and doing what kids do. So I suggest that the team performs the inspection alone(for accuracy) and after the initial inspection, The team can do a partial second inspection to show how it was done.

    Toledo like I mentioned above the team used in your example probably has many hours training in this scenario.

  13. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Oct 7 2010 10:06:22
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    Distraction is an issue, not an excuse... If you want optimal performance from the K9 team... Asking clients to briefly vacate the search area is a good practice.

    I have been handling scent detection dogs for eight years... I have performed inspections under many different conditions... I have performed demonstrations in front of large groups of people and in noisy exhibit halls... I have had anxious clients and media crews film the inspection... I once performed an 8 hour court ordered inspection in a public school with an entourage of school officials, hired professionals, lawyers and a news camera man... An inspection can be performed under many conditions, but it is always best to reduce distractions... if we are going to optimize for accuracy.

    We can perform an inspection while you are burning incense, beating a drum and dropping french fries on the floor with a dozen cats roaming the room... but obviously these are not optimal conditions.

    Place a nanny cam in the room, if you have sinister suspicions about what is going on in the room while you are outside... if it is legal in your state...

    If there are bed bugs in the building.... Shouldn't we be more concerned about under treating than over treating? ... Skipping a unit that cannot be confirmed in a multiple unit building can create a reservoir of bed bugs that may re-infest the whole building... People sometimes tend to err on the side of treatment, if they have already identified live bed bug activity in the building.

  14. controlfreak

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Oct 7 2010 10:23:44
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    DougSummersMS - 2 hours ago  » 
    Asking the occupants to briefly vacate the search area is a sound practice.
    We need the K9 team to be focused during the search
    If you have watched "The Dog Whisper"program on Animal Planet... You have heard Cesar talk about the impact of energy levels on dog behavior... It is normal for someone to become highly anxious during an inspection... Having the client present changes the energy in the room for the dog and the handler.
    Sometimes, the K9 team has been instructed to report their findings only to management... The party that is paying for the inspection often places conditions on what information can or cannot be shared with residents
    Don't blame the dog for treatment decisions... Treatment decisions are made by humans... Building management usually has the final authority on which units are to be treated.
    In some cases, it is considered appropriate to treat units that are adjacent to a confirmed infestation... The practice is called clover leafing.
    .

    well, when I "blame" the dog, I mean the PCO or the handler obviously. I have nothing against canines and have high regards for their olfactory talents :). My problem is with the company my LL hired and the system they use, which includes dog inspections. I had several very unsatisfying talks/emails with them since and lost all my confidence in their qualification or judgment. That being said, unfortunately I have no saying about these treatments, how or when they should be done. I guess I should be happy that my landlord is proactive and takes things serious but it sucks to live in a place, pay rent for it and not have the right to be involved in such decisions. So from where I stand, the renter should be allowed to stay in during the inspection and after it is done, should have the right to request a visual exam at the sites the dog alerted. I think it would have a great educational value to actually see someone visually inspecting and finding hiding spots of these bugs and will eventually help the PCO to get rid of them since the occupant will know what and where to look. By cutting the renter out of the decision making process, both management and PCO make a big mistake.

  15. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Oct 7 2010 10:46:18
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    Controlfreak

    I follow your logic... Mandated treatment is a landlord / tenant issue... not a K9 issue

    I don't have any problem with occupants being present in the room to observe a manual search of any identified locations or showing the occupants any evidence that is identified during the search... It is real common for us to be restricted from sharing information by the landlord.

    K9 teams vary in quality... It is good that your building provides proactive K9 screening and aggressive treatment... I am sorry to hear that you do not have confidence in the company that was selected by your landlord.

    I fully agree with the concept of including tenants in the formulation of treatment decisions, but would point out that one uncooperative occupant can torpedo a building wide eradication effort.

  16. loubugs

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Oct 7 2010 11:03:31
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    jenn28, controlfreak, toledo & others,
    Would you mind sending me a PM, esp. if you are in NYC & vicinity, the names of the K9 companies who you used, esp. those who don't visually verify or tell you that they don't need to visually verify because their dogs are always right. I won't be sharing information -- I just need to know since I actually know many of them.
    You don't have to be necessarily out of the room, but distractions do happen. People don't even realize that they are causing distractions for the dog as they talk or gasp or try to give it all kinds of things to sniff during the inspection process.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.

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