Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Bed Bug Success Stories

It was a success, but it wasn't bed bugs [cheyletiella mites]

(53 posts)
  1. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 1 2010 0:22:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    After 3 months of itching, searching and endless laundry, one of our cats was diagnosed with cheyletiella mites - "walking dander." The only possible source was the 2 kittens we adopted in August. They are non reactors and were given a clean bill of health from the vet clinic. My older cat started getting itchy, but I thought it was just dry skin. All 3 cats were treated with Revolution and furniture was sprayed with Siphotrol. No bites for 2 weeks now. The whole time frame works out and the location of our bites makes sense, whereas it didn't for bed bugs.
    What I've learned:
    The people on this website are very helpful. Thank you to all of you!
    Think outside the box - your pets can be non reactors, too.
    There is an answer out there somewhere. I found mine right here on the forums and suggested that my vet check the cat for mites.

    Good luck to you all and I hope one day everyone will have a success story.

  2. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 1 2010 0:42:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I am very happy for you noway.

    It's not surprising: you fit the bite pattern to the pest. If only more people would think that way....

  3. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 1 2010 11:29:09
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, Bait. I hope other people can learn from this - faster than I did!

  4. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 1 2010 17:43:56
    #



    Login to Send PM

    noway,

    What is the bite pattern associated with this mite?

    Thanks!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  5. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 1 2010 18:48:29
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Initially, I was bitten mostly on my forearms and lower back. This was when the cats were in the bed, on my side of it. After I started using DE and OHDM in the bedroom, I kept the cats out of there. My bites diminished in frequency and were only on the backs of my thighs and backside. Probably from sitting on furniture where the cats slept. My husband was bitten all over his legs and chest the entire time. Probably because the cats were on my side of the bed and he was getting bitten while laying on the couch with the cats, both before and after we isolated the bedroom.
    Thanks again to everyone.

  6. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 1 2010 23:49:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Noway, before you disappear for good, were the bites like a rash - generalized and bumpy covering the itchy spot, or distinct single bites loosely connected, as in clusters or a line? And were your husband's bites the same as yours?

    Did you sleep through the night or wake up because you were bitten?

  7. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 2:02:54
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, noway! Like bait, I'd be interested in hearing a description or seeing photos (even though we know allergic reactions vary and so may bite appearance).

  8. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 10:53:36
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hello Bait and Nobugsonme
    The bites were distinct, separate red spots. They were single or in a cluster of 2 -5. They looked very much like mosquito bites. Unlike mosquito bites, they remained intensely itchy for about a week and took weeks to heal. I still have a few scars. My husband's bites were the same as mine, except for location.
    We did not awaken during the night. The bites were usually apparent first thing in the morning, but occasionally my husband's appeared while driving to work.Sorry, no photos of my backside -ha.The bites did closely resemble most of the BB bite photos that I've seen.
    http://hotels.about.com/od/hotelsecrets/ig/Bedbug-Bites/clc_bed_bug_bites.htm If this link works, this most closely resembles our bites, except not necessarily in a line.

  9. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 12:27:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Ghostbitten suggested that I post photos of the "culprits." Cute and innocent, huh?

    [photo links have ceased working as of 2/2011, therefore were removed by admin]

  10. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 13:28:13
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Oh yeah, they look like trouble! Too cute. Totally worth it in retrospect, I am sure, but I know you're glad to find the solution.

  11. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 15:17:47
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I am very glad to find a solution! And I can't blame the kittens; they were rescued and one was in rough shape. I blame whoever dumped them. Spay/neuter your pets!! But that rant is for a differednt website.

  12. ghostbitten

    junior member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 92

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 19:24:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Definitely blame who dumped them--they are absolutely freakin' gorgeous!!! Way too innocent to be much trouble... though, I believe you said they're at the chewing/biting/scratching stage XD

  13. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 20:38:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey noway,

    I looked up your introductory message and saw that you didn't have your bites where you'd normally find bed bug bites.

    "We both sleep in socks, sweats, and long sleeves. Neither of us has ever been bitten on exposed skin."

    I'm just reprising this for everybody else's sake.

    Again, very happy for you and love those kitties!

  14. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 20:46:53
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi Bait
    I agree - other than appearance and happening at night, our bites didn't have much in common with BBs. And also, according to my vet, cheyletiella mites are NOT common. He was convinced it was fleas - I was adamant that it was not - and the microscope told the truth of the matter. I hope other people can find a positive outcome as well.

  15. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jan 3 2010 0:58:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    You're the second person on this forum that said they had to talk the vet into looking under a microscope for cheyletiella. And the money they charge!

  16. elizchi

    newbite
    Joined: Jan '10
    Posts: 1

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jan 3 2010 11:10:59
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thank you SO much for this post!
    I am about 90% sure that I've been dealing with cheyletiella mites from my dog.

    It's been almost 6 months I've been getting bites. They have been annoying, but horrible. My husband hasn't had ANY, so I suspected it wasn't bed bugs. They are only under my clothes (back, chest, hips, butt, thighs). I've been to the dermatologist twice and she also didn't think bed bugs. I tore apart my bed and entire home looking for them with no luck.

    My dog has had some dandruff-looking stuff on his back, and I figured it was just dry skin, but I think it must be cheyletiella. Will make a vet appt. this week to confirm.

    Thanks again!

  17. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Jan 3 2010 11:26:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Good luck, Elizchi ! My cat was getting progressively itchier and had dander on her back. I too, thought it was just dry skin because omega 3 oil helped her. Don't let your vet call it fleas! Testing for cheyletiella is simple, painless and fast. So is the treatment. Let us know how it turns out.

  18. backpacker

    newbite
    Joined: Jan '10
    Posts: 3

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 2:17:04
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It was actually my vet that figured it out that I might have BB. I was sure it was fleas, and he said bedbugs. I brought my dog back 3 times, before I finally looked up bedbugs and the symptoms and where to look ect. Vets are not all idiots! The point here is go with your gut right - it always seems to be correct in one way or another. I as in denial about the bug, but I wan the only one ho thought we had something.....;.my husband thought I had gone mad.

    Yeah - we did beat them!!! It is possible!!!

  19. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 19 2010 17:13:19
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Update ---we've been a full month without a single bite. The cats had their follow up doses of Revolution. The scars are healing. I wish everyone success.

  20. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,085

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 19 2010 17:37:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  21. wchicago

    member
    Joined: Oct '09
    Posts: 268

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 19 2010 23:35:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Whoo hoo noway!! thats SUCH good news! congrats

  22. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,240

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Wed Jan 20 2010 9:52:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Nice! Congrats on the victory.

    Just goes to show that skin reactions are an indicator of a problem but you cannot prove it is caused by __________ without finding a sample or after eliminating ___________ and the skin reactions cease.

    Imagine, folks can get gotten tunnel vision on BBs and never get free of those mites.

    As Dr. Potter says, "Show me the bug!"

    Jim

  23. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Wed Jan 20 2010 16:22:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thank you all for your replies and I hope one day this website becomes unnecessary..

  24. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Wed Jan 20 2010 22:16:07
    #



    Login to Send PM

    spideyjg - 12 hours ago  » 
    Nice! Congrats on the victory.
    Just goes to show that skin reactions are an indicator of a problem but you cannot prove it is caused by __________ without finding a sample or after eliminating ___________ and the skin reactions cease.
    Imagine, folks can get gotten tunnel vision on BBs and never get free of those mites.
    As Dr. Potter says, "Show me the bug!"

    What he said!

    Well done, noway!

  25. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Wed Jan 20 2010 22:57:36
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Nobugs,

    Not sure what the last few posts are referring to but I agree we did a good job on this site in helping noway solve her problem.

    In her first posting, upon describing her bites and the circumstances surrounding them, this is what we said:

    "I might start researching mites . If washing the sheets helps and all the animals in the house it is more likely mites than BB."

    and

    "Your comment 'Neither of us has ever been bitten on exposed skin' is not typical of a bed bug bite. It also would not fit the larva theory."

    So I think one of today's remarks was ill-advised. We were right on track from the beginning, and I too am delighted with noway's success.

  26. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Jan 21 2010 1:36:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bait,

    I am not sure what you were troubled by above (or in which posts), but I did not mean to offend anyone.

    I understood Jim (spideyjg) to be commenting on a larger phenomena which happens on the forums quite often -- people assuming a certain cause for their problem without proof. This happens a lot -- people with mites thinking they have bed bugs, people with bed bugs thinking they have something else, people with folliculitis thinking they have bed bugs. It keeps people locked in a bad situation, until the true cause is determined.

    I understood Jim to be affirming that noway's case is not an example of this pattern, and I am agreeing with that: noway looked at all the evidence, kept an open mind, explored various possibilities, got the right input from the right people (like the vet), and eventually found some definitive proof, and was able to solve a mystery.

    I may in fact be wrong about what Jim meant, but that was the sentiment I was agreeing with!

  27. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,240

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Jan 21 2010 1:57:59
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Exactly what I meant Nobugs. Seen too many folks get tunnel vision and noway did not. Noway listened to other possibilities, explored them, found a potential cause, took action, and is now free.

    Hooray for noway's freedom \m/

    Jim

  28. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Jan 21 2010 17:14:15
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks again to everyone for their comments, concern and help. I couldn't have done it without this site and the great people here. But I still hope that someday the site will sit, forgotten and unused..=)

  29. lotsreh

    newbite
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 18

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Jan 21 2010 17:24:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Noway, you said you had to convince your vet to do a look under the microscope? Does that mean you can't see them, even if the vet inspects the animal with a flea comb? I had bedbugs awhile ago but keep getting small red bites, but I've been cleared by 5 exterminators. I get bites on my arms but nowhere else, and my cat sleeps near my arms and he has dandruff as well. I've never seen any evidence of bed bugs. My vet told me I have bed bugs (oy vey!) or fleas. I don't think it's either of these.

  30. lotsreh

    newbite
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 18

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Jan 21 2010 17:29:35
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sorry, I forgot to mention that I never get more than 2 bites (give or take) or so in a week. I feel like if it were bed bugs, they would have multiplied by now since I haven't had any treatment and there is nothing residual in my apartment.

  31. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 22 2010 1:11:52
    #



    Login to Send PM

    noway - 7 hours ago  » 
    But I still hope that someday the site will sit, forgotten and unused..=)

    That's been my hope since it started, noway.

    That bed bugs would cease to be much of a problem (again) and I could take up a new hobby.

  32. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 22 2010 1:13:36
    #



    Login to Send PM

    lotsreh - 7 hours ago  » 
    Sorry, I forgot to mention that I never get more than 2 bites (give or take) or so in a week. I feel like if it were bed bugs, they would have multiplied by now since I haven't had any treatment and there is nothing residual in my apartment.

    That is perplexing. How long are we talking, lotsreh?

    I don't know much about the mite noway had, but it seems like most pests would get worse and worse.

  33. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 22 2010 1:23:04
    #



    Login to Send PM

    If lotsreh is in a building with neighbors with BBs, there's no reason why s/he wouldn't have occassional bites.

    My theory is that bed bugs -given the freedom to do so, will "fish" for the perfect host. They bite only if they have to, until they find the "right stuff", then they go hog wild on that one.

    Bait

  34. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 22 2010 4:42:53
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bait,

    If they come into an apartment and bite the host, why would they then leave to seek another host?

    Why would they come in and bite twice a week but not stay and lay eggs and start an empire?

  35. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 22 2010 17:32:30
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hello lotsreh-
    If you comb through with a flea comb and get the dander, supposedly under a regular magnifying glass, you will see it move. Cheyletiella mites are sometimes called "walking dander." The mites themselves are microscopic. I have no idea if they would progressively multiply or not; I have 3 cats and only one is a reactor. They cannot live off the host for any length of time and cannot breed on humans, just bite us : (
    My husband and I were getting bitten equally, but in different areas that corresponded to our contact with the cats and/or their sleeping areas. Good luck! Let us know how it turns out.

  36. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 23 2010 0:27:03
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Nobugs,

    I'll try to comment on your post directed to me this weekend.

    It's late and I'm still at work.

    Bait

  37. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 23 2010 2:20:51
    #



    Login to Send PM

    No rush!

  38. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Feb 18 2010 20:51:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    2 months since our ordeal ended. There are still physical scars which I'm certain will heal. And emotional, which may not, and maybe shouldn't...a good friend said the old, " Good night, sleep tight, don't let the........" and I had to take a deep breath. Not for me, but because I know there are still good people here suffering through this. I wish you all the best.

  39. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Feb 18 2010 21:26:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey noway! Great to hear from you.

    You know about wchicago's success story, right?

    I will send you a PM later tonight if I can.

    Bait

  40. noway

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 58

    offline

    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Feb 19 2010 17:21:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Great news from wchicago!!
    Woo Hoo!!
    Now I want to read about everyone else's so this site can shut down....

  41. miteymaid

    newbite
    Joined: Feb '11
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Feb 26 2011 19:34:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Well I live in NYC and talked to two vets who didn't know what cheyletiella mites were. I finally found a vet in Ohio who said the condition is often misdiagnosed for fleas. Anyway, in the meantime I am trying to find out the best way to rid my apt. and myself of them as I don't have cats myself but believe they could possibly be coming from my daughter's cats although her cats and whole family are asymptomatic and she thinks I am crazy because these bugs are microscopic. I know mites are related to spiders but from what I think I hear you could use the same stuff you use for fleas and bedbugs. I am getting terrible bites all over so would like to attack the problem at home as fast and well as possible.

  42. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Feb 26 2011 20:22:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    miteymaid - 38 minutes ago  » 
    Well I live in NYC and talked to two vets who didn't know what cheyletiella mites were. I finally found a vet in Ohio who said the condition is often misdiagnosed for fleas. Anyway, in the meantime I am trying to find out the best way to rid my apt. and myself of them as I don't have cats myself but believe they could possibly be coming from my daughter's cats although her cats and whole family are asymptomatic and she thinks I am crazy because these bugs are microscopic.

    Hi miteymaid,

    I read a new article yesterday that referenced Cheyletiella mites. It said

    Cheyletiella mites (a dog, cat, and rabbit parasite) can attempt to feed on humans and yield a pruritic rash. However, these mites cannot sustain themselves on humans, so they cannot establish an infestation and thus yield only transitory, self-limiting discomfort. These mites are rare and easily eliminated on the canine, feline, or lapine host using currently available pet ectoparasiticides.

    In other words, Hinkle is saying that Cheyletiella mites can't live in your home except on a dog, cat, or rabbit.

    If they may be biting you when your cat is present, the solution seems to be
    (1) have daughters' cats tested for Cheyletiella mites, and if these come up positive,
    (2) treat cats with pet ectoparasiticides prescribed by the vet who did those tests.

    For reference, the article was:

    Curr Psychiatry Rep DOI 10.1007/s11920-011-0188-0
    Ekbom Syndrome: A Delusional Condition of “Bugs in the Skin,” Nancy C. Hinkle
    Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA) 2011

    (Note: although the article is primarily about the condition known as Ekbom Syndrom -- a.k.a. "Delusional Parasitosis" -- it outlines various diagnoses which should be ruled out in such cases, including scabies, bed bugs, bird mites, head lice, and springtails, and Cheyletiella mites. I am going to post a bit of information on it in another thread.)

  43. miteymaid

    newbite
    Joined: Feb '11
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Feb 27 2011 10:55:32
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Whatever I have they are not self limiting. I have an app't. for one of my daughter's cats in 2 weeks. I started getting bitten in '08 when she adopted these 2 kittens. Like I said she doesn't live with me but I'm over at her apt. alot. It turned out they had fleas and she started treating them. At the same time I started getting bitten at my home and had the pco spray for fleas. Then I was sprayed for bed bugs and this went on for a year and still bites but no sign of fleas or bb's. I got it to where it was manageable, some bites but I didn't feel them Then in Oct. my son-in-law brought over his computer and suddenly I started feeling these invisible bugs in the air and getting many more bites again. That is why I think they are cheyletiella mites that came over in the computer and are now feeding on me and I am having trouble getting rid of them and like I said I am getting tons of bites that feel like mosquitoes but are being made by these invisible creatures.

  44. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Feb 27 2011 13:00:42
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi miteymaid,

    We are told that Cheyletiella mites cannot live off of a pet (dog, cat, rabbit).

    If you have ruled out fleas, and bed bugs (which I would think would be showing signs in two years), then I recommend seeing a dermatologist.

    Carpet beetles do not bite but their presence can cause skin problems , so maybe it is as simple as that.

  45. murphyy12

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '11
    Posts: 1

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Jun 13 2011 21:58:32
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I know this thread is kind of old, but the SAME EXACT THING is happening to me. My apartment complex has been treated for bed bugs a couple of times in the last 2 months. I actually spotted 2 bed bugs on the corner of my bed one night (about 2 weeks after the initial treatment). I called management and another treatment was already scheduled. Every since this treatment (a little over 1 month ago) I have had my bed on a metal frame, on top of those ClimbUp bed bug traps (don't know if they actually work), and I have a mattress and box spring cover.

    Now here is the thing...

    I have noticed bites randomly every other week or every 2 weeks. It has been random. The bites have been on my wrists, middle of my back, and on the side of my right hand. The bites are EXACTLY as described by "noway." They are very itchy, last about a week or more, leave a little scarring, and are usually by themselves or grouped in pairs. They look exactly like mosquito bites, but a little more swollen and not very red at all.

    I also have a CAT. He has had a skin condition for quite come time. Skin flakes and bumps all over him and he LOVES to be scratched rather rough (I think he might be itchy). My roommate's Dad is a Veterinarian and said it is probably due to allergies from food. Needless to say he has been on hypoallergenic food for quite some time and the bumps went away momentarily, but have been back for a long time. He is always sleeping in my bed. I am 99% convinced it has to be cheyletiella mites.

    I have not had any signs of bed bugs in the entire year I have been in my apartment, aside from the 2 randoms that one night. I have been checking rather frequently and with my bed not touching any surfaces and the traps I am sure that it can't be bed bugs. I am taking him to the Veterinarian within the next week to see if it is indeed cheyletiella mites.

    Just wanted to say thank in advance to everyone on this thread. I am hoping and praying that it is cheyletiella mites and not bed bugs. Wish me luck!

  46. MissKris

    newbite
    Joined: Mar '16
    Posts: 10

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Mar 1 2016 22:24:43
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I know this is an older post but I'm living in hell right now dealing with what I believe is Cheyletiella mites in the apt. Got a cat a month ago. Anyone else going through this???

  47. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Mar 2 2016 2:51:59
    #



    Login to Send PM

    MissKris - 4 hours ago  » 
    I know this is an older post but I'm living in hell right now dealing with what I believe is Cheyletiella mites in the apt. Got a cat a month ago. Anyone else going through this???

    Hi MissKris,
    Your vet can test the cat for this problem.

  48. MissKris

    newbite
    Joined: Mar '16
    Posts: 10

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Mar 2 2016 13:55:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The vet said he had ear infection only. Treated for that. Saw lots of dandruff on cat. Did a Lyme sulfur dip...started cat on Revolution (salemectin). Sprayed whole place w pyethrin flea n tick spray, vacuumed, washed everything in hot water/detergent. Cat got more dandruff...bathed him in flea n tick shampoo. Second dose of Revolution 2 days post shampoo. I got lil tiny bites on my arms n a lil everywhere. Sooooo itchy!!! Like you want to run for the hills kinda itch. Anyway redid apt w bug spray vacuumed washed bedding again. Dermatologist put ME on ivermectin n gave me cream for itch. Craziest thing I'm going through. Cannot see anything. Must be microscopic. But can feel biting!!!

  49. loubugs

    old timer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 12,131

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Mar 2 2016 15:32:04
    #



    Login to Send PM

    FYI:
    Cheyletiella mites are larger than you think, adults reach about 1/3 mm.
    Cheyletiella blakei Smiley, 1970 — infests cats (Felis catus), USA (Washington DC)
    Cheyletiella parasitivorax — infests rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), France
    Cheyletiella romerolagi (Fain, 1972) — infests Romerolagus diazi, USA (New York)
    Cheyletiella strandtmanni Smiley, 1970 — infests hares (Lepus spp.), Taiwan
    Cheyletiella yasguri Smiley, 1965 — infests dogs
    C. yasguri and C. blakei are the species that affect humans since they are the 2 that will live on 2 kinds of our pets.
    Diagnosis is by finding the mites or eggs microscopically in a skin scraping, combing, or on acetate tape applied to the skin. Dandruff moving is from mites moving with some skin scales being carried by the mites. These mites don't live under skin but in keratin layer. 21-day life cycle is on one host and cannot survive off the host for more than 10 days.
    Ivermectin and Selamectin are used in treatment.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  50. MissKris

    newbite
    Joined: Mar '16
    Posts: 10

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Mar 2 2016 21:42:59
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thank you for the info. It's craziness I've never exp before. Uggg

  51. MissKris

    newbite
    Joined: Mar '16
    Posts: 10

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Thu Mar 3 2016 21:02:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I appreciate any and all advice and thank you for your taking the time to respond.

  52. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Mar 4 2016 11:40:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    You're welcome, MissKris

  53. MissKris

    newbite
    Joined: Mar '16
    Posts: 10

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Mar 14 2016 6:39:30
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I took my cat to the vet. He took a swab from his ear and thoroughly checked his fur and skin. Said no mites. Great. I was very glad to hear that. It's hard to say what it was or if there were any mites at all to begin with. But I swear they were here. I did a thorough job spraying apt 3 times over a six week period, vacuumed and washed bedding incessantly, was treated myself by dermatologist with Ivermectin and Eurax cream, shampooed cat twice with Lyme/sulfur and a flea shampoo. The cat had severe dandruff and I don't know if was r/t to Cheyeliella mites or not. He was treated with Selemetictin x3. Eventually the dandruff disappeared. I know cats can have Cheyeliella mites on skin but not show signs of scratching. In any case I do not have that feeling any more of getting bit, like pin pricking, or feel as though there are bugs crawling on me (with no proof). So I either eradicated them with my obsessive cleaning or it was all in my head. I truly believe it was those skin mites though, because it all just stopped after weeks of specific treatment and if this helps someone then I'm glad. I wouldn't wish this on anyone. What a nightmare!!! Thanks again for your input.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

294,804 posts in 49,552 topics over 153 months by 21,709 of 22,154 members. Latest: Jcschw, Zirrion, Natureboy325