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Is this a bed bug? Picture from microscope [a: psocid/book louse]

(11 posts)
  1. JonnyD

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Aug 18 2014 17:46:52
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    I found a load of these little bugs in the corner of my room under a piece of wood. They're all roughly the same size, about 2mm in length. They don't move very fast.

    Here is the picture of one of them caught on a cello tape and magnified under a microscope: http://i.imgur.com/nDzWxA4.jpg

    Thanks

  2. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Aug 18 2014 19:06:24
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    No, it is not a bed bug. It appears to be a booklouse/psocid.

    See if you can compare it to this photo that was ID'd earlier by the experts:

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/pic-id-bb-or-other

    I'm not certain it's a psocid . . . but I am certain it is NOT a bed bug!

  3. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Aug 18 2014 19:08:10
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    Hi,

    I am not sure if it's a book louse or something else, but I'm pretty sure it's not a bed bug. The head is much too big and the wrong shape for that.

    To be certain, wait for an expert opinion though.

  4. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Aug 18 2014 19:16:03
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    Abs got in there before I saw her post. She's really good too with her ID's, so you can relax and not worry.

  5. JonnyD

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Aug 18 2014 19:31:02
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    Thanks guys!

    It's upside down in the picture due to it being stuck to celo-tape from above so maybe that's what's throwing you off on being certain?

    If it is psocid these ones appear to be wingless.

  6. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Aug 18 2014 21:37:14
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    As correctly Abs stated, it is a psocid.

    Note that psocids, aka book louse/lice, are wingless critters !

    pjb

  7. JonnyD

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Aug 18 2014 22:16:26
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    P Bello - 38 minutes ago  » 
    As correctly Abs stated, it is a psocid.
    Note that psocids, aka book louse/lice, are wingless critters !
    pjb

    Cheers!

    Aren't some of them winged? How did they get into my room in the first place?

  8. loubugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Aug 19 2014 2:24:13
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    Note that psocids, aka book louse/lice, are wingless critters !

    Well, our common species, such as the one pictured in this post, is wingless, but there are some that are found in homes that have wings.

    Aren't some of them winged? How did they get into my room in the first place?

    Yes, but the wingless ones are able to crawl in; in fact, they are commonly found in home and they live outdoors. Some of the winged species are called barklice.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  9. JonnyD

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Aug 19 2014 8:12:09
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    loubugs - 5 hours ago  » 

    Note that psocids, aka book louse/lice, are wingless critters !

    Well, our common species, such as the one pictured in this post, is wingless, but there are some that are found in homes that have wings.
    Aren't some of them winged? How did they get into my room in the first place?

    Yes, but the wingless ones are able to crawl in; in fact, they are commonly found in home and they live outdoors. Some of the winged species are called barklice.

    Do they have swarm intelligence like ant colonies? Do their colonies use epigenetics (for lack of a better word) the same way as ants where ants give birth to more soldiers when there is a threat? For example, would Psocid start growing wings if there are spiders in the area?

  10. loubugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Aug 19 2014 9:04:05
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    NO.
    They don't live in colonies exactly, but in aggregations. There is no break down of labor, a caste system like ants and termites, for example.
    Actually ants don't give birth to more soldiers; maybe you mean termites since there are soldiers in their caste system much more than any are in ants. Certain ant species have major and minor workers and in some there is a sort of soldier (a major worker) where the head is enlarged to fit holes in the tunnels at the exits/entrances and that way there is a live door.

  11. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Aug 20 2014 15:49:49
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    Lou is correct as per usual !

    While we see psocids indoors commonly in humid & moist areas, the winged type psocids live outdoors.

    I've never encountered them indoors at any account working as a pest pro these many years.

    Thanks Lou !


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