Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tales of Bed Bug Woe

Invisible infestation!

(21 posts)
  1. Ladygirl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jun 8 2011 20:57:19
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    So I've got bedbugs. I very unwisely bought a couch from someone on craigslist in March. (Learned that lesson the hard way unfortunately! Never gonna do that again.) Now I've got little visitors. I didn't use the couch much, I spend most of my time in my room or out and about. But my roommate spent ALL his time on the couch because he was a lazy guy. Anyway, he was having bites but he didn't know what they were, he thought he was just having itchy skin due to the weather. I took away his bed about six weeks ago (long story) and the only place I could store the mattress was behind my own bed. Soon after, I got my first bites. After a few days I finally figured out what they were... We got rid of the couch and his mattress/boxspring ASAP, washed every stitch of clothing and linens we own in hot water and dried everything on super hot, got rid of our pillows, bought new pillows and bedbug zippered pillowcases and zippered mattress bags for our mattress/boxspring. We vacuumed every inch of the apartment, all over the remaining furniture, including inside drawers and cabinets... EVERYWHERE.

    But they were still here after a couple weeks. So, since my boyfriend and I are very very poor and cannot afford a professional, (otherwise we would have started with a professional instead of doing all that crazy cleaning!) we decided to try a fogger. It's been a few days now, and I've got hives. I'm not sure if I'm responding to bites received before using the fogger, or maybe the fogger just didn't work. (I'm not sure how long it can take for reactions from bites to manifest)

    The main point is, we've inspected every inch of every piece of furniture we own, and can't seem to find anything. No feces, no eggs, no molted shells... We've only been able to capture a couple of the bugs. We have no idea where they could be, and we are at our wit's end here. We don't sleep much, none of our friends want to be around us anymore, even my own parents are skittish about seeing me. Not to mention the unsightly hives and all the itching. We don't know what to do since we can't afford a professional, and can't seem to find out their hiding place to spray/clean. Suggestions?

  2. Ladygirl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jun 8 2011 21:34:46
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    The more I read on this forum, the more I see how bad of an idea using the fogger was... We were just so desperate(and still are!) and it's nearly to the point where I feel like I could cry. We've inspected all lighting fixtures, and even removed all the plates off of electrical outlets and switches to search for the bugs, but they're nowhere to be found, like I said. I'd really rather not ditch all my furniture since everything looks good, but I'm so frustrated with them and sick and tired I kind of want to ditch everything just to be 100000000000% sure! ('tis very unfortunate because I just bought my desk in February, and my dining room set was a graduation gift and is very nice.)

  3. Covky

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 8:11:10
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    I am early on to this issue myself, and am in the manic, no real sleep in 5 nights stage. However, I would recommend that you consider trying to find a business that brings out a dog to find the source, it does not appear 100% but at least you would have an idea of where to start.

    Having read all the forums here it appears that anything other than Thermal treatment is basically a scam until you rob, beg, borrow or kill for enough cash to have thermal done. No one does upfront pricing, no one details their procedures, they all high-pressure-sale-you on quote calls. Regardless of Vikane, Heat, Chem, etc. they all seem hard to work with. The ones who post here (many seem helpful) all argue about everything and the real fact seems to be that no one really knows what to do.

    I would kill for a place that just listed prices based on infestation levels and house size.

  4. Jenn28

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 10:30:33
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    Ladygirl (cute name),

    If you're renting, can't your landlord hire someone? It would be a shame to have to leave your things behind because of this.

    I have a friend who is fond of Craigslist and second hand shops. I've told her to be careful but she really doesn't listen. I hope that she doesn't end up finding out the hard way. I don't ever want to have to tell her "I told you so".

  5. sluggums

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 11:49:25
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    Have you tried DE? I bought 5 lbs of it online {MORE than enough, sort of a lifetime supply, one lb is plenty!}, it wasn't that expensive, and I believe it really really kills them, they walk on it and die. I spread it with a plastic ketchup container and a paintbrush, wearing a face mask. It will dry the hell out of your skin for a few days. You just need the lightest dusting of it in cracks and baseboards, please read the resources listed on this site for more explicit instructions. I also vacuumed like a maniac, steamed the upholstered furniture, and also sprayed all my furniture {old crap, wouldn't get ruined} with 90% rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle. I then clear caulked every space between baseboard and floor/wall and any small crack I could find. Wash the floors with Murphys Oil Soap. Get climbups for your bed, they're also inexpensive. Good luck. This site is an incredible resource if you have to do this yourself, I wish you the best.

    BTW, do you have neighbors that share walls/floors with you, and could they be infested as well? If so, everyone needs to get treated/inspected at the same time.

  6. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 12:04:55
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    Covky - 3 hours ago  » 
    Having read all the forums here it appears that anything other than Thermal treatment is basically a scam until you rob, beg, borrow or kill for enough cash to have thermal done.

    I don't agree.

    You can get rid of bed bugs using thermal or Vikane, traditional spray/dust/steam treatments, or even (with some persistent re-treatments, perhaps) Cryonite. Not all would be my first (or even third) choice, but they can all work.

    Knowing a lot about bed bugs is much more valuable than any particular methodology. That's where those who fail probably do so most often.

    If you're going to self-treat, don't run out and buy something someone recommends here. Learn as much as you can first.

    Read the FAQs. Read the items listed under Comprehensive Guides to learn how to find and kill bed bugs. Our FAQ on steam and DE may be particularly useful, but I can't stress enough that you need to read before you try to self-treat.

    Yes, fogging is a bad idea. Research will help you avoid other missteps.

    As Jenn said, your landlord may be responsible for treatment (if you rent and depending where you live). If so, you should probably go with this rather than trying to self-treat, which is a last resort for those who absolutely cannot get a professional.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 12:18:24
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    Covky - 4 hours ago  » 
    Having read all the forums here it appears that anything other than Thermal treatment is basically a scam until you rob, beg, borrow or kill for enough cash to have thermal done. No one does upfront pricing, no one details their procedures, they all high-pressure-sale-you on quote calls. Regardless of Vikane, Heat, Chem, etc. they all seem hard to work with. The ones who post here (many seem helpful) all argue about everything and the real fact seems to be that no one really knows what to do.

    OOPs make way for another sweeping generalisation.

    Thanks, its post like this that make some of us wonder why we hang out here to help people.

    Sorry but I think you owe a number of us an apology for that one. I certainly resent the implication that "no one knows what to do" I guess my 19,500+ successfully cleared infestations were all just pure luck.

    David

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  8. Covky

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 12:45:58
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    OOPs make way for another sweeping generalisation. Thanks, its post like this that make some of us wonder why we hang out here to help people. Sorry but I think you owe a number of us an apology for that one. I certainly resent the implication that "no one knows what to do" I guess my 19,500+ successfully cleared infestations were all just pure luck.
    David

    David, I have read every post back to 2006 on this site. Anyone claiming to have all the answers about bedbugs is clearly wrong, all anyone can do is apply the practices they find to work. There are no sure-fire solutions because everything is open to operator error. I am sorry your industry has so many fly-by-night operators who give it a bad name, but it is really them who owe the worthwhile PCOs an apology, not me. I asked for help here and was referred to one company that has not even returned my calls. Looking at the recommending persons history and others comments on his, I suspect he might be basing it on his involvement in the industry.

    I have read things talking bad about Gentro, and things praising it, I have read that DE really does nothing and it is the best thing since sliced bread. Almost everything posted here has been contradicted by others. Even the FAQs are 50/50 on some issues. I truly appreciate this resource, but the arrogance of thinking that you deserve an apology from people have not slept for a week and are confronted with a horrid plague is silly.

    I am impressed by your numbers of successful clearing, in ten years of working 365 days a year, you would have cleared 5.3+ infestations a day. In a twenty year career working everyday that would make it 2.7 a day. I think that makes you superman, and wish you were in the states.

  9. Buggybumpers

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 13:06:15
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    [Thanks, its post like this that make some of us wonder why we hang out here to help people.]

    David, don't forget you sell products here, too.

  10. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 13:15:32
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    Ladygirl,

    There is both some very good and some very bad advice in the posts above.

    First, you never have to apologize to us for using a fogger in the situation you were in when you used it. Not everyone knows everything about bed bugs from birth. In an ideal world, you would have found this site and stumbled across that advice before you used the fogger, but you didn't. Nothing you can do about it now except not do it again. It happened. It was unfortunate. Nothing will change either of those facts, so let's move on and see what we can do now.

    Part of the problem with bed bugs is that they behave very differently than other pests (something I've learned from the professionals here who've taken the time to educate us about bed bug behavior and physiology), but a lot of people don't really know that. If you have fleas, foggers can work. So if you've battled fleas before, it's a pretty common leap of logic to assume that you could do the same with bed bugs. If I hadn't had friends who gardened, which meant I knew a little about integrated pest management, and if I hadn't worked for a study in the mid 1990s that was using a new product to try to help control roaches (Avert, if I remember correctly), I'd have assumed that one pesticide worked on most bugs too.

    It doesn't help that some companies sell sprays with packaging that makes it look like you can treat bed bugs the way you treat roaches or ants.

    Second, at this point, I wouldn't start tossing furniture. I've been on these boards for about three years now. I've seen many, many people who start throwing out everything but only later realize that they didn't need to ditch their beloved Great Aunt Millie's desk, or the oil painting they did when they were 16, or their expensive bed.

    I have only seen maybe two or three people who had professional treatment over and over but said "You know, that couch was really hard to treat because it was so overstuffed. I kind of wish I'd ditched it after the second treatment."

    From your description, it sounds like you're much more likely to be in the first category. I wouldn't throw anything else out.

    Third, I know you're stressed about money, but I would investigate to see who is financially responsible for bed bug treatment where you are. Why?

    If I'm reading your story correctly, the following things are true:

    1. You've never had a professional or someone on the boards here look at an actual bug sample and confirm that the bug in question is definitely a bed bug.

    2. You're tried self-treatment that hasn't worked.

    Given those two facts, my next step would be to suggest that you find a pest management professional in your area who has experience with bed bugs.

    At the very least, you want to get those samples conclusively identified as bed bugs. If you have any digital camera (even a cell phone one) and a magnifying glass, you can post the images here and people can identify them for you.

    I say that because we do get people who don't have bed bugs but do have look alike bugs (like bat bugs) or another pest, and treatments are different depending on what you have.

    I don't know where you're located geographically (and you certainly don't have to tell us), but you might want to contact your local tenants rights organization to see who is financially responsible for bed bug treatment where you are. If it's not the tenant, than I would contact your landlord next.

    If it's the tenant, then you're in a tough spot because really the best path forward is to hire a professional to treat the problem. If that's really not an option (and believe me, I get that for some people it really, really isn't no matter how many treats they give up to save money to pay for it), then you're going to have to give yourself a crash bachelor's degree level course in pest control if you want to have any hope of successfully treating the problem. We don't advise self-treatment around here because it's very hard to do safe, effective self-treatment on bed bugs.

    Let me give you an example of why that's true:

    Bed bugs are, in a sense, badly named. People assume that bed bugs harbor in the bed itself. Some do. But that's not the only place they harbor.

    Bed bugs spend most of their day NOT on the host that provides food. (this is different than fleas and ticks, for example. Both those pests will spend a lot of time living directly on the host. That's why things like Advantage and flea collars can work in the battle against fleas.)

    Bed bugs like to harbor *close* to their food source. (Because, really, would you want to have to walk the equivalent of 5 miles to get to your fridge just to eat? I wouldn't.) But they also like to hide away and be safe so they don't get killed.

    Many bed bugs will harbor, for example, in a box spring. If left undisturbed they'll harbor on the bed itself. (I had some living merrily under the pillow on the side of the bed I didn't sleep in. This is partly because my sheets didn't get changed as often as they normally would because I developed an infestation during a period of time in which I was traveling a lot. I found a bunch of eggs and nymphs living there as happy as you please. ICK.)

    But they don't just harbor in furniture. They'll gladly live behind electrical outlets, between the baseboard and the wall, or even (rarely) inside electronic devices that are close to a bed (like clock radio on a nightstand.)

    Your original post says that you're having trouble finding the bugs. There are several possibilities as to why. It's possible that you don't have bed bugs. You might, for example, have carpet beetles whose larvae have hairs that irritate the skin and produce allergic/irritated responses that look *exactly* like bug bites in some people.

    It's also possible that while some or many of the bugs were harboring on the couch, there are now some living between the baseboard and the wall, or in an electrical outlet behind the couch, or any number of other places that we can't check. It's also possible you've looked all those places.

    (Readers other than the original poster should note that part of the reason that we discourage the use of foggers is that there seems to be solid evidence to suggest that bed bugs may react to the chemicals in foggers by running away from them, which can mean that you end up with a more deeply entrenched infestation.)

    I don't tell you this to discourage you even though I suspect it'll have that unintended consequence.

    I tell you this to drive home two things:

    1. A good PCO who is experienced with bed bugs and knows how to treat them is generally going to be much more effective and efficient at finding where the bugs are harboring than you are. When you pay a professional, part of what you're paying for is that expertise.

    2. If you cannot afford a professional, you have to train yourself to be as close to one as you can get to be.

    That means you need to understand how the chemicals and other substances you're going to use work, including what the signs of overexposure are. There's a reason that many chemical pesticides ar limited to use by licensed professionals--namely, they can be deadly if misused. Even "natural" substances are not necessarily safe if you don't know what you're doing.

    DE is a great tool, but a lot of people read that it's natural and assume that natural means safe. I cannot stress how not true this is. DE is a major inhalation hazard; many professionals will not treat structures that have had DE applied--and that's because they are guarding their own safety.

    DE takes a long time to kill bed bugs (up to 10 days, I think, after exposure), and many, many people who use it overuse it. They apply mounds rather than a barely visible dusting. They don't wear an N95 respirator while applying it. They ignore the fact that it will kill your vacuum cleaner. And they apply it in places where it will get kicked up into the air--like directly on the mattress and box spring or all over the floor.

    Again, I'm not trying to discourage you. I'm trying to spell out a clear example of why self-treatment can be dangerous and ineffective.

    If you must self-treat, make sure you read all the appropriate FAQs on the site. And only self-treat as a very last resort.

    You've already had a pretty sucktastic introduction to why it's so important to learn about bed bugs before you try to treat them. I'm really sorry about that; your situation sucks, and I don't wish that on anyone. (It doesn't suck as much as some situations I've read about, though. I don't know if that makes you feel better, but I thought it bore mentioning.)

    Bed bugs can be eliminated from a home. They can be eliminated with many different kinds of treatments. Educate yourself thoroughly before you do anything else, figure out what will and won't work for your situation, and hang in there.

    And here is where I move on to address some of the things Covky said.

    I know that as a newbie--especially as a sleep deprived, stressed out newbie who was completely freaked out that evil vermin had invaded my house--I was overwhelmed when I started reading the boards.

    There were these obscure debates going on among professionals (I think certification of scent detection dogs was the one I wandered into when I got here without realizing it was a Debate.).

    Some people looked to have battled bugs for years without ever getting rid of them.

    Some people swore by steam.

    Other people swore by Vikane.

    It was really overwhelming.

    I wanted what it sounds like Covky's post is asking for: one clear protocol that is agreed upon as being effective for bed bugs so that I could evaluate potential pest controllers as being good or not.

    However, I think it's important to keep the following in mind:

    Every infestation is different.

    There are some commonalities. We know what kinds of places bed bugs like to harbor, but the circumstances of a particular infestation will affect how those commonalities play out.

    I have to agree with David and Nobugs on this; there are many forms of treatment besides heat that can eradicate bed bugs from a residence.

    I'm more fond of some than others (I'm not a big fan of Cryonite. Or, more accurately, I'm not a big fan of the way that Cryonite seems often to be marketed to consumers. I think some pest control companies oversell what Cryonite can do without emphasizing to customers that it likely won't solve the problem by itself in one treatment. I'm also someone with insomnia, so the idea of being bait for weeks doesn't sit well with me. That makes me a bigger fan of heat, but I was perfectly willing to live with the trade off of damage. Not everyone will be willing to live with that trade off, and even as a fan of heat, I wouldn't say that it's the only effective solution. I think heat would probably be a lousy solution, for example, for a DJ with a lot of vinyl in a small apartment.)

    But those specifics prove my point. For someone with chemical sensitivities, repeated Cryonite treatments can be a useful method for getting rid of bed bugs and lowering their overall exposure to pesticides. Some people would rather spend less money on a professional treatment and invest more of their own elbow grease time in prepping and don't mind getting bitten by bugs, so they're cool with chemical treatment (which tends to be less expensive up front than Vikane or heat). Some people want them gone gone gone now now now and are okay with risking damage to their stuff from heat.

    It's important, for example, to know that with heat I had to remove all my CDs and DVDs, and then I had to find a way to "treat" those since they weren't in the apartment during the heat treatment. If I'd had a more dispersed infestation, that might not have been the best choice.

    All of us have different priorities when it comes to the trade offs we're willing to put up with when it comes to the method that we choose (or that we have forced on us if we don't get to hire our own PCO) to treat the bugs.

    No two infestations are identical.

    If no two infestations are alike, expecting all treatments to be alike--or expecting all professionals in a field to agree on everything--may be unrealistic.

    I *get*--I totally get--why those of us with bugs want it to be that way, but in the long run, it's probably better that the pros are out there debating what does and doesn't work because in the long run those debates improve the treatment that most of us get--when we get treatment from good PCOs.

    I do also get that when you're at Bed Bug DEFCON1, you don't want to listen to obscure debates about stuff that seems irrelevant to your situation, but some of those debates have helped me understand bed bugs better in the long run, and that's helped me feel more in control of my life and better able to avoid reinfestation in the future.

    At any rate, hang in there Ladygirl. Apologies in advance for any typos. That took longer than I thought, so I don't have time to edit it because I've got stuff I need to do.

  11. Buggybumpers

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 13:16:09
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    To Ladygirl--have you tried looking at the bottom of the couch? Most of them have a kind of flimsy material stapled to the bottom--as do box springs. But this material can get torn or it is probably not too difficult for these small bugs to find a way past it, regardless. Just as they were hiding inside my box spring [when I thought they were "invisible"], they may be hiding inside your couch and you may be able to see them if you tip it over and take off that material. However, make sure you have a spray bottle on hand filled with 91% alcohol when you do. Spray the heck out of the underside of that sofa. By doing this you will not get rid of all your bugs, but you might be able to make a dent in the population.

  12. Ladygirl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 15:03:48
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    Thank you all for your responses!
    There is a special bedbug clause in my lease contract that clearly states I am financially responsible for professional treatment. That simply isn't an option for me. I am a student out on my own, living from hand-to-mouth, worrying if I'll be able to pay for my next semester of school.
    Buggybumpers, I have disposed of my couch. I don't have much furniture, just a dining room set, a coffee table, a bed, a TV stand, and a desk...

    I had heard about them living in electronics and things, so we did a thorough search of our stuff, my boyfriend even dismantled his computer! And we searched behind every single electrical outlet plate to see if they were hiding in the walls... No such luck there either.

    I haven't bought any chemicals or quick-fix products, aside from the pack of foggers. (I did buy zippered mattress bags and pillowcases, though I think that was a wise investment.)

    I will definitely see about getting some pictures up of some of the captured bugs ASAP.

  13. Buggybumpers

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 15:07:25
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    Oh, wait--reading again I see you no longer have the couch. Good move getting rid of it. It's hard to keep track of all that is said in a long post but did you get rid of all the mattresses and box springs in your place? How about chairs? And where do you keep your clothes? If they are in the drawers, no good. It makes for too many hiding places for the bugs. As to those encasements, you have to inspect them regularly for tears. Mine for the box spring got a little hole from a raised spot on the frame. I then put a second encasing over the torn one and tapped over the places on the metal frame that I thought might be problematic. I should have done it in the first place, but all this is a learning experience. The encasements are rather fragile.

  14. Buggybumpers

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 15:14:04
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    Ladygirl, I see our last posts came in simultaneously. Have you checked under the seats of those dining room chairs, too? I'm not sure if you're encasing old or new mattresses, but what I said about checking the encasements frequently still goes. The bugs can get in as well as out.

  15. Ladygirl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 15:14:15
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    Actually folks, my dopey boyfriend threw out the bugs we had captured in a ziplock.
    Two of the ones we caught before using the fogger looked exactly like this though:
    Here!
    Which led me to think maybe the majority of the infestation was in the couch and/or mattress we ditched, and that perhaps they had laid eggs somewhere else before we got rid of the stuff.... I dunno.

    We haven't caught any since using the fogger, but like I said, I've got hives, one of which had swollen to the size of a quarter until I put some ointment on it!

  16. Buggybumpers

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 15:17:19
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    Yes, that is a bed bug.

  17. Ladygirl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 15:19:54
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    I just bought my queen mattress set in February, the mattress set I ditched was an old twin set I had since I was 7, that I let my former roommate use. I ditched the twin set and bagged up my queen set.
    I have 10 week old kitten, so we do check the encasements often (he's so energetic and loves to play, so those nails are a hazard to them!)
    I just checked the dining set again, it looks ok.

  18. Buggybumpers

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 15:44:52
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    I am on the horns of a dilemma, myself, right now. Last month, after fighting BBs for half a year, I gave up and put myself on a waiting list in another building. I was willing to get rid of all my furniture, appliances--everything but some clean clothes and a few things I could seal up in plastic bins. This month I am not sure if I still have bed bugs or not. I don't see anything but I have a few itchy places on my legs. Are they bites? I don't know. I don't see any shed skins on my sheet and a black spot--I don't know if it's bug fecal matter or just a glob of my mascara that fell off. It's pretty small. I have an appointment at the new place in a few days for an interview and I have no choice but to go because, if I still do have bugs, I am not staying in my present apartment. SEVEN sprayings is all I can take [the stuff they spray gives me some asthma even after it dries] and I don't want any more. If it hasn't worked by now--well, you get the picture. Recently, I went on a short vacation [following all the protocols] and, while I was gone, the management here promised to steam my furniture--but it didn't happen. Then I was told that they'd rather do it while I was here.
    Nothing has been done and they know I'm back because we have on site management. I am not wealthy, either, and it is not that easy to find a decent apartment that I can afford. I asked the person who set up an interview for me if I need to move into their first vacancy--which will be in a few days. I was told "no" and that my screening process might take awhile, anyway, even though my name is now first on the waiting list. So I guess that gives me a bit of leeway. The trouble is--a few BBs are much harder to spot than many. But I don't want to hang around here to get "many". There is no end to how these little f*****s can complicate ones life.

  19. Ladygirl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 16:11:29
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    Yes, it's so frustrating. I checked out the FAQ and read about DE, extensively. I think I'll give that a shot. I don't $300+ to shell out for a packtite, or any other kind of steam vacuum.

    I am supposed to go on a trip to the beach with my family in a couple of weeks but I'm scared that I'll give them bedbugs too! The FAQ doesn't cover much about safe traveling if you are a host.... Pretty much all I got was to wash and seal away clothes that are going with you, keep as much as possible sealed away for as long as possible....

  20. BugsInTO

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 17:14:08
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    Generally, landlord / tenant legislation is "protective" legislation which means that the landlord can't "contract out of the law". I am not a lawyer. It is just a concept that understands that if a law sets out the parties' obligations, then those are the obligations the legislators meant the parties to have. They didn't mean "just until someone can slip an exclusion into the lease and get the tenant to sign it."

    Still check with your local tenants right organization and find out more.

  21. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jun 9 2011 17:26:54
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    Seconding what BugsinTo said.

    Your lease may say that tenants are responsible for bed bug treatment. But it may not be legal to put that into a lease.

    Whether you want to fight that battle is another question, but I would definitely check with your local tenants rights organization to find out whether that's the case.

    While I think DE can be a useful part in a plan to eliminate bed bugs, I don't think it will solve an infestation problem on its own. In addition, it's important to consider the possibility if you're in an apartment that neighboring apartments might be infested. You suspect the bugs came in with the used couch, and it's possible that they did.

    But if they didn't--if they wandered over from an adjacent unit--treating just the one apartment won't solve your problem.

    In addition, even if the couch brought them into your apartment, it's possible that the bugs moved into other apartments.

    For that reason, it's really important to talk to the tenants rights organization in your area and see what your rights are.


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