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Interesting Thermal Clip

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  1. paulaw0919

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 11 2008 8:51:57
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    Here's an interesting clip on what Thermal treatment procedures consist of.

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Video Player

  2. Bugologist

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 11 2008 9:40:53
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    This is one way to do it using one company. Other companies have drastically different set-ups. This set-up is using propane heated forced air. Most of the other companies out there are getting away from gas powered heat to kill bed bugs because of the concerns associated with it. Large cities won't even allow that type of system to enter (NYC for instance) or at least not without major issues. Because of that, most other companies are looking at electric powered heat. Some of those systems use either the electricity provided by the home or mobile generators.

  3. BakedBedBugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 11 2008 19:45:39
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    Yes, Temp Air and Thermapure both use electric heaters from time to time. Temp Air uses electric heaters almost exclusively.

    We use Electric heaters once in a while as well. We also use direct fired propane heaters like the one pictured, indirect fired forced air heaters we even use hydronic heaters like the ones here: http://www.dryair.ca from time to time. The challenge is always balancing the time the client needs to be out of the home versus labor cost. The fact is Electric heaters are too slow, unless you have Huge power available, or the client can be out of the home for 24 hours.

    As much as I hate direct fired propane heaters they are still the most efficient, cost effective way to deliver this service, where it is possible. Want to have the average price be a minimum of $1200 - $1800 per job regardsless of size? Keep using electic heaters. As a provider in New York recently commented, he usually sends a crew of 4 workers to a site and it usually takes 24 hours to complete SECTIONS of someones home. We can treat an entire 3000 square foot home in 8-12 hours using propane heaters. With three workers. You could not do that with electric heaters.

    I am curious about the comment "other companies". Currently there are only two companies who control all the patents and intellectual property around thermal remediation: ThermaPure and Temp Air. Anyone else trying it are in direct infringement with the above mentioned two companies. Further they are trying re-invent the wheel and are certain to experience signifigant challenges perfecting their process when TempAir and Thermapure have been sucessfully treating homes with heat for many years now. As someone who started in this industry with the thoughts "I can do that! Piece of cake, been heating structures for nearly a decade now. How hard could it be?" I quickly changed my mind when I realized #1) Someone was going to sue for infringing on thier patents and #2) There is a lot more to this than drying out a structure or heating a structure for construction and I could burn a place down or set off the sprinkler system and flood an entire building.

  4. aballen

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 11 2008 22:26:16
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    I spoke to the owner of the company today. They are coming Monday to give me an estimate. I will likely hire them as I have tried it all, poison, more poison, hubby using poison, K9, still getting bites. Thanks for posting this clip, I missed it last week on the news. I am very exicted and have renewed hope after seeing this. This is supposed to kill mites and even mold!

  5. Bugologist

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 11 2008 22:33:51
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    Baked,

    You must be a representative from Thermapure so I know your company was at Pestworld and one of the big booths was the new company who brought a system to market. In fact, here's an article:

    http://www.hotelmotel.com/hotelmotel/News+Wire/Massey-Services-partners-with-Chromalox-launches-T/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/560207

  6. BakedBedBugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 12 2008 11:31:45
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    Please, call me Tony.

    I'm not a ThermaPure Representative, nor was I at Pest World. I am a Thermapure Licensee though. I've seen the article mentioned, and had a look around Massey's Website. I've also read both of the patents that Thermapure and Temp Air have. Everything I've read and seen suggests that Massey is in violation of those patents. In any case, it is no skin off my teeth, I just want to make sure that the consumer and the industry does thier homework and understands the risks.

    The meat of my comments really were meant to address what appears to be your dislike of LP fired heaters. Facts are facts and LP heaters are, by far, the most efficient way to supply the heat required for a thermal treatment. If we are trying to make thermal treatments more affordable and accessible then Propane is here to stay. I know that there are a few jurisdictions where LP is not an option. They are the exceptions rather than the rule though. If you can't use LP then use whatever is efficient. We own heaters of pretty much every type and can access far more heaters than a typical PCO could and we still end up using LP heaters most of the time.

    Think about it this way:
    1 30KWH generator (that is a big generator) can supply enough electricity to create 100,000 btu's. The heater in the video clip is 1.2 million btus. You would need 10 generators to equal the output of that one heater! When I size jobs I usually use approx 200,000 btu's / 400 square foot of treatment space.

    Just as education is vital for the general public to combat bed bugs, so is education important in understanding the limitations of any type of treatment. Someone getting into Thermal treatments, regardless of which company they license with or buy equipment from, better understand the nuances of heating and heaters. Be careful when buying heaters or when booking services with suppliers that only have one tool to solve the problem. Most of the time it requires a variety of tools to gat a job done. Thermal Treatment is no different.

    Tony Canevaro

  7. paulaw0919

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 12 2008 14:14:43
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    Thank you for all the very informative information Tony. I am oh so glad I tagged this thread when I posted it.

  8. bitten123

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 12 2008 14:20:45
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    I am so impressed by using thermal heat. I wish that option was available here. I live in a large city (Dallas) and yet there are no bed bug dogs, no thermal heat, only PCO who so far the vast majority are ill informed about bed bugs. Not all, but 2 out of dozens is about all I have found who seemed pretty knowledgable.

    I would gladly go with thermal if it ever comes here.

  9. Bugologist

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Nov 13 2008 8:55:57
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    I can send you contact information to 2-3 people I've spoken and dealt with in the past weeks that personally who would disagree with you on Propane heat being the best way. To say items were damaged would be an understatement.

    That being said, I don't want to be viewed as being against propane heat as I understand it is the best heat "source" when heating a unit. It does provide the most heat quickest but in urban markets, it's simply just not an option.

    I also have concerns about damage as companies I've spoken to claim that they do see hot spots in excess of 160 degrees. Maybe these companies didn't apply it properly or other things happened that I don't understand.

    So again, I'm not against propane powered heat, just have my concerns.

  10. BakedBedBugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Nov 13 2008 10:49:33
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    Bugologist,

    On that point I can agree completely. We have damaged many things when we were new at this. You should never see surface temperatures over 150.

    This boils down to the balancing act were talking about earlier. If you are going to run a gentler heat then the client needs to be out of their home up to 48 hours in some cases. If you are dealing with hotels, that may not be an issue but my experience with residential clients and especially care home or elderly clients is that having them out of the structure even for 8 hours can be quite a burden.
    Define “Urban”. I operate in metro Vancouver, British Columbia. The population of which is over two million people.
    In any case, I am glad to see the technology being adopted more broadly.
    Tony Canevaro


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