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Insect glue board/monitors

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  1. death2allbbs

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 30 2008 8:42:10
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    How important should an insect glue board/monitor be to a PCO?

  2. thebedbugresource

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 30 2008 8:53:33
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    For bed bugs ... not important.

    Rarely do bed bugs get caught in these as they are difficult to place in areas that bed bugs frequent.

    However, it does not hurt to put them out (so I suggest that PCOs do). You may get lucky and catch one here or there that can help alert to a nearby harbourage spot.

    Sincerely,

    Sean
    Entomologist / Pest Professional

  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 30 2008 9:09:28
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    Hi,

    For coackroaches, moths and a few other pests they are extremely important and form part of an integrated approach.

    For Bed Bugs they will only catch something if they are silly enough to walk over them which is not that often. This may change as new traps are developed and hit the market but today they are not effective.

    David

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  4. death2allbbs

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 30 2008 9:47:33
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    Thanks for the feedback, Sean and David. Also, Sean, that's a nice forum that you have.

  5. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 30 2008 10:16:12
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    what and my site is no good...... LOL only joking, its too hot in the office today and I keep getting calls about complex cases. Will someone in a cold climate with bed bugs please send me some weather.

    David

  6. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jul 31 2008 11:48:07
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    Don't under estimate the beneficial aspects of monitor traps placed for bed bugs. While there is nothing to attract them other than lucky/intelligent placement if you are in doubt and happen to catch one, you have proof positive and can take action. On the other hand you may trap a mite, spider beetle, flea, larvae etc. and investigate that. I have seen many cases in which monitor traps were a help. And yes in some cases you can have a problem and never catch anything.

  7. death2allbbs

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Aug 2 2008 9:35:27
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    quote by Wintson O. Buggy:

    "Don't under estimate the beneficial aspects of monitor traps placed for bed bugs. While there is nothing to attract them other than lucky/intelligent placement if you are in doubt and happen to catch one, you have proof positive and can take action."

    death2allbbs: Actually, the "lucky/intelligent placement" by my incompetent PCO wasn't working and I had to catch one that I saw on the wall with a piece of tape.

    quote by Wintson O. Buggy:

    "I have seen many cases in which monitor traps were a help. And yes in some cases you can have a problem and never catch anything."

    death2allbbs: Well that's good to hear, however, based on my own personal experience with my PCO and based on what most of the other people said in this thread, Wintson O. Buggy, it sounds like your experience with glue monitor traps is the exception to the rule.

  8. BugBoy911

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Mar 9 2009 4:23:43
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    thebedbugresource - 7 months ago  » 
    For bed bugs ... not important.
    Rarely do bed bugs get caught in these as they are difficult to place in areas that bed bugs frequent.
    However, it does not hurt to put them out (so I suggest that PCOs do). You may get lucky and catch one here or there that can help alert to a nearby harbourage spot.
    Sincerely,
    Sean
    Entomologist / Pest Professional

    Lucky!?!? I have 4 pictures of at least 3-5 bedbugs caught on montiors placed by me peronsally. There is no luck invovled in using glueboards and monitors. If you have bedbugs within the floors or areas around the bed decent activity, you will catch them. If only I knew how to post pictures on this site I"d prove it to you. If an apartment or room is moderatly infested with bedbugs there is a high percentage you will catch them on a glue board or monitor. I just caught like 6-10 bedbugs on montors last week.. Call me lucky!? Nah... Just the client has bedbugs...

  9. BugBoy911

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Mar 9 2009 4:27:59
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    Whats not effective about glue traps!? I've used ok lets see..... Bannana scented.... Peanut Butter scented.... anise scented.... vanilla scented.... unscented... and caught them on all of these.... Call me lucky LOL... I should play the lotto then!! U people just choose not to use them at all... After a treatment is complete, if there is active bedbug activity around the bed which you missed or what not... you will see how well monitors work.... its not luck at all.... proved it a million times... say what you want... your wrong!

  10. djames1921

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Mar 9 2009 8:39:26
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    This is a great topic. I use them but I do not rely on them. What I mean by that is I definetly trust the positive catches you can get with them and I do not rely on the negative catches. In other words, if I put out monitors and catch bed bugs I believe what I see and the client still has a problem. If I put out monitors and catch nothing, I feel a little better but recommend further monitoring and inspections before I'm ready to declare the infestation eradicated.

    What I do believe in and have had work on many occasions is having the customer sleep in the room with the bed isolated so bed bugs have to crawl over the glue boards to get up the legs of the bed. Care must be taken not to allow blankets to reach the floor and I usually insist the bed is centered in the room to keep it away from walls, etc. Use live bait and see who comes looking for a meal.

  11. paulaw0919

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Mar 9 2009 10:27:30
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    With all due respect about glue boards...a tool in the fight, yes....to depend on them, no way!
    If there is a low infestation, or left over scattered bugs after treatment(s) and a bug is brought to the bed on clothing or by the person unknowingly that bug is now in the bed. It feeds and tucks itself on the bed area, maybe the mattress, box, pillow...something that has no strong residual on it for it comes in contact with the person sleeping in the bed. (this can happen often with families that have feeding infants, and frequently napping toddlers, having to get in/out of bed during the night, imo)
    May I ask, why on earth would that bug (or what are the chances that bug) will climb down off the bed, onto the glue board to go and lay eggs and hide after feeding?
    I was told that by nature they like to stay close to the host. I would think the bug, new nymph or two, would stay close to those areas, not getting in contact with pesticide and then continue to breed? In a case like this, frequently laundering, inspections and proper vigilant treatment follow up are a must. The chances of a bug going on the glue board in a situation as this, imo is slim to none. And what about the few eggs missed in the bed/frame area with pesticide resistance so high now? (I guess that's where proper steam application plays a big roll.) Some professional PCOs please clarify, especially if I need more insight and totally wrong on this.

  12. djames1921

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Mar 9 2009 11:19:05
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    Good post paulaw0919, the method I described earlier involving isolating the bed and having people sleep in the bed with monitors in place on the legs does require the mattress and boxspring being encased and the bed frame being treated thoroughly so that any bed bugs in the bed itself are eliminated. I also recommend/require that all bedding materials be heated treated by dryer or packtite every night before people sleep in the bed. I like this method because the bed itself is small enough that with numerous treatments and vigilence the bed bugs can be eliminated in that area, what can be tough is knowing the status of the outlying bed bugs - those not in the bed or frame. Having a trapping system with live bait gives me those answers - that being said I still want this system set up for at least a month before i start feeling like things are getting better.

  13. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Mar 13 2009 7:59:50
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    Not catching anything on a GB means nothing, catching a booklouse or springtail means that may be what is causing someone to itch and you address moisture issues. If you catch a flea, bird mite or louse you proceed accordingly. If you catch a spider beetle and the person says yeah thats what I saw with no other evidence you congratulate them. If you place GB about and catch a bed bug, you have proof positive as well as a location to start looking further in, not to mention you have one less bb to worry about anf it is an adult female possibly a number of less bbs to worry about. If you catch nothing it means nothing. If you catch a number of bbs on a board you have a great training, ID tool. And these are my reasons for suggesting GBs as part of an integrated control program. Paper ones are my preference.

  14. BugBoy911

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Mar 15 2009 22:03:05
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    Yes it was a good post Paul! Relying on glue boards and monitors is a DEF NO NO!! Using them lets say during an inspection or just for a "state of mind for the client," or just to see if the bedbugs are coming indeed from an area within the walls or an area that wasn't treated as detailed. I"m not saying that glue boards and monitors are a complete necessity in the battle for if I just relied on glue boards I would be fired by now lol! I like to use them as a set of "eyes," I like to say. There my 24 hour watch dog. Just incase a fellow bedbug is within a room or suspected room although the chances of catching the suspect is minimal due to the fact that they like the crevices of raised furniture instead of floors or cracked baseboards as a prime harborage area. There are awsome "roach monitors," that could be used to fold up and stick behind a box spring and other areas around the bed were a regualr glue board couldn't fit, these would be used during inspection only or following a treatment which the client couldn't afford the protect a bed encasements.

    My theory or new theory or just a theory lol... Killa if your around and read this let me know what you think about this. Ok "clear throat," lets look at Ants for a min, when an Ant comes in contact with a pesticide such as Phantom we all clap our hands. Now, if the ant then comes in contact with a glue board after coming in contact with the Phantom, then its a waste. Does the same thing go for bedbugs!? Ok Mrs Jones has bedbugs and after treatment I put out a few glue boards around the bed. Now, 3 bedbugs come out named Moe, Larry, and Curley and cross over the barrier of Phantom for example. They have a harborage within the baseboards cause there are cracks. If a BedBug gets the Phantom on its feet or what not and then goes back to the harborage area, will the bedbug kill his cousins and siblings like ants and roachs!? I"m gona start experimenting with this to find out for I"m not sure but it does make a lot of sense. Its baiting for roach's and then the roach that ate the bait gets stuck on a glue board making the bait useless. I"m not sure if it works the same for bedbugs but I"m sure that if bedbug comes in contact with lets say Phantom on its bedbug feet then crawls next to mommy bedbug and goes to sleep, it will carry the microscopic amount of pesticide to its crevice of choice called home contaminating that area. Glue boards would prevent this tranfer of pesticide resulting in well, more bedbugs. I have not had this specific situation happen to me using glue boards even after a thorough treatment with not finding %98 of harborage within a room or structure. I have gotten to know the Bedbug very very well over time and actually feel comfortable around them to some extent. I know there not some alien bug from venus thats over taking the world, but a small bug that just takes time/technique/education/a lot of practice to kick the living crap out of. Hey, sorry I"m not super to the upmost professional/doctor type who sounds like a robot, for thats what lets my clients connect with me so well. IMO I'd say glue boards are wonderful tools for long term bedbug control and a state of mind.

  15. Bite this

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Mar 17 2009 20:41:10
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    I keep hearing negative feedback on glueboards, but im convinced they were instrumental in getting rid of my bedbug problem. I set them under my bed posts, and caught some everyday,when i didnt see anymore adults, i would see a couple of nymphs (had to look very closely) i left them in place for about 4 months, I haven`t been bitten since around August or September. all I did was make sure the bed was bb free, dusted it with DE and watched my glue strips daily as they tried coming back to the bed each day.

  16. thebedbugresource

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Mar 17 2009 21:49:03
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    I have been privy to seeing the data of a well renowned and respected entomologist that shows bed bugs have an aversion to the glue used on monitors. This person tested every brand of insect monitor and mouse glue board commercially available in the US and his studies showed they were not reliable as a detection method. In addition, he actually observed bed bugs purposefully avoiding the glue altogether. I hope that the data get published and will be available for all to see.

    As stated in my initial response; they are not a reliable detection method but there is no harm in using them as occasionally they will work. I would not however assume that a PCO is not good because they don't use monitors.

    Sincerely,

    Sean
    Entomologist/Pest Professional

  17. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Mar 18 2009 6:28:09
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    Hi,

    I think Sean raises two key issues here, there may be a behavioral resistance to bed bugs entering a glue based monitor or more accurately a trap but the other week I had a detailed and scientific conversation with someone who outlined problems with alert pheromones being produced by bed bugs that are trapped on glue.

    If this is a significant factor then it could potentially result in such devises encouraging the spread of bed bugs through a property as they move to avoid the alarm pheromones.

    It just goes to show that our scientific knowledge of bed bugs continues to grow and grow.

    David


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