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How long does it take to treat an empty apartment?

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  1. fightingthefight

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Apr 13 2019 10:51:07
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    My old next-door neighbour is gone, but his bed bug infestation wasn't completely resolved when he left. The landlord is aware of this. The landlord said he was going to have several weeks with the apartment empty during which time it could be treated properly for bed bugs. However I now have new neighbours moving in barely a week after the landlord sent me an email asking me whether I knew of another pest controller he could hire, because the one he had used wasn't available, meaning of course that he hadn't treated the apartment up to that point. In fact, judging by noises coming from the apartment in the last few days, he actually gave the keys to the new neighbours a few days ago, meaning that he only had a few days to get the bed bug treatment done. Is this enough? Or has he just set up my new neighbours to have a bed bug infestation which will inevitably spill over into my apartment again before too long?

  2. SalsaVince

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Apr 13 2019 11:02:59
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    Treating an empty apartment for bed bugs is difficult because the bed bugs aren't motivated to come out from there hiding places unless there is something to lure them out to feed. It's much more effective if an active monitor can be used with a lure inside which will draw them out and cause them to cross over the residual sprays and dusts. So it might actually be easier to treat with someone inside that apartment but it's definitely not fair for that new tenant if they haven't been warned of the current situation. Have you met them yet? If not, I would knock on the door and play stupid. "Hello, oh sorry I thought you were the Exterminator." Hope they can get it under control before you have any issues. If you haven't already, I would recommend getting some monitors to quickly identify if you do have any activity.

    "If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles."
    Not an expert. Just a survivor who's still learning.
    Vince
  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Apr 13 2019 11:23:39
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    Hi,

    Treating void areas requires completely different methods to occupied ones.

    The landlord needs to see what options are available locally, not every pest controller is willing to work in void locations because the efficiency is often a lot lower and therefore it’s better to occupy even if that means paying people to sleep there.

    I ha e used the new but not yet released “super beacon” from PackTite / PFH Manufacturing but it’s not out on the open market yet. It has the ability to produce CO2 for 90+ days without refilling.

    To better suggest options I would need to see some images of the extent of the infestation.

    I would advise you start active monitoring the area sooner rather than later to reduce the risk of dispersal.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  4. fightingthefight

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Apr 13 2019 12:36:17
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    The problem is that the new neighbours are moving their stuff in right now. It's not my apartment to inspect. From what the old neighbour told me, he wasn't seeing bugs any more, but he was still getting a few bites. The landlord did put some insecticide powder round the apartment after he had gone but, from what I understand, that would not be sufficient. I've written an email to the landlord asking him to clarify the situation.

    I haven't spoken to the new neighbours yet and I am really afraid to. I just don't know what to say. How can I make them feel welcome, but also tell them what they need to know, without scaring them to death? I myself suffer from severe anxiety, and bed bugs are a major trigger for it, so it is very hard for me to keep calm when I am talking about them.

  5. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Apr 13 2019 19:12:15
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    Hi,

    Its a tough situation.

    I have known people to flyer a whole street (including their home) and to do so in the middle of the night to make sure everyone around them was aware of the issue and what steps to take and not to take.

    Its often easier than direct one to one communication.

    David

  6. Mo8414

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Mon Apr 15 2019 20:29:57
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    If I lived in an appartment next to someone with bed bugs first thing I'd do is calk any seam or crack I could find. Second I would drill holes in my walls and fill the void with cimexa since they really do not like crossing that. 3rd I would buy cross fire poison and treat my appartment so there is a residual left for any bug that might make it into my appartment.

    I would have a chat with the appartment manager to see if he had the appartment treated, by who and with what since your appartment is also at risk if the problem isn't resolved. Typically the poisons have a 30 day residual and more than one treatment is recommend.

  7. bugged-cdn

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Apr 16 2019 17:23:39
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    fill the void with cimexa since they really do not like crossing that

    That's misleading. Cimexa should be applied as a very light dusting which the bed bugs will walk on, dry out and die in short order. It's not a repellent.


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