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How do the experts/pros prefer to monitor?

(31 posts)
  1. RNinNYC

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 11 2015 17:06:54
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    Hi pros and experts (and anyone else who cares to weigh in)-

    I hope that this doesn't open a can of worms, but I can't seem to find this information in any specific thread. If it exists, please direct me there and feel free to ignore this. This information seems to be scattered throughout many threads and also has a lot of back-and-forth between the experts (which gets overwhelming to sort through). I was thinking that if I felt this way, others might also and it could be helpful to have it all in one place.

    I know that David Cain advises use of his passive monitor and some of the other experts (especially those in the US) seem to be skeptical of it's cost/benefits (hence the DIY threads). Personally, I have climb-ups and passives, but I'd be interested what you all think is the best indication of "all clear." For someone who wants to monitor their home as a general rule (I appreciate that there are many different situations, so let's say preventatively while people are living there and sleeping in their beds) and are just looking for a way proactively check for peace of mind/early detection, what do you personally advise to your friends/family/clients?

    I appreciate any and all feedback.

  2. bbnewbie123

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 11 2015 17:16:22
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    Or for people who used to have bedbugs and wants to make sure they're gone.

  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 12 2015 7:45:58
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    Hi,

    I think this link answers it from my perspective with time indications:

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/light-complicated-or-delusional-infestation

    From my perspective and actually that of the hotels I work with efficiency is the key criteria. I could provide them with a solution that was 80% as efficient and 40% of the cost and they would not change. This is because that drop in efficiency would mean guest complaints and the cost of those is far greater than the savings.

    If a simpler solution were as effective we would not have seen the need to continue to optimise and develop things as we have.

    As such my recommendation to friends, family and those who ask is to inspect their Passive Monitors once a month and to tag doing so with a good deep clean of the area. It's been working as a solution for people since 2009.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  4. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 12 2015 9:10:36
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    Hmmm . . . interesting question.

    I'll be back . . .

  5. RNinNYC

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 12 2015 10:31:03
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    Thanks , David. Paul- looking forward to your answer. Hoping to hear from some more experts and pros, too!

  6. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 12 2015 18:33:28
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    Bumping. I'd be interested in Lou and Winston's methods for monitoring their homes as well. Effeci's approach appeared to be to open a zoo.

    They
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    = TAOT
  7. bbnewbie123

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 12 2015 19:58:08
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    TAOT, what was effeci's approach?

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 12 2015 20:33:33
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    It's a good question and I am glad to see the thread taking off. I will be happy to excerpt attributed quotes from responses and use them to update/augment the FAQ on bed bug monitors.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  9. RNinNYC

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 6:35:06
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    Glad that other people seem interested in this, too...

    NB- that would be great because I'm sure that this will come up again and again, and you can just point people in the direction of the FAQs. Still eagerly awaiting more responses

  10. ItsJustABug

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 7:06:24
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    theyareoutthere - 12 hours ago  » 
    Bumping. I'd be interested in Lou and Winston's methods for monitoring their homes as well. Effeci's approach appeared to be to open a zoo.

    Ok ,you peaked my interest, a petting zoo? What do you mean Effeci's approach appeared to be to open a zoo.

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 7:11:10
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    Hi IJAB,

    EffeCi is known for his vast collection of pest species which live in his at home insectarium. When I last saw him in Italy I was packed off with the gift of a starter colony of roaches to bring home.

    I guess it just goes to confirm that if you like bugs you "love bugs" as there is little to no middle ground. Its why there are so many colourful characters about.

    David

  12. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 8:39:38
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    theyareoutthere -  » 
    Bumping. I'd be interested in Lou and Winston's methods for monitoring their homes as well. Effeci's approach appeared to be to open a zoo.

    .

    bbnewbie123 -  » 
    TAOT, what was effeci's approach?

    .

    ItsJustABug -  » 
    Ok ,you peaked my interest, a petting zoo? What do you mean Effeci's approach appeared to be to open a zoo.

    Bbnewbie123 and ItsJustABug,

    I’m sure TAOT will be back along to explain, but I think she was just making a joke.

    As David pointed out above EffeCi had/has quite the collection!

    I think TAOT's comment was perhaps, in part, based on this thread:

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/rat-lice-polyplax-spinulosa

  13. ItsJustABug

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 10:49:47
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    Thanks Abs, I figured it was some where along these lines of collection but it did peak interest.
    I can relate to some one with a love for knowledge in a subject to hold such collections.
    In fact I'll be sending Lou some lab type blood collection tubs that I got donated to him for collection containers or what he finds useful.

    One of my grandfathers collected venomous critters for the US military research & anti-venom program when I was a child. I enjoyed the learning experience then the big covered truck roll in
    & roll out leaving empty contains to fill & a check $$. ..
    But learning how he tracked & caught these critters , looking for sign of them & where area they would most likely be found ,give me an appreciation for David's style & mindset on his monitor method. That is one reason I support & used the information he puts out here as well as DDVP from Paul for the sofa & other things.I blended the two to fit my needs & I might add I am bb free and keeping a eye on the future .

  14. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 12:39:01
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    Yep, didn't mean to take it off topic, but I was referring to the fact that EffeCi (where are thou EffeCi) appeared to be getting ready for the next flood.

    Hopefully, the experts will skim through and provide some ideas. I'm especially interested in the entomologists, who may not want to kill their favorite bug if it gets loose in their home.

  15. RNinNYC

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 14:58:37
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    To take it a step further, I'm also curious as to what the pros/experts think about inspecting your own house/apartment post-treatment or as a pre-caution. How often? How thoroughly? (Only when concerned about signs or at certain intervals, etc.) I believe I've seen David Cain said that you should thoroughly examine your bed once a month (I'm assuming this means taking it fully apart and looking with a flashlight) when you clean the frame, but I'm wondering what others think. What about couches/seating areas?

    Thanks in advance!

  16. bbnewbie123

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 15:19:06
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    Yup great questions from RNinNYC!!

  17. player

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 15:48:07
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    Not a pro, but have tried to keep it simple with no need to take the bed apart. I personally find if you over exhaust yourself, you end up worrying yourself more. I know as I went through it, but now use a simple combination using Passive Monitors, Bed Bug Blue, Climb-ups, White Sheets.

    If all clear using above , no worries. Have found the odd black spot on sheets but tested with BBB which gave all clear. Doubted results and worried a bit, but realizing these suspects appeared at different time intervals 10 to 20+ days apart, and have been all cleared by BBB, I didn't worry as much- If it was BBs I'm sure I would have found the evidence by now.

  18. RNinNYC

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 16:47:09
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    Thanks, player- that's exactly what I've been doing, but it's sometimes hard to trust the monitors. Glad to hear it works for you

  19. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 17:03:19
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    In my own home which is free standing I just have a few insect monitors around for general use and keeping tab on my carpet beetles. And I know what to look for if I get bitten. On a more professional level I recommend the use of properly placed Black outs, Climb Ups and a few totally passive insect monitors in difficult housing. When offices claim to have an issue I recommend a NESDCA certified canine team. I have two I prefer and on occasion have them both inspect. Fortunately they are almost always in agreement. I have started to incorporate Active volcanoes in sensitive areas and high value clients but don't really have an opinion at this pint although logically... but then again bed bugs don't always react according to our logic. I was a big fan of the NightWatch when it first came out but quickly lost faith after the recall. As a side note if anyone puts out any type of monitor they will be surprised how many critters we all live with aside from bed bugs.

  20. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 13 2015 18:45:49
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    Thanks Winston!!!

  21. RNinNYC

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 14 2015 6:41:45
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    Thanks Winston. Looking forward to hearing from Paul, KQ, Lou, and anyone else who wants to participate

  22. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 14 2015 7:34:47
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    Hi,

    My personal "ritual" is exactly the same as what I recommend to my clients.

    Once a month I check my monitors as I deep clean my sleeping area. If for no other reason than you bed is the most used item of furniture you own, the stats are that people spend on average 180 hours per month in their beds so 30 minutes once a month to clean and inspect is so sensible.

    The only time I would consider checking and inspecting is if there was a skin reaction of symptoms which would justify me taking that step.

    This is also because that when you factor in bedbug life cycles and how they colonise areas in a "normal" domestic scenario monthly is still an acceptable interval to ensure early eradication through methods such as TbyPMR. It's only in higher turn over locations such as hotels and clinical facilities where we advocate routine weekly inspection because of the added risks rather than an increased efficiency.

    I do not dismantle the whole bed (which would have 3 hours) I focus my bedbug activity on the monitor and while I am cleaning I keep an eye out for any activity that has not found the monitor yet. To date that has never been the case. I would shoot a video of it but frankly I don't feel seeing the inside of my bedroom would add anything to the principles of the process (although in case anyone ever wondered, yes the walls are red).

    I have evaluated the other options and in particular liked the idea of using the SenSci lure in the Passive Monitor but the trials which I can conducted and I know others who have had similar results is that when first opened the sachet is so strong that it actually repels bedbugs. While this may be perfect if you are a treating company wanting to claim the room is clear it is not suitable for purpose as a monitoring device.

    To me the best logic is encapsulated in the Japanese principle of Six Sigma which dictates that a design or process MUST be reworked until it can be made no more simple without any loss in efficacy or results. There are six elements to a Passive Monitor and you take any of them away and it does not function as efficiently. For example remove the tape and you are stuck with a device that can not be installed in the correct places and as such is lower efficiency. The labels we provide on the top are designed to allow record keeping and visual confirmation, this is actually to reduce anxiety by showing that it has been checked and confirmed as clear. Its again part of Six Sigma to make things appear more simple than they actually are and as I explained to someone on the phone the other night we have made our investments because they are needed and anything less always produced less than satisfactory results.

    Hope that makes sense.

    David

  23. RNinNYC

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 14 2015 7:41:32
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    Thanks, David. I realize now that I wrote "taking the bed apart" and that's not what I meant (oops)- Taking apart the frame would be time consuming and difficult for most people. I meant pulling off the mattress to look more carefully at the frame/boxspring/ other parts of the bed, which would mirror what you have in your hotel inspection video.

    Red walls, huh?

  24. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 14 2015 7:59:40
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    LOL, yes its more akin to the hotel inspection video than getting out the hex keys and dismantling a 500 Kg custom made steel four poster bed once a month.

    I like to flip and rotate the mattress once a month which is easy when it's off to clean the base.

    The bathroom used to be Dexster theme complete with blood red walls, splattered shower curtain and bloody foot print bath mat. I have "eclectic" and "specific" tastes.

    David

  25. robinsmom

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 14 2015 15:42:29
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    I used to have them and I had a bed bug beacon which caught nothing at a time I had them for sure. I put David Cains passive monitors in my sofa and on my bed, but if they caught nothing I personally believe it was because my pco sprayed them, possibly on purpose. These pcos charged for their own brand of monitor which was Verifi and I heard it was discontinued due to inability to do what they advertised in other words they did not work.

    I like Lou Sorkins idea to put a light pastel washcloth near where you suspect activity. Since they seem to like sweaty clothes I might stick the cloth in my shoes for a few minutes. Place by a wall or under a sofa and check once a week.

    My workplace had bed bugs badly, and their pco used glue traps with a scent, that caught a few but ahem it was a bad infestation, so bad we didn't need traps to see them.

    Remember to not put them near any sprayed area, some sprays aren't repellents but I dunno I still think you can't be too certain.

    And of course the smartest monitor is your brain/eye combo, it takes guts to look for the little blood suckers but as I figured out, it had to be done. I'm a big fan of using your phone with a selfie stick to look in places you might be afraid to look or can't (if you have a bad back for instance), like the framework of furniture or under a bed. Just make sure to examine the phone after lol or tape up openings before you do this.

    I'm not an expert just a dumb struggling bed bugger like every body else.
  26. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 14 2015 16:06:26
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    RN: Hi pros and experts (and anyone else who cares to weigh in)-
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Not an "expert" or a "pro" (except when I make a grammatical error ), so I guess I'm the "anyone else" type of person.

    How to I monitor for bed bugs? Not so good as I’m told by several pros here.

    I have a four year old harborage-type monitor placed between my futon mattress and the floor (head side) and just touching the wall. I check it once in a while, and occasionally check the corner folds in the futon when I change sheets.

    According to more than one pro, I could not have a worse setup for monitoring and treatment! (I think it was KillerQueen who said in that gentle voice off his "GET OFF THE FLOOR!") lol

    That’s because I don’t have a bed frame, box spring or mattress piping for the bed bugs to harbor in. I actually don’t agree with that opinion, but will not share my thoughts on that here so as not to take this off topic.

    That said, they could very well be right, but for now I prefer the ergonomics and aesthetics of my current sleeping arrangement over a more traditional setup that arguably is easier to monitor and treat if necessary.

    I view my attitude as healthy, and a sign that I have mentally recovered from my bed bug scare several years ago. I don’t tell the bed bugs how to sleep and I'm not going to let them dictate how I sleep!

    This is quite different from my “combat mode” setup four years ago when I felt I was under Cimex attack. Then I slept on a six-leg fold up army cot that could actually be decontaminated inside a heat chamber device.

    Under each of the six legs was a Climb Up Interceptor. The idea here was to reliably eliminate any bugs within the sleeping area (heat treated cot) and then monitor/catch any bugs trying to reach me for their meal.

    Fortunately, I didn’t catch any because it turned out there were none. Don’t necessarily recommend this setup for everyone, but I think it has merit under certain circumstances.

    Richard

  27. RNinNYC

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 15 2015 7:02:06
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    Thanks, Richard and Robinsmom. Robinsmom- That's a creative use of the selfie-stick and I now don't hate it as much as I did due to the tourists whom I nearly mow down walking through Times Square

  28. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 18 2015 16:55:56
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    To some extent it depends what your risk is. In some cases the greater risk is from adjacent units in which case pit fall trap monitors on the floor are a good idea for the early detection against what we refer to as a "volunteer" bed bug.
    For "captive" bed bugs which are those that are carried in on bags, coats and significant others (and perhaps the riskier not so significant others) the introduction may be directly to the bed/couch, ergo floor based pit falls are not going to be your primary early warning. So keep your eyes open and think bed bug safe.

  29. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 18 2015 18:39:02
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    Winston O. Buggy - 5 days ago  » 
    In my own home which is free standing I just have a few insect monitors around for general use and keeping tab on my carpet beetles. And I know what to look for if I get bitten. On a more professional level I recommend the use of properly placed Black outs, Climb Ups and a few totally passive insect monitors in difficult housing.

    Sir Winston,
    Can you say anything more about which "totally passive" monitors you have used?

  30. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 18 2015 19:05:02
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    Nobugsonme - 25 minutes ago  » 

    Winston O. Buggy - 5 days ago  » 
    In my own home which is free standing I just have a few insect monitors around for general use and keeping tab on my carpet beetles. And I know what to look for if I get bitten. On a more professional level I recommend the use of properly placed Black outs, Climb Ups and a few totally passive insect monitors in difficult housing.

    Sir Winston,
    Can you say anything more about which "totally passive" monitors you have used?

    Similar question on which "insect monitors" you use.

    Richard

  31. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 18 2015 23:19:25
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    I use the Catchmaster 288 I for general monitoring. It has a lower level of glue then say rodent/insect multi purpose boards, is covered and has an adhesive underside so they stay where you stick em. While I have never caught a bed bug at home with one I have seen ones from the field with varying numbers of bed bugs and of course other insects. Remember failure to catch does not mean you don't have bed bugs, its a tool and of course I am using it for whatever is out there.


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