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Homemade co2 monitor. Question???

(8 posts)
  1. effinbedbugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Oct 5 2010 11:46:46
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    Has anyone used yeast sugar and water mixture? Read below...I'm considering trying this and placing it in the center of a climbup interceptor to see if my bbs are gone. Advice? Or experience doing this?

    CO2 is produced by yeast fermenting sugar into alcohol, so take a 2-liter soda bottle and fill it with lukewarm water to about 2" from the bottom of where the screw cap would be. Pour the measured water into a bucket and add approximately 2 cups sugar and 1/4 teaspoon baking yeast (e.g. Fleishmann's brand from the baking section of Safeway). Stir until both are dissolved, especially the yeast which is harder to dissolve than the sugar. Pour this stuff back in the bottle and fill to the point it normally would be filled with soda.

    An empty 2 liter soda bottle

    7 cups of lukewarm water

    2 cups of white sugar

    1/4 teaspoon granular bread yeast

    Drill a hole in the center of the top of the cap which is just wide enough to tightly fit a piece of aquarium airline tubing into it, and glue the tubing into place with aquarium silicone sealant. Leave the cap off the bottle to dry for a day. Then screw on the cap and put the other end of the air tube into the intake tube of the filter, so that the CO2 will bubble into the filter. The CO2 may start bubbling the next day, or maybe not for up to 3 days. The bubbles get sucked into the pump propeller and some end up in the filter sponge where they slowly dissolve into the water where the plants can use it for photosynthesis.

    This mixture usually lasts about a month before you have to mix a new batch (more sugar makes it last longer; more yeast makes it bubble faster but it will run out quickly). Watch for when the bubbles are no longer produced, at which time you'll have a nasty alcoholic swill left in the bottle which I don't recommend drinking. Keep the opened yeast packets in the refrigerator in the meantime or the remaining yeast will die

  2. effinbedbugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Oct 5 2010 11:49:44
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    I 4got to mention that this was pulled off the internet for aquariums, so I would obviously not be using the aquarium tube and just releasing the co2 into the air. Would it really last 1 month?

  3. nycyn

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Oct 5 2010 23:34:08
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    Ah! Aquarium tubing! Just threw one in my trash a couple of hours ago, thinking (of course) there might be another use for it. And now I found one.

    Have I gotten to the part how I'm bit of a hoarder yet?

  4. myth buster

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Nov 12 2011 0:49:23
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    I have done this because, as the manager of a large pest control company, I had to find a way to monitor for bed bugs that....

    1.does not cost as much as the Nightwatch monitors ($400+). We own 12 of them and they work well but it is a pain to keep up with filling the CO2 tanks even though I fill my own.
    2. is easy to use and maintain

  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Nov 12 2011 13:30:35
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    myth buster - 12 hours ago  » 
    I have done this because, as the manager of a large pest control company, I had to find a way to monitor for bed bugs that....
    1.does not cost as much as the Nightwatch monitors ($400+). We own 12 of them and they work well but it is a pain to keep up with filling the CO2 tanks even though I fill my own.
    2. is easy to use and maintain

    Myth buster,

    As a manager of a large pest control company, have you heard of the Bed Bug Beacon which costs much, much less than the Nightwatch, and which might be a more reliable and easy to use alternative, if you want something less expensive?

    Also, have you heard of Changlu Wang's plans for the DIY dry ice bed bug monitor?

    I have heard some professionals suggest a PCO should maybe not be implementing the dry ice monitor in clients' homes due to potential dangers.

    That said, I am not sure why you would be using a yeast and water method instead as described above, as I have heard from others that this is not very effective.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  6. BugsMustDie

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Nov 12 2011 16:09:51
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    I think the problem with the above mentioned solution is that there is too much water and not enough yeast. Sure it will last a month, but I don't think the amount of CO2 produced is enough to lure the bugs. Perhaps this is why they found it wasn't effective.

    I experimented with this using my Beacon since I know yeast is part of the solution (you can smell it). I used a half cup sugar to 1 packet of yeast and filled the water to the line (maybe a cup). This produced a lot of CO2 due to the larger amount of yeast used. The problem is the yeast worked so quickly, it ran out of fuel in about a day.
    I'm nearly positive yeast is in the Beacon's solution, but they have added something that increases the amount of time it works. So while it may be more convenient to make this at-home brew, the materials are only slightly cheaper and you have to remix it nightly to ensure it's effective. Also the Beacon may have other additives that attract the bugs. I am not sure of that since obviously they're not going to release what they put in it.
    These observations are based on my own use of the Beacon at home using their solution and then experimenting on my own. I never caught any bugs with theirs or mine, so I can't positively say if either was effective. Although I suspect my bugs were gone by the time I started using it.

  7. myth buster

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Nov 2 2012 23:41:48
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    I can assure you that my mineature fermentor method works extremely well. It works for what I use it for. I use them to test very small areas. Like a 3 or 4 foot area. Not a whole room. 99% of the time I can find them simply by looking for them. They are very easy to find if you know what you are looking for. However, after a treatment, if I suspect that there are still some bed bugs in a crack, I will set a monitor next to the crack. The problem with any monitor is that people expect them to work better than any monitor could ever work. Monitors should never be considered 100% fool proof and they should not be expected to go off like a fire alarm when a bed bug walks in the room. No monitor works that good. You can't put any monitor in the middle of the room and expect to draw bed bugs to it from the other side of the room. In addition, why would a bed bug go to the monitor rather than the human in the room. The reason is because the monitor is closer. You are wasting your time using them to discover bed bugs before they take hold in your home. Monitors should be used after a treatment to check small areas that are questionable and even if you put it right next to a previously infested area and you don't catch anything this does not mean they are gone. However, if you do catch something you know there is more work to do. Thats all. It is nothing more than a tool in the tool box. Any other use would not be recommended.

    I can also tell you that yes, you did put way too much water in it and yes, the Beacon uses sugar and brewing yeast. I know this because I have been brewing beer for 21 years and, I can assure you that the usable CO2 will only last about a week which also happens to be how often a bed bug feeds. If you don't catch anything in a week you are not going to catch anything. You need less water because you need some head space in there to prevent blow off and, you do not need a fish pump. I can also tell you that baking yeast expands too much so you have to use alot less. I have tried it and would not use it. Use brewing yeast. It won't make a mess. I can also tell you that this is my working prototype and we have over 200 of them in use as we do about 80 bed bug treatments a nmonth. That is about 1000 a year and have been doing that for several years and these are mostly in one city. We are not a national company. Few people have as much real world experience with bed bugs as I do. The bottom line is... this product works for what it is intended. It will not work for what you are trying to do. Just go buy some climb-ups and check your bed from time to time.

    You should also stop worrying so much about bed bugs. They are easy to get rid of. It is a myth that bed bugs take over buildings and spread on their own. As long as you don't bug bomb or heat treat a heavy infestation it is unlikely that any surounding units will ever get bed bugs. Humans transport bed bugs and cause them to scatter. Left alone they will never leave a bed where the food comes to them every night. Hell, we don't even find them on the other side of the room that often, let alone on the other side of the building. If bed bugs are wide spread it is because they were niglected or treated improperly and that includes heat treatments in my opinion.

  8. yetanotherone

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon May 27 2013 14:34:51
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    Bumping this old thread because I wondered about this re: heat, which might be what's coming to my situation (and my neighbors). If not heat, then what? Trouble is, adjacent units (a cluster of four AFAIK) have them. And elsewhere in the building one or two as well. Branching, in my speculation, from the original outbreak.

    I can't say I agree that it's a myth that bedbugs don't take over a building, considering I'm watching that happen right now. Old building chock full of bug-sized passageways, to be sure, and the first case was handled very badly by the tenant, and I as of yet have no idea how the subsequent spread was treated. So it got a foothold. And has evidently been creeping outward from there for a couple of years; each affected unit is adjacent to a subsequently-affected unit. The other side of the building has nada, still. Lucky them. Just wait.

    Not a myth. Still disagree?


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