Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Reader questions (do not fit into other categories)

Help! I do not own a packtite, and dryer would ruin my work clothes!

(7 posts)
  1. BedbugsPleaseHateMe

    newbite
    Joined: Aug '14
    Posts: 10

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Sep 17 2014 20:27:37
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The subject pretty much says it all.. I am starting work in an office and most professional attire (including what little I have) can't withstand being treated in a hot dryer. I might have to get a packtite but in the meantime, how horrid an idea is it to handwash clothing, hang it, and inspect it before leaving the house? Please don't be mad at me for asking this. I don't have a lot of cash onhand and need to be able to work.

    This is so deeply beyond annoying, and I am deeply grateful for this forum and website for the support.

    Dear Bedbugs, Please learn to hate me, my neighbors, friends, family, and all of humankind. Love, an itchy, tired human
  2. buggyblue

    member
    Joined: Sep '14
    Posts: 136

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Sep 17 2014 21:15:04
    #



    Login to Send PM

    My understanding is that it's more important to dry the clothes in high heat than to wash. Wash and dry what you can. I have placed all my suits (dry clean only) in the dryer before and had no problems. Or, have you used those Dryel kits? I use them for dry clean only items all the time. You can check the FAQ on landing for time but I think it's 30 min on high heat. Dry clean only clothes can be died, they just can't get wet.

  3. sleepyhead22

    junior member
    Joined: Sep '14
    Posts: 83

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Sep 17 2014 21:17:30
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I don't think just washing them would be enough. I have put tons of dry clean only things in the dryer- if they aren't wet when they go in, the heat doesn't seem to negatively affect them much (aside from them being a little tight at first!). I have a couple clean outfits that I put on right before leaving and then put back in sealed bags as soon as I enter my apartment, that way I can get a couple wears out of the clothes before washing/drying them again.

  4. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,262

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Sep 18 2014 2:40:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yes-- hot dryer alone for a short period (1/2 h for dry clothing) should be fine for most items.

    Note that the home "dry cleaning" kits (where you put items in your own dryer) are made for the same types of materials. You might see what temperature they recommend, I'm not sure. However, I do know lots of people dry clothing on hot and if it starts out dry, it often does fine.

    Obviously there will be exceptions, and there may be something that doesn't make it.

    Dry cleaning (the traditional kind) is known to kill bed bugs, but I wouldn't trust a lot of shops to know how to deal with items to avoid cross-infesting, or most customers to bother disclosing. Note we also don't know if newer "green" dry cleaning methods would kill bed bugs or not.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  5. buggyblue

    member
    Joined: Sep '14
    Posts: 136

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Sep 18 2014 9:08:49
    #



    Login to Send PM

    For the Dryel kits, they recommend you use high heat for 30 min. I think you *can* use lower heat, but it's definitely best to use high heat with the Dryel kit anyway. So it does seem to me that the Dryel would work well with the procedure used for laundering to rid of bed bugs anyway, i.e. highest heat setting for 30 min.

    I think the Dryel sheet just has stuff in it that prevent shrinking. Not sure. It freshens the scent too.

    I've even used Dryel (or just high heat alone) on very delicate items, mostly blouses I wear with suits, and undergarments. The trick is to make sure you do loads with similar materials, i.e. delicate scarves in one load, delicate blouses in one load, suit pants in one load, suit jackets in another load, socks in their own load, etc. By doing loads that consist of the same or similar fabrics, you avoid having rougher fabrics (pants, jackets) damaging more delicate fabrics (socks, scarves, ties). Also, don't place items with zippers/buttons in with very delicate blouses/scarves, to avoid snagging.

    Dryel has been difficult for me to find in stores lately, but you can by in bulk on Amazon and save $ that way.

    Good luck, and I'm sorry you're going through this

  6. buggyblue

    member
    Joined: Sep '14
    Posts: 136

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Sep 18 2014 9:12:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Also, you may already know about this, but store your cleaned items in sealed up bags, like those giant zip-up bags you use for vacuum storage. That's to keep the bugs out while storing them. If an item is wrinkled when you pull it out of the storage bag, you can just iron it before putting it on. My Dryel'd items tend to stay pretty wrinkle free though.

  7. BedbugsPleaseHateMe

    newbite
    Joined: Aug '14
    Posts: 10

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Sep 18 2014 18:57:54
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thank you so much for the helpful advice! I do use the thick zip bags. Fortunately, the dollar store near me sells boxes of 3 for a dollar, and they seal well. The man who runs that store thinks I am a weirdo for constantly buying out his stock. He keeps having to re-order them.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

296,004 posts in 49,869 topics over 154 months by 21,823 of 22,291 members. Latest: Lzrdeyes, bnorth, Nl9045