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having trouble locating an faq regarding couches

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  1. mangycur

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Dec 26 2007 21:52:08
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    I'm thinking of just throwing my couch away. I thought there was an faq about couches but I can't locate it. Can anyone help?

  2. (deleted)

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 27 2007 0:19:40
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    They're notoriously difficult in many cases but with persistence they can be saved. They can be treated underneath the wood frame structure and deep in between and underneath the cushions and they also can be steamed. I don't think you should give up on it until you consult your PCO and see what they say.

  3. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 27 2007 13:41:00
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    Yeah--there's not a specific FAQ on that. It may be mentioned in the FAQs on steaming. Some have used steam, one person with training in hazardous chemicals (Buggedinbrooklyn) used pesticides, but most people get their PCO to treat it repeatedly and assess whether they can keep it.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  4. scaredandstressed

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 27 2007 15:34:25
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    wow I hope mine can be saved I only got it about 3months ago..and am still making payments!

  5. buggedinbrooklyn

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 27 2007 15:58:17
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    to anyone who might have bedbugs in their couch...
    please do not just throw it out as it might help spread the bugs to your niebors home.

    your best bet is to have a PCO treat the couch repeatedly on any exposed areas that you don't sit on. the inside needs to be treated too. every two weeks this needs to happen, and it can take months to be fully rid of them. beds or bedrooms are easyer to treat and exterminate, but chairs and couchs can be done in time.

    if after repeated treatments you find that it is not getting any better, only then should you even think of tossing the item out.
    again, it took at least 4 months of self treatments to my L shaped leather couch to be bug free. while my bedroom was bug free in less then 2 months. couches have to be the hardest thing to treat with all the hidding places, and paths that they can take to reach you.
    don't give up, fight the good fight. you can beat this.

    buggedinbrooklyn

  6. scaredandstressed

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 27 2007 16:07:36
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    thanks..it's post like this that give me hope!

  7. currentinsomniac

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 27 2007 17:11:08
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    Our couch was the first place we found the bugs (and my husband, who was sleeping on it temporarily, was the first to get bit). Our couch has had 5 treatments from the PCO (as well as the rest of our house) and it seems that we've gotten over the worst of it. I was never much the type to actually sit down on a couch and watch tv, etc, so I still don't, but my husband and boy have not noticed any new bites when sitting there. It's true that you don't have to just throw everything out when it comes to furniture. While we will be throwing our couches away (just because of the age and the intricate construction) your furniture pieces can be saved. Just be a little more persistent in the treatment process.

  8. BakedBedBugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 27 2007 18:10:06
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    deleted by Nobugsonme

  9. mangycur

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 27 2007 19:15:26
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    Buggedinbrooklyn: how did you self-treat your leather couch?

    Everyone: does anybody know where to get sofa slipcovers?

  10. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Dec 28 2007 0:59:24
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    mangycur,

    You can get them in places that sell sheets and towels--housegoods stores, Bed Bath and Beyond, or the sheet/towel/comforter section of Macy's.

    BUT... why? A slipcover will not keep them in.

  11. mangycur

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Dec 28 2007 1:06:33
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    Nobugs,

    my cat loves to lounge on the couch, and crawl under the couch and attack my feet from under there. If I have a PCO spray my couch again, it upsets me to think that my cat is going to crawl under the couch and then lick herself. The PCO says the chemicals don't hurt animals once they are dry, but I don't believe it. But if I have them spray the couch and then put a cover on it, at least that's some chemical protection. Right?

    I welcome any comments you have on the matter, should the spirit move you.

    And I'm sorry, I should have looked at bedbathandbeyond before posting the slipcover question. I need to do a little of my own homework instead of asking you all the time! Thanks for all your help, as always!

  12. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2007 3:24:19
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    Ahhh--I did not understand the reason. Sorry!
    I guess that's not a bad idea, mangy.

    Here's a thought: pesticides MUST be dry--completely--to the core, not just on surface--before a cover is put on a sofa or mattress (otherwise mold is a danger--and it's worse than bed bugs.

    I think that the chemicals are safe ONCE DRIED. For you and the cat. But I understand your concern. If you do get slipcover, I'd wash it as often as you do your sheets. Otherwise they can harbor in it, just like anything else.

  13. VictorK

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Jun 12 2008 12:48:01
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    I, too, have a leather l-shaped couch which has become a home for bugs. How safe is a dry (vapor) steamer for treating this kind of furniture? After 4 PCO treatments, the rest of my home seems free of bugs, but they seem to be making their last stand here.

  14. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Jun 13 2008 10:34:49
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    Viktor,

    Did your PCO spray the sofa with pesticides? It takes a lot of work to rid a couch of bed bugs.

    Vapor steam can be a good tool in general, but you need to make sure the steam makes contact with the bed bugs or eggs. If they are deep in the sofa, you won't hit them. A PCO's spray with residual is therefore likely a good idea. Alternatively, your sofa is upside down and you're inside it, steaming every internal surface. (I can't speak to whether the leather might be harmed, but suspect dry steam safer than wet).

  15. Bugless

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Jun 13 2008 14:22:17
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    (Additional comments deleted at author's request.)

    Is a couch necessary at all ?

    Until science develops a better way of dealing with bedbugs, perhaps it would be good to use only simple furniture that can be easily debugged. Plastic furniture with no crevices would be good. The only furniture upholstery would be removable seat cushions that have a BB-proof covering, such as available for pilows. Unlike most plastic lawn furniture, plastic home furniture should be made to be comfortable to sit in!

    Most lawn furniture is regarded as temporary seating. So it is made to sell as cheap as possible, without much concern for comfort.

    The furniture manufacturers are missing good profit opportunities for making good looking, comfortable, BB-resistant, home furniture. It can be given a simulated-wood surface that looks very natural.

    I don't think most home-furniture designers pay enough attention to comfort. They could learn something from the design of pilots' seats in airliners.

    The most comfortable seat I ever sat in was in the jury box when I was on jury duty.

  16. Bugless

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Jun 13 2008 18:53:48
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    Hmm. Jury-box seats may be very comfortable, but I wonder about bedbugs getting on a juror when he sits there in comfort for hours. This applies to the public seats in a courtroom too.

    I didn't get bedbugs when I was a juror. That was several years ago when bedbugs were just something in a children's saying.

    Nowadays, as well as courtrooms, I am leery of public transport, restaurants, airlines, theaters, etc. If things get worse, everyone will be going through a plastic bag routine when they enter or leave their home. There will be a going-out set of clothes solely for wear outside the home and kept in a plastic bag. When a person gets back home, he goes to the bathroom, steps in the bathtub, takes off his clothes and shoes, and puts everything in a plastic bag. Anything that drops off will be flushed down the drain.

  17. Bugless

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Jun 13 2008 19:51:11
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    Yes, I know, the going-out clothes routine is already followed by those who are unfortunate enough to have bedbugs and are responsible people. My point is, we may reach the point where everyone is doing it.

  18. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Jun 14 2008 18:47:18
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    bugless,
    I feel your advice to put DE in the sofa is very bad.
    DE can be a useful substance but should NEVER be inhaled.

    Ever have dust in the cushions of your sofa? What happens when you sit down or even tap the cushions? Answer: airborne clouds of dust. DE is safe if used properly. But applying it where it is bound to become airborne is very bad for your lungs.

    Bugless, I have said before, I know you like to provide speculative solutions, but that's not what this site is about. Please don't suggest things you don't know to be safe and to work.

  19. VictorK

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Jun 16 2008 10:43:04
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    NoBugs,

    PCO did apply some pesticide to the underside of the sofa. I had it split into sections and turned on end so as to expose as much of it as possible. He'll be back this week for one more treatment. My vapor steamer is on order, and should be arriving this week as well. I can steam most of the underside, getting into the cracks and joints in the frame, but I'll have to find a mostly hidden piece of leather to test on before I decide how much of the rest of the sofa I want to treat that way.

    With respect to Bugless's suggestion, I have sprinkled some DE on the hardwood floor under the sofa, but have been cautious about applying too much of it to the sofa itself. The stuff is just the devil to wipe up, and it's very visible on dark brown leather.

    Is a sofa really necessary?? In my one-bedroom condominium, it's only place sit other than the throne room, and there's no TV there... My worst case scenario last resort will be to wrap the sofa in plastic and put it in self storage for 12 to 18 months to starve the pests out. I can use some throw-away IKEA chairs in the meantime.

  20. Bugless

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Jun 16 2008 10:51:04
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    Excellent point, NoBugs. Please remove my post about dusting couches with DE.

  21. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Jun 16 2008 15:53:29
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    Thanks, Bugless.

    ViktorK, pesticide sprays applied to the couch are fine if your PCO applies them. I was only referring to DE which, as a dust, would not be good in the sofa.

    Steam can be very effective, but I would consult with your PCO about where you will be steaming. Remember that if the PCO put down a residual pesticide (ie one which hangs around), you don't want to "clean it away" with steam or other methods.

  22. Adele

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Jun 16 2008 19:34:07
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    by the way NoBugs - In my ignorance (not knowing anything about this site) I tried the DE powder on my sofa for weeks and it did not work so your assessment of that advice is right- it is not a viable way to treat sofas

    just my 2 cents since you've already agreed to it - but I attest to that method's ineffectiveness

    Adele

  23. MixedFeelings

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Jun 16 2008 19:46:16
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    Hi there,

    I have just started dusting my couch. Prior to the dusting, I did multiple rounds of dry-steaming and applying a pesticide residual spray.

    I am now dusting under the couch (turn it over, remove cover and apply a thin coat with a rose duster), the cracks on the rest of the couch, and under and between cushions. But not on surfaces where people touch (such as the upper seat cushions, backrests or arms). I've also covered the whole thing with a large sheet. This is to protect us from touching any dust, and to contain any dust that may be disturbed by movement. My theory is that the BBs in there will need to touch at least some dust to get up onto the sheet to bite us.

    It's early, but so far the bites have seem to be reduced. I also found my first possible BB-carcass... under the couch after I dusted! Wooo! (Although I cannot say it is BB for sure, it's squished, might be a spider.)

    Just my two cents of personal experience.

    MF

  24. heartattackhelpme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Jun 16 2008 22:32:45
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    Hi
    I have a couch that has been treated three times chemically and once with thermal heat.
    I just bought this couch and love it. It is only 3 months old.
    I was bit again....anyhow...I think that my son maybe carrying them to his Father's and back again.
    I have just insisted that his father have a dog inspection. He has not agreed to it and thinks that I am ridiculous.
    However, I do not know what else to do right now. All I can do is encourage him before the nexgt treatment.
    What if I through out the couch and they come back?
    That is the issue isn't it?
    I wish there was an encasement to put on the couch right after spraying to ensure that they never come back.
    This is one of the most misunderstood problems that I have ever encountered. There is no education unless your search and share.
    My heart races all of the time.
    I am quite worried that I may have a stroke.

  25. Adele

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Jun 16 2008 23:00:52
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    Dear Heartattack... you know I am not any sort of an expert - and I have my moments ranting and raving and can certainly relate to the stress and anxiety of these miserable things

    but Truly - sometimes it is worth a moment to take a deep breath and not get so upset or anxious - and yes I have been there and can relate

    Please don't make yourself sick over this

    If you think your son may be spreading them from his Father's house then when he comes back from visiting his father you can take all kinds of precautions to prevent him from further spreading them into your home

    God bless you

  26. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Jun 17 2008 0:25:51
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    MixedFeelings,
    I would be concerned that dust applied between cushions and under cushions might be inhaled. It can be bad for your lungs. (I am not concerned with you putting it in static areas under the couch, on the floor under couch, etc.)

    Adele, DE can work, but bed bugs must cross it to die and it will take 10 days (we're told) to kill them. If you put it down 2 weeks ago, it may be too early to call it a failure. I don't think it's good as a sole method either, but it can help (just not in a sofa's cushions!)

  27. Adele

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Jun 23 2008 19:33:00
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    nobugs - for the record - i tried the DE for 6 weeks with no success

    anyway the sofa is gone

    Adele


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