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Good Bed - Low Cost - PERFECT for Banishing BB @ IKEA - Tolga Bed Frame

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  1. banishbb

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Wed Oct 27 2010 17:17:52
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    I am a devout WICCA pagan - and an Earth Mother who LOVES all insect's - in fact I call them the same name as the Indigenous People of North America - they are the "Creepy-Crawlies" and that is a fond, affection name for insects. Native People in North America call humans "Two Leggeds" and animals are the "Four Leggeds" and bugs are the "CREepy-Crawlies" and that is with affection.

    I view insects as highly valuable - without wild honey bees humans would have NO food crops. Many useful insects eat predatory bugs which destroy human food crops. I love ladybugs, butterflies, wasps, bees, dragonflies. I find insects fascinating. They are among the OLDEST, smartest and most highly adaptable organisms on earth.

    I do not think humans are more important than insects. Termites, ants, bees - they are true good hearted little Communists who live ONLY to support their colony and they are selfless in their devotion and love for their colony. Long may the insects reign on earth!

    However, when it comes to BB - those friggin' little freeloaders are VAMPIRE BUGS and have no place in the world for me. If I could smote every frickin' BB from the face of the earth I would do it gladly. I am an Animal Rights Activits - a pacifist, a vegan and love all of the creatures on the earth and beyond....however the psychic trauma - the $1,4000 expense of moving to a new home - the beautiful treasures I had to THROW OUT which were infested with BB shit - it nearly drove me to a nervous breakdown with 10 month SERIOUS infestation.

    I moved to a brand new home and was meticulously careful what I packed and how I packed to bring my stuff to my new place. I stored ALL of my possessions in a garage which is about 10 feet from my new house. For 6 weeks I did not unpack ANYTHING nor bring ANYTHING from my old infested house into my new house - it was in the hope it would help lure those creepy little creatures OUT of my stuff. I thought if there was no human blood to feast on - no scent of Carbon Dioxide breathing from a human - no 98.6 degree body temperature to sense - that the little f*@#!ckwits would leave my garage and walk out of the boxes they were living on - I stored ALL my stuff for 6 weeks - before I dared move it back into my home.

    I saw a LOT of dead BB in the stored - isolated place where my boxes were stored. I did see a few, minute tiny nymph bugs near the concrete close to the garage. That was a CLUE there were EGGS HATCHING IN THE GARAGE. So I kept ALL my stuff in the garage and would not bring it into my new house - who needs that grief? Once BB invade your home - if just ONE pregnant BB walks into your house -she is bringing her family - brother and sister BB will mate with each other - they don't care. There is no "incest" among insects.

    For about one month, I did not see ANY infestation in my new home - but after about 6 weeks I did see very very MINOR amounts of BB in my home. It was random, isolated BB on my sleeping area. I started washing ALL my bedding, blankets, sheets, Body Pillow Pallet, pillows EVERY DAY in the hottest setting of washer/dryer.

    I sprinkled the entire perimeter of my new home - doors, windows, etc with tons of diatomaceous earth. Plus INSIDE my house I sprinkled loads of Diatomaceous earth - especially near my sleeping area.

    I did not bring a bed into the house - instead I sleep on the floor with a huge jumbo size Body Pillow and a lot of comforters to make a makeshift pallet. I had to toss out my $1,000 mattress, box springs and lovely $400 cast iron 4 poster "Princess" bed frame because it was totally infested beyond salvation.

    I am not bringing a bed into my new home - until I am BB free.

    I saw the IKEA catalog - they have a really GOOD bedframe that is 100% stainless steel and it is cheap. If you coat that bed frame with Petroluem Jelly - perhaps the BB's cannot climb up it? It has a pine wood slat portion which is what your mattress goes on top of. BB just LOVE to nest on that kind of thing and I would thoroughly COAT THE ENTIRE THING IN petroluem jelly and diatomaceous earth. Plus I would take a coffee cup plate and coat it in diatomaceous earth and petroleum jelly and put that under ALL 4 corners of the bed feet to prevent the little monsters from climbing up onto your bed.

    I read many places 90% of BB like to live, breed, nest and huddle up within 10 to 13 feet of the sleeping area of humans. So be MOST VIGILANT about that area and totally spread diatomaceous earth all over your bedroom in heavily dusted manner. Petroleum jelly is great to put at the entrances and exits of your bedroom and also line the windows with it - then dust it heavily with diatomaceous earth - the BB cannot crawl past the P-Jelly and get STUCK -ooooooh, it gives me trembling orgasmic bliss to see dead BB and I love to watch them die - OK I admit it - I HATE THEM WITH ALL MY PASSION.

    Diatomaceous Earth makes their exoskeleton BURST and explode and they die a horrible death. Ain't it grand?

    I haven't yet bought this bed - because I am waiting for my house to appear completely BB free for at least 4 months before I invest in a new bed - but this looks PERFECT.

    IKEA can buy online (delivery is really expensive) maybe better to go in person to their store

    TOLGA TWIN BED FRAME $40 each - BUY TWO AND PUT NEXT TO EACH OTHER FOR A FULL SIZE or QUEEN SIZE BED 701.222.15. It has a cheesy very thin mattress that goes with it - but perhaps a CHEAP and disposable mattress is OK if you are experimenting and trying to get rid of BB?

    SULTAN FLORVAG twin foam mattress $99 washable polyester cotton cover - polyuerethane foam and polyester wadding only 3 1/8th inch thick - doesn't look comfortable - but it is CHEAP and good for an interim bed while in the midst of infestation. 001.397.52

    They only sell it in TWIN size - but if you put TWO together it will make a full or queen size bed. You can get those "adaptors" which go in the middle between 2 twin beds to make it stay together - then put your mattress on top of it. I've seen them at Bed, Bath & Beyond and also on Amazom.com It is like a very stiff piece of foam latex that is inserted between 2 twin beds.

    I also bought a Full/Queen sized mattress encasement system from Protect-A-Bed.com They are low cost and VERY well made. They won't rip and tear like so many of the cheap mattress covers. It is totally designed with screwing the BB and making them leave - it protects your mattress completely and the BB cannot crawl inside the mattress encasement and destroy your mattress.

    Keep Hope Alive and Don't Have a Nervous Breakdown!

    banishbb

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Oct 28 2010 3:02:52
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    Hi banishbb,

    You posted the same message on several other threads, and those posts have been deleted. If you want to refer people to this post, you can link to it. Please do not post the same thing over and over -- it's considered spam.

    Since most people open a number of new threads which appear at once, they are opening threads and discovering the same post over and over -- it can be annoying and time consuming.

    Thank you!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Oct 28 2010 5:33:24
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    Hi,

    Sorry to burst your bubble but this type of bed is exactly the type I don't recommend.

    If you attempt to create a living environment where bedbugs cant access the sleeping area your force them into more remote and harder to treat locations.

    There have also been many debates on the use of petroleum jelly as an isolation aid and again its not recommended by professionals for the same reasons.

    I appreciate that this may have worked for you but to extrapolate that back to a solution for everyone is a broad claim at best.

    The harsh reality is that when you come into contact with bedbugs away from your home they have no way of knowing what type of bed you have and therefore giving people a false sense of security based on the type of bed they have is just plain silly.

    I* hope this clearly explains why this is NOT a good idea.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  4. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Oct 28 2010 6:36:41
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    David: If you attempt to create a living environment where bedbugs cant access the sleeping area your force them into more remote and harder to treat locations.
    ------------------------
    It took me awhile to grasp this concept, but once understood many things fell into place and made it easier to devise strategies for fighting these bugs.

    That said, let's say for example you are not sure you have bed bugs, i.e. inconclusive evidence such as bites and blood stains but no specimens, fecal stains, cast skins. And let's forgot the isolation technique used by the original poster, as it's a bit complicated.

    So say you started with a "clean" bed and bedding (in my case I used a cot that could fit into a PakTite unit). And then you used something like ClimbUps, effectively isolating the sleeping surface/feeding zone.

    Wouldn't such a setup be one strategy for *detecting* bed bugs one way or another. Then once they were detected (or not detected after "x" days) you would either treat (if bug evidence was found) or go back to more normal sleeping arrangements and use something like your BB Alert Passive to monitor for any future infestations.

    In other words, while isolation techniques can potentially spread an infestation like you say, they can also be useful for detection if used for a very short period of time, i.e. until the first bug is caught.

    Just want to make sure I have this right.

    Richard

  5. spideyjg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Oct 28 2010 8:44:26
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    So be MOST VIGILANT about that area and totally spread diatomaceous earth all over your bedroom in heavily dusted manner.

    Another really bad idea. You have to harm the bugs but not yourself.

    Jim

  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Oct 28 2010 11:13:14
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    Hi Richard,

    I appreciate the logic that this appears to be but the reality is that it does not stand up in the field.

    I have made observations in properties with just about all possible types of isolation from homemade to commercial traps and drew my conclusions after finding too many cases where isolation simply gives a temporary relief until the bedbugs find a way around it or move around the property.

    Isolation devices are often miss sold as monitors when they are in fact traps. If its designed to entrap the bedbug its a trap - simple.

    I designed the passive system to be a true monitor which shows the signs of bedbug activity in the area without trapping them because of the risk of alarm pheromone release and localised scattering. The reality is that the aim of the exercise is to detect either:

    • Live samples
    • Cast skins
    • Faecal traces

    Once these are confirmed then you have the evidence to justify treatment.

    I will happily stack my 17,000+ case experience and observations up against the academics on this one because I have enough experience to know I am right. You will also find posts of mine dating back years explaining this but for some reason many of the other "experts" don't want to listen.

    David

  7. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Oct 28 2010 20:11:24
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    David: isolation devices are often miss sold as monitors when they are in fact traps. If its designed to entrap the bedbug its a trap - simple.
    ________________________________________

    Not disputing the superiority of passive monitors in the long term such as your BB Alert Passive. In fact, I'm currently one as an early warning device.

    My point was not that so-called passive monitors (like ClimbUps) are superior, but that they could serve a limited function to "trap" a bed bug (as you seem to suggest above), and the act of trapping the bed bug would then give confirmation to the homeowner of a bed bug infestation in a situation where there were previously only inconclusive signs.

    In other words -- putting aside the concept of "scattering" for a moment -- do you agree or not agree that a device like ClimbUps could at least be initially useful in identifying an infestation. Or, if you don't believe so, why wouldn't ClimbUps at least initially trap one or two bed bugs before the alarm pheromones kicked in?

    Richard

  8. BBcoukHome

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 4:43:14
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    Hi Richard,

    You cant set aside the communication method of insects i.e. pheromones for a second because bedbugs wont. When they are stressed they produce an alarm pheromone to signal the others of the danger, they cant turn this off so you cant set it aside, even for the sake of the argument if they cant turn it off you cant discount it.

    The main point is about isolation regardless of the mechanism used the effect is the same. If you allow bedbugs to freely move around they will settle within 3 - 4 feet of the sleeping area. If you isolate with tapes or traps then they cant do that.

    If you provide them with a model refugia they will move into it where they can not only be easily detected they can also be removed along with the device. This is basically what we have been doing with a hotel for the last 18 months in London and it has reduced not only the levels of infestations but also the time it takes to clear them.

    There is a world of difference between theory and field based knowledge with bedbugs. It may seem logical but out in the real world it does not always work that way.

    Regular readers will appreciate that I have certain issues that I stick to and this is just one of them. I don't isolate, I don't encase and I don't caulk. It works for me and my team and the 12 cases we treat each day.

    I hope that explains, if not feel free to email me.

    David

  9. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 8:31:14
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    I don't isolate, I don't encase and I don't caulk.

    Idem

  10. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 9:07:06
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    David: I don't isolate, I don't encase and I don't caulk.
    Effi: Idem
    -------------
    Putting the issue of isolation aside for the moment...

    I like the logic of creating an artificial refugia such as the BBAlert Passive (BP) (no alarm pheromone, no scattering), but wouldn't encasing the bed actually *help* BP to work, as opposed to hindering it, at least in the specific case of detecting a new infestation? For discussion's sake, I'm going to define "new infestation" as a scenario where there were no bed bugs present prior to the placement of BP.

    I say this because to quote David, "If you allow bedbugs to freely move around they will settle within 3 - 4 feet of the sleeping area." So assuming this, wouldn't an un-encased bed then at least partially compete with the BP as a refugia spot? In other words, by encasing the bed, I would think that the bed bugs would be even more likely to migrate to the BP and then be detected.

    But maybe I read you wrong. Are you against encassing a mattress with no reasonably known bed bug activity (for example a new mattress) or just against encassing a mattress with known or suspected bed bug activity? Because in the latter case, I could see a potential scattering of the bed bug population as alarm pheromones could kick in because of the encassing process.

    Richard

  11. BBcoukHome

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 13:05:01
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    Richard,

    I put it another way why encase when you don't need to?

    I am also about education, awareness and early detection. This is to help understand, avoid and deal with quickly while the issue has not spread through the rest of the property.

    Think of it as the ultimate in Zen pest control. It costs very little to do but there is a lot of resistance put in place with modern western thinking.

    OK I am off out to meditate on that one.

    David

  12. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 13:20:01
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    Think of it as the ultimate in Zen pest control.
    ------------------------------
    OM K

  13. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 13:20:36
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    FWIW, I have encased my mattress with a not totally high end encasement. I did so to make it easier to inspect the mattress and to make the mattress easier to flip and move.

    (since none of you have ever seen me in person, you don't know that I'm really short. I also live alone. Hauling the mattress around to inspect is hard work for me.)

    Mostly I encased because I thought that it would be a good idea re: dust mites. I have allergies. I left the pillows encased for the same reason.

    I also have a cat; encasements and cats do not mix well. I'm not willing or able to bar her from the bedroom (her little box is in the bathroom which is only accessible through the bedroom . . . and since I live in a one bedroom, one bath apartment, the only places to relocate the box to would be the kitchen or the living room--not palatable to me.).

    I'm not against encasements unilaterally. I just think that people engage in some magical thinking regarding them--that putting one on a bed will absolutely prevent an infestation. For example, people who don't have control over their PCO choice (like renters like me) who want to avoid unnecessary exposure to pesticides might find them an attractive option in advance of an infestation, but I do think that that kind of use is most likely to be most effective if employed in concert with a passive monitor so as to keep the bugs close to the bed.

    People with high anxiety levels who have trouble sleeping knowing that the bugs are going to come feed on them absolutely can employ them as part of a protect the bed strategy.

    But I don't think they're necessary in every case, and since the good ones are so expensive, I hate to see people act as if they are a vital part of every treatment program. (ETA: BTW, I don't think Richard is saying that they are vital. I do think sometimes the posts about encasements can come off that way.)

  14. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 15:20:48
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    I guess that, more than Zen, it's Ai Ki Do... using their forces to eradicate them...:-)

  15. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 15:43:19
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    SOCAL: I don't think Richard is saying that they are vital. I do think sometimes the posts about encasements can come off that way.)
    ----------
    Dear Zen, Ai Ki Do and Cat Masters,

    Yes, I'm not saying encasement's are vital, just trying to increase my knowledge base, which in the end is the most useful tool any of us can have regarding these bugs.

    That said, given that I *already* encased my futon mattress, I don't think anyone would argue (Zen and Ai Ki Do Masters included) that it's best to leave the encasement on for the requisite 18 months or so in the event I trapped some live bugs in there. I doubt that I did, but the possibility does exist.

    OMver and out,

    Richard

  16. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 16:06:35
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    When I finish to treat a mattress with superheated dry steam, there are no more live BBs (eggs, numphs or adults) in it...
    A mattress needs a litlle more than 5 minutes to be steamed.

  17. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 16:14:25
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    Effi: When I finish to treat a mattress with superheated dry steam, there are no more live BBs (eggs, numphs or adults) in it...A mattress needs a litlle more than 5 minutes to be steamed.
    --------
    I was under the impression that steam could only penetrate so far into a mattress, but then again I've been under many wrong impressions on this trip into bug satori.

    When you say "superheated dry steam" -- I currently have a Vapamore . Not a pro unit, but respectable enough as long as you duck when the attachments come flying off. Do you think such a unit would penetrate a mostly cotton, 4-6 inch(polyester encased) futon mattress and kill any possible eggs, nymphs or adults?

    Richard

  18. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 16:21:14
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    Do you think such a unit would penetrate a mostly cotton, 4-6 inch(polyester encased) futon mattress and kill any possible eggs, nymphs or adults?

    Why (and in what way) should BBs go and harbour so deepen in a mattress?

  19. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 16:26:19
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    EffeCi,

    It's OK the European bedbugs have not yet adapted and perfected the art of chew into mattresses as well as sufferers pockets.

    Bed bugs never live inside a mattress unless they are ripped and they have exhausted all other possible refugia.

    Like you I am yet to be convinced by the roll of encasement over good quality workmanship although several people in Chicago tried to convince me that I was missing out on a great profit margin opportunity. Sorry boys I would rather keep my ethics and loose out on 20 pieces of silver.

    David

  20. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 16:31:51
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    Sorry boys I would rather keep my ethics and loose out on 20 pieces of silver.

    Thanks, David, I feel less alone, now....

  21. so unsettling

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 17:51:38
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    Well gee David, that makes sense. I should pick up all those climb ups and save for a later time to test reinfestation. I didn't mean to be isolating the bed. The mattress is not yet encased.

    One thing about the passive monitor you designed. I have one. But I haven't figure out where I can use it. My bed doesn't have a headboard--it's just mattress, box spring, and the base. I didn't realize when I bought it, that it works best on headboards? Or that that is the most practical place to use it? My bed is pulled from the walls, and just sort of floating there in the middle of the room. Not sure where to use it.

  22. so unsettling

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 17:55:04
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    Oh, and also David, I was using the climbups primarily to see if they had spread into my living room. Under the couch, the piano bench, and a table. Have drawn blanks after a week.

  23. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 18:07:44
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    Under the couch, the piano bench, and a table. Have drawn blanks after a week.

    That's because you didn't sleep on them all the night....

  24. so unsettling

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 18:23:12
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    No, but i sit on my piano bench as often as I sleep in that bed. I have often thought that I am being bitten by the piano and computer, which are right next to each other and where I am right now. Do they only get hungry when we are asleep? I start work very early in the morning, get up by 4 am, and park my butt right here for a few hours. There is no reason to think they didn't find me here:)

  25. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 18:35:40
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    ah, ok... just wondering why you decided to monitor the piano... now I know and it has sense.
    Thanks

  26. The Reluctant Entomologist

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 18:58:37
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    bed-bugscouk - 1 day ago  » Isolation devices are often miss sold as monitors when they are in fact traps. If its designed to entrap the bedbug its a trap - simple.
    I designed the passive system to be a true monitor which shows the signs of bedbug activity in the area without trapping them because of the risk of alarm pheromone release and localised scattering.

    So, this is being said in reference to Climbups, no? I'm not sure if I completely get it. Does this mean, then, that if/when a bug does get trapped, that bug will set off alarm pheromones? (As in an involuntary sort of "Oh, crap! Help! I'm stuck!")? And also, perhaps, if someone improperly maintains them by, say, dumping a load of DE in them (since that might make the bb instincutally
    "think" -- in its bug-like way, that is -- "Whoa! Giant pile of broken glass suspiciously set up as a roadblock between us and food! Run, everyone! It's a trap!" ???

    I guess what I'm asking is, assuming the Climbups aren't improperly set up and never catch anything, what's the worry exactly (or is there a worry)? Are you saying that the simple presence of plastic and a really thin layer of talc makes bbs release the alarm pheromone? And if so, why would that be? I don't get it.

    After all, I thought that the point of Climbups was just to find out whether they're coming toward or away from the bed -- if they are present. If you find out they ARE present, you immediately stop using them and bring in the big guns, right?

    Could you please clarify this part?

  27. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 20:29:02
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    (David) Does this mean, then, that if/when a bug does get trapped (in a ClimbUp), that bug will set off alarm pheromones? (As in an involuntary sort of "Oh, crap! Help! I'm stuck!"
    ------------------------------------------
    Same question with regards to a mattress encasement. Do you think that trapped (encased) bugs can set off alarm pheromones which could potentially spread the infestation?

  28. bug-tired

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Oct 29 2010 20:34:27
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    All of a sudden I have this terrible feeling that I've been doing everything completely wrong!

  29. Sleepless in NYC

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 30 2010 0:36:04
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    Richard56 - 4 hours ago  » 
    (David) Does this mean, then, that if/when a bug does get trapped (in a ClimbUp), that bug will set off alarm pheromones? (As in an involuntary sort of "Oh, crap! Help! I'm stuck!"
    ------------------------------------------
    Same question with regards to a mattress encasement. Do you think that trapped (encased) bugs can set off alarm pheromones which could potentially spread the infestation?

    Richard,
    Are you nervous about isolating your bed and encasing your futon?

  30. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 30 2010 8:34:27
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    The question you quote about isolating the bed was not mine (read up four posts) but belongs to the "Reluctant Entomologist". I do not isolate my bed. My question was about mattress encasement and alarm pheromones -- specifically if an encased bed bug could send out alarm pheromones that would potentially spread an infestation, in the same way that trapped bed bugs can in isolation devices like ClimbUps per David's posts.

  31. Sleepless in NYC

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 30 2010 9:38:59
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    I see. I know you didn't ask the original question, but I saw your consequent posts...Well, good that you're not nervous or worried.

  32. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 30 2010 9:48:30
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    My question was about mattress encasement and alarm pheromones -- specifically if an encased bed bug could send out alarm pheromones that would potentially spread an infestation, in the same way that trapped bed bugs can in isolation devices like ClimbUps per David's posts.

    I suppose that those are not "alarm" but just "problematic" situations for BBs, so they don't release alarm pheromones.
    Insects do not think: they're nothing more then sophisticated organic robots, with a very good firmware. They simply can't understand that an incasement it's a sort of attack against them.

  33. The Reluctant Entomologist

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 30 2010 10:14:59
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    1. But they really do release the alarm pheromones when they can't get out of the Climbups? Or they dont'?

    2. No one's saying, are they, that they are "alarmed" by the mere presence of empty Climbups, are they? Or that they'll avoid the bed and go elsewhere just bc they're there?

    That's all I'm trying to understand.

  34. EffeCi

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 30 2010 10:21:04
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    1 - in my opinion, no
    2 - not at all (read my post above)

  35. The Reluctant Entomologist

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 30 2010 10:27:48
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    Thanks for your quick reply, Effeci!

    I'm among those who don't believe that "isolating" is a good idea (since they'll just go elsewhere in the building, looking for food). So I just wanted to make sure using Climbups wasn't a form of isolating.

    Anyway, I figure that the minute something turns up in my Climbups after all of these months, the bbs can do whatever they want -- bc that's when I just give up!

  36. Sleepless in NYC

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 30 2010 11:37:22
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    That's my rock star Franco. Always there when you need him. Muwah!!!!!

  37. Richard56

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Nov 5 2010 19:08:50
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    buggyinsocal: I don't think Richard is saying that they are vital. I do think sometimes the posts about encasements can come off that way.)
    ----------------------------------
    Agreed. Just trying to probe the experts here as to their possible pluses and minuses. As one expert suggested earlier in the thread, encasement's are among other things a "profit margin opportunity" for some PCO's, and profit opportunities will be promoted. On the other hand, as "buggyinsocal" states, encasements can make inspection easier, especially in conjunction with the use of passive monitors which in theory would become the preferred harborage over the encassed mattress. Assuming of course, that the encased bed bugs do not send out alarm pheromone's which doesn't seem to be the case.

    Richard


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