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Gaseous Clorine Dioxide (CIO2)

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  1. bait

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Apr 22 2012 23:10:58
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    No real time to post or comment, just alerting those who might be interested in a six-month old study designed to investigate the efficacy of gaseous clorine dioxide in killing bed bugs. Should you wish to read about this experiment, go to

    http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.1086/665320?uid=2129&uid=3739832&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4&uid=3739256&sid=56074163173

    You'll have to pay to read the whole thing, but the preview is substantial if not substantive. There may be other articles, press releases, etc., but I didn't look beyond JStor.

    Bait

  2. TXbedbugger

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jul 26 2012 10:28:54
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    Gaseous chlorine dioxide as an... [Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI http://goo.gl/26fbE

    RESULTS:
    Concentrations of 1,086 and 724 ppm of ClO(2) yielded 100% bedbug mortality assessed immediately after exposure. Live young were not observed for any eggs exposed to ClO(2) gas. ClO(2) at a concentration of 362 ppm for 1,029 parts per million hours (ppm-hours) achieved 100% mortality 6 hours after exposure. A ClO(2) concentration of 362 ppm for 519 ppm-hours had 100% mortality 18 hours after exposure. Up to a 6-log reduction in B. atropheus spores was achieved using similar concentrations of ClO(2) in a hospital room, indicating that the concentrations needed to kill bedbugs can be achieved throughout a hospital room.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    ClO(2) is effective at killing bedbugs in the laboratory, and similar concentrations of ClO(2) gas can be achieved in a hospital room. ClO(2) can be removed from the room without residuals.

    On the Wikipedia article about Chlorine Dioxide it says that:

    It can also be used for air disinfection,[20] and was the principal agent used in the decontamination of buildings in the United States after the 2001 anthrax attacks.[21] After the disaster of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana and the surrounding Gulf Coast, chlorine dioxide has been used to eradicate dangerous mold from houses inundated by the flood-water.[22]

    Do you think it will ever be used for application in residences?

  3. Koebner

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jul 26 2012 11:17:09
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    In vitro isn't in vivo.
    Something can be toxic as hell to BBs but reliably getting it to the BBs is a sometimes insurmountable hurdle in the field.

    A treatment like this looks to me like it's only ever going to be domestically viable where a structure can be fully treated & tented. Sure, seal a hospital room & flood it with the gas - sounds super. What happens once you unseal the aircon & other ducting, electrical wall sockets, etc? Has all equipment that may have been in the room (carts, wheelchairs, gurneys, etc) been thoroughly checked, &, where needed, fully treated? Are any personnel affected & what is their risk of reintroducing BBs? Do we start firing trained medical personnel because they have a recalcitrant BB problem at home? And so on.

    There are no magic bullets & there never will be - it's ain't what you do; it's the way that you do it. We already have a variety of effective treatments - the problem is we have so few effective PCOs.

  4. AshamedandScratching

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jul 26 2012 11:23:17
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    OTOH, is this cheaper than vikane? Is it more readily available?

    In the US, the affordability of treatments is an issue. More multi-unit structures might choose a process like tenting the building and treating the entire structure if the costs associated were competitive to multiple treatments by a PCO.

    In Canada, where vikane is unavailable, this could be a huge boon. If this is legally available, it might allow that type of treatment to become readily available.

    There will never be enough tools, and there are certainly not enough skilled PCOs.

  5. TXbedbugger

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jul 26 2012 11:45:05
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    Here is a news report on YouTube about a high school using Chlorine Dioxide to sanitize a locker room. They use it while it is occupied by releasing it in controlled amounts through the air system for 30 days. I have no idea if the levels needed to kill bed bugs are reached, but it is interesting:

    Chlorine Dioxide Gas Technology Report - YouTube http://goo.gl/3zBEM

    Here is a report using Chlorine Dioxide after Katrina from CNN. It says that the gas also kills termites:

    Benefits of Chlorine Dioxide CNN Report - YouTube http://goo.gl/t78Ic

  6. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jul 26 2012 13:39:29
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    Thanks bait...
    Here is a link to the full article
    http://www.clordisys.com/bedbugs.pdf

    Chlorine Dioxide was also used after Katrina as a mold treatment in water damaged buildings... I know a toxicologist that was monitoring the process for the Giuliani Environmental Group.

    There is a strong lingering chlorine smell after the treatment... the gas is corrosive... High concentrations used for treatment are hazardous for workers who must utilize full face respiratory protection and protective clothing.

    I don't see many advantages over Vikane fumigation which is already proven to be effective and is currently labeled for bed bugs... Occupants will still need to stay out of the work areas for at least 24 hours.

  7. AshamedandScratching

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jul 26 2012 19:05:47
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    Thanks, Doug. I wondered. I realized last year that my parents would be in a world of hurt in my situation when I had the infestation. They'd be hard-pressed to do the work, and vikane would be hard for them to afford on a fixed income. So now I keep an eye out for other alternatives in case I ever bring them a guest.


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