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gallery of common non bedbug artefacts

(11 posts)
  1. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Dec 23 2013 12:37:35
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    Hi All,

    As promised I found a little extra time today to put online a gallery of non bedbug artifacts that people can use as visual guides.

    I have tried to cover a range of materials and images but if you have examples that you would like to contribute please get in touch, I can always add more or add another gallery.

    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/bedbugslimitedbedbuggallery.html

    They are also available on my FlickR feed if anyone wants the embedding codes:

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bedbugsuk/sets/ in the non-bedbugs set

    Hope they are useful.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  2. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Dec 23 2013 14:23:50
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    Very informative, as usual, David. The pictures are well-defined and educational! Thank you.

    I thought you were working on this for your 10,000 post . . . you never said what you were working on for it?

    I still would really like to see pictures of a psocid and nymph of the same size side-by-side! (I started to compile something from photos on the forum, but then I didn't know if I had to ask permission so I stopped.

  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Dec 23 2013 14:40:46
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    Hi,

    Next time I find a Pscocid I will try and do that shot for you. The reality is that managing insects for images can be harder than herding cats but I will try using an extra stern voice for you.

    I also still need to do a faecal images gallery with annotated notes on some of the more subtle things you can learn from each.

    As posted above I am happy to receive images for others so place in a massive gallery, I was hoping to use some of the gallery filtering software but its all a little above my coding level.

    The 10,000th post concept took an interesting twist the other day and may actually change into something very different but exciting all the same.

    David

  4. JustChecking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Dec 23 2013 15:11:54
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    Very much appreciated for the photos and bugs ID 101, David!

    In this crazy bug world, your amazing and beautiful scenic pictures make me calmer.

    I don't have a habit of looking at my carpet and floors. So, every time I find an insect and I don't know what it is, it will make me uneasy. Since it is not an option for me to upload a picture for ID, it's great to see the non bed bugs in one place.

    ***Questions: how come I don't see a "fed" bed bug shed skin in this forum? Did I miss it? Would the fed bed bug shed skin be elongated rather than the typical flat shape? Can a carpet beetle have a fully intact elongated shed skin?

    JustChecking, not a therapist / bug pro
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  5. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Dec 23 2013 15:50:39
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    Hi,

    The process of shedding of the time is little studied but is very much a post feeding and post partial digestion process which is why they always appear to be paper thin versions of a round but not flat bedbug. I had actually sent a suggestion to someone earlier today about them getting footage but the equipment needed to do it justice is not easily available.

    The separating of the outer layers of the exoskeleton is most likely enzyme triggered and occurs in a narrow target band of cells (as is often the case in biological systems) which is why they have such a conserved appearance.

    Carpet beetles are always split down their length, if you are finding things that are more open at one end or cone/funnel shaped it usually means fleas.

    Yes there is an amazing beauty to the macro world and when you get your eye fixed on the detail you literally never see the world in the same way again.

    Hope that answers the additional questions.

    David

  6. JustChecking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Dec 23 2013 16:23:16
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    I think I just opened a can of worms.

    -do fleas have fully intact shred skin?

    -do carpet beetles "larva" have a split down their length fully intact shred skin? I don't remember the "split down" on top, but I do remember seeing the empty underside.

    -do carpet beetles "larva" fully intact shred skin look like a bed bug's round/elongated fully intact shred skin?

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Dec 23 2013 16:32:42
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    Hi,

    Fleas have larval, pupae then adults. Just like caterpillar, chrysalis then butterfly.

    Carpet beetles have larva then they shed and appear as adults from what appears to be the skin of the larval stage.

    The split on carpet beetle skins always runs down the length and never around the circumference of the larva.

    Yes this is why science can be a difficult one to communicate because there is a separate language which you often need to know to communicate the finer details and its often not as simple as say the building blocks of computer programming although they are also very different forms of logic. I aim to get the cameras fitted out for 2014 so that I can pop up a video to answer some of the questions like this.

    David

  8. JustChecking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Dec 23 2013 17:37:43
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    I am familiar with the life stages of fleas. Some time ago, when I found a mystery shred skin, it confused me because I haven't read that fleas would leave fully intact shred skin on carpet. The shred skin also did not look like a flea. With bed bug infestation being so popular, I couldn't help wondering what the shred skin represent.

    In order to confirm a bug here, I would have to post a picture. Since that's not possible, I asked an expert on another website what it is. He didn't think it's a bed bug shred skin but a carpet beetle larva. That's why I emphasized larva. He also added that I wouldn't be able to pick the bed bug shred skin without breaking it. I thought that's not right because I have seen fully intact bed bug pictures.

    Merry X'mas, David and everyone else!

  9. JustChecking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 26 2013 14:48:57
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    Thanks for last reply, David! I was stressed out about my Dec 23 cleaning day, which I started in the evening and stayed up the whole night to clean again.

    You will see what I mean by "elongated" if you look at the top centre picture in Lou's bedbug collection, http://www.flickr.com/photos/lou_bugs_pix/.

    The cast skin that I saw was more elongated and had longer legs and a head. It is different than this beetle's casing, http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/shellcasing-id-please.

    Are there any other insects that look like an elongated bed bug or bat bug?

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 26 2013 15:15:33
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    Hi,

    Bedbugs don't shed when in the elongated state.

    The behavioral traits associated with the elongated phase are "find a mate who have also just fed" and "get back to safety to digest this meal".

    Shedding appears to come days later when the energy is hat added from that meal.

    An elongated skin will not be from a bedbug.

    David

  11. JustChecking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 26 2013 20:15:31
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    What a relief (for now)!!!

    Thanks very much for the explanation and confirmation, David!


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