Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tales of Bed Bug Woe

Found 2 bugs, no bites in 19 days, what to do next??

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  1. imbuggedout

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 26 2011 11:32:25
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    Here's my story:

    Sometime around April 8th, I discovered a few bites on my right arm. I didn't think about the possibility of bedbugs at the time, but thinking back, I remember there were three in a row. After that, nothing.

    On April 15th, I find a bedbug crawling on my boyfriend's sweatshirt - he had been lounging on the couch in the living room. I didn't think it was a bedbug at first and we just killed it but he made an offhand remark about bedbugs and suddenly I remember the bites from April 8th and I started looking online for pictures. We fetched the bug out of the trash and it was a match. Panic (from me only, not my calm, level-headed bf) ensued.

    The next day I called a bedbug dog inspection team to come and sniff the apt and dog alerted in the bottom corner of my bed and the dresser in the bedroom. The living room was cleared. I then started to call a bunch of PCO's and got a whole range of quotes (from 600 dollars to 2500 dollars, depending on treatment). I was getting really confused about what to do because they all said the other treatments were ineffective - I really didn't want to have to deal with that - I just wanted a solution!

    Before I decided on anything, the apartment building had their exterminator come and look - he look at the bed area and didn't find anything but didn't examine anything else - just was double-checking the area the dog alerted to. Said I should get treated because I did find the one bedbug, which he ID'd.

    Throughout this process I started laundering and drying all my clothes and bagging them, vacuuming, etc. We dismantled the furniture in the bedroom and examined all the screwholes and crevices and found no signs of bedbugs - no shells, eggs, fecal matter, dead bugs, live bugs - nothing. We encased the mattress and pillows in Protect-a-Bed covers and put the Climb-Ups under the bed posts, and moved the bed away from the wall and all surrounding nightstands. I even got a PackTite and have been heating my books, bags, clothes, the wood slats from the bed..... The weird thing is, though, throughout this time, I hadn't been getting any more bites, and I have pretty strong reaction to bug bites.

    I decided to hold off on getting a PCO to come in and treat because I thought maybe it was a loner bug - it was definitely an adult, so I thought it would have had to feed multiple times if it had entered my apartment as a nymph or egg, but I had only had those bites once and my bf didn't have any (he may not react though). 19 days later I thought we were clear - no signs of bugs, no bites, but then last night, we found another bedbug crawling out from the sofa. We examined the crevices and cracks around the sofa and found no signs of bugs again, but I'm really concerned. After reading these forums I realize that dogs are not completely accurate and I should have looked for a team that did a physical inspection with the alerts, but I'd really hope that if there was an infestation in the couch the dog would have detected something!

    I just am not sure what step I should take next.... We're not getting bitten but we've found two live bugs now, and no other signs of bugs - cases, poop, eggs, etc. Should I just have the exterminator come in now? Should I wait for other signs? Should we just try to do some other treatment ourselves first? any help or advice would be appreciated - this has been an expensive emotional roller coaster!

  2. Patrick

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 26 2011 14:52:57
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    Typically there are about 5 levels of service you can look at for bed bugs.

    1) Do it yourself with products available from the marketplace, which every professional and most literature dissuade you from and I would agree.

    2) Spraying pesticide or spreading preventative DE dusting.

    3) Dry steam high heat and preventative DE dusting.

    4) Partial Heat treatment with dry steam high heat

    5) Total Heat treatment.

    Any solution should at the minimum also include the preventative DE dusting, climb up interceptors, and bed encasements, and some sort of guarantee or warranty.

    For a light-moderate infestation, Option 3 would be your most cost-effective solution. The Dry steam kills all stages of bed bugs on contact on all your fabric furniture. Interceptors and encasements prevent them from attaining a meal, and the dusting has residual killing effectiveness.

    Cheers.
    Patrick

    This post assumes all other prepatory measures are also being taken, laundering clothes, removing clutter, etc.

  3. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 26 2011 19:14:57
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    Patrick - 4 hours ago  » 
    Typically there are about 5 levels of service you can look at for bed bugs.
    1) Do it yourself with products available from the marketplace, which every professional and most literature dissuade you from and I would agree.
    2) Spraying pesticide or spreading preventative DE dusting.
    3) Dry steam high heat and preventative DE dusting.
    4) Partial Heat treatment with dry steam high heat
    5) Total Heat treatment.

    Patrick,

    Welcome to the forums.

    Readers should understand that there are also other methods which do work well to get rid of bed bugs. Many people get rid of bed bugs with:
    dry vapor steam + pesticides, or
    dry vapor steam + pesticides + dust, or
    Vikane gas fumigation (like heat, done properly, it is supposed to be a one-shot treatment).

    I think it's important not to represent the highest level treatment modality your firm apparently offers (heat treatment) as the highest level solution. It can work well, but we've also heard cases where other treatment modalities worked well, as well as incidents where heat failed or caused damage.

    Can you elucidate further what is meant by "Partial Heat treatment with dry steam high heat"?
    Thanks.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  4. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 26 2011 19:22:31
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    imbuggedout - 7 hours ago  » 
    I just am not sure what step I should take next.... We're not getting bitten but we've found two live bugs now, and no other signs of bugs - cases, poop, eggs, etc. Should I just have the exterminator come in now? Should I wait for other signs? Should we just try to do some other treatment ourselves first? any help or advice would be appreciated - this has been an expensive emotional roller coaster!

    Hi imbuggedout,

    Sorry you have to deal with this. Seeing two live bed bugs in your home is evidence that you have bed bugs. Finding harborages, and even finding fecal stains and other evidence, can be tricky for people who do not have experience searching for bed bugs.

    Keep in mind that your partner may simply not be reacting to bed bug bites, but might start reacting in time, or not (many never do).

    If it were me, I would try and hire the firm which seems most knowledgeable (and consider whether they offer guarantees). Yes, unfortunately, many will make claims about others' treatment plans being ineffective.

    Some treatment methods are more effective or may work more quickly than others, but knowledge and experience is the most important thing, and a knowledgeable person with a steamer, a spraycan and duster can do the job well, while an inexperienced firm can make a mess with the most expensive treatment protocols (heat/thermal or Vikane gas). Hope this helps!

  5. imbuggedout

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 26 2011 20:55:20
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    Hi Nobugsonme,

    Thanks for your response - I wish the news were better - this has been the most stressful thing I've ever experienced - I feel like I'm going to go crazy! I'm so paranoid about leaving my apartment and bringing bugs in and out with me. The most daunting task ahead of me is clearing out the place to prepare for treatment - I have so many books and computer equipment the thought of going through everything just makes me want to cry! Heating everything with the PackTite is going to take days, especially since I have to work everyday.

    As for exterminator firms - you mentioned guarantees - *should* they offer guarantees? One firm said they wouldn't offer a guarantee because they don't know if the tenant is preparing the apt properly for treatment or if the tenant bring bugs back in. This firm also seemed the most knowledgeable to me, but I don't want to end up paying 1000s of dollars every time I see a bug....

    I hate the feeling that I'm being scammed because of my fear, and yet I can't shake it. One place gave me two different quotes on two different days - a 500 dollar difference.

  6. imbuggedout

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 26 2011 21:11:28
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    By the way, here are the four different treatments that were being offered. I'm not sure what is best... if anyone can recommend reliable, honest PCO who isn't trying to scam me, I'd really appreciate it...

    1) Cryonite + residual pesticides - 3 treatments in total, $1600 - don't know if there's a guarantee
    2) Eco-friendly pesticides - 2 treatments, $2500 - don't know if there's a guarantee
    3) Eco-friendly extreme heat treatment, 5-8 hours over 2 days, no pre-treatment inspection - I have to pay for a k9 inspection after treatment and there's no follow-up, 30 day guarantee from first day of treatment, $1800-$2250 quoted
    4) Full chemical pesticide treatment, $600 first treatment, $200 each after (special deal through my apt complex), no guarantees

    It seemed like each place treated different things - the full chemical treatment guy sounded like they would treat the furniture and the baseboards and the places where the walls meet the ceilings, etc. The heat guy sounded like they steamed the carpet and baseboards but wouldn't do furniture unless I explicitly told them which things to steam (that seemed weird to me?) I guess the cryonite would be on contact and the residual pesticides were around the baseboards. The eco-green pesticides also was around the baseboards and electrical outlets and maybe the furniture...

    all non-cryonite people said cryonite treatment doesn't work, chemical guy said heat wouldn't work, chemical guy also said k9 detection doesn't work without inspection, heat guy said k9s are better than human inspections... aaarrrrrrg

    I'd appreciate if anyone could help me filter through this!

  7. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 26 2011 22:29:53
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    Timeline:

    1. You suspect bed bugs caused the three "bites" in a row on your arm on April 8.
    2. You find a bed bug on April 15 (confirmed by PCO), crawling on bf's shoulder while he sits on sofa.
    3. Dog alerts to bed and dresser but alerts are NOT visually confirmed by handler.
    Cursory inspection of same areas by PCO later yields nothing.
    4. You do various kinds of prep but do not get more bites.
    5. 19 days later you find a second bed bug. On the sofa.

    Non-expert analysis (I want to stress that I am not a pest expert!)

    I am concerned about the sofa. Although it's possible each of two bed bugs hitchhiked to the sofa on a person, I would suspect that bed bugs are harboring on or near it.

    Possibilities (not in order of likelihood):

    You or boyfriend are bringing bed bugs in (e.g. from infested workplace, friend's home, etc.).
    There were two bed bugs in your apartment and they are both dead.
    You found two bed bugs in your apartment and there are more (or eggs, or both).
    There are no more bites because there are no more bed bugs.
    There are no more bites because you are not reacting.
    Bed bugs are coming from attached neighbors.

    The most important thing is to verify you still have bed bugs.

    Is there any chance at all that your building's exterminator misidentified the bed bug (and you and bf followed suit with the second bug)?

    It's probably a slim chance, but it has happened before and so it would reassure some of us, I am sure, to see a photo if you can post one on a free hosting site and post a link to view it here.

    Even assuming the two bugs were correctly identified, it's quite possible you killed or caught all bed bugs present. That would be quite lucky, but not impossible.

    But for peace of mind, I think before you shell out a lot of money, you want to make sure you have bed bugs.

    You can verify you have bed bugs in a number of ways: (a) hire a canine team where the handler promises to visually verify all dog alerts, which your first handler did not do, or (b) hire a human inspector who spends HOURS searching an apartment, or (c) lay out various kinds of monitors and wait and see.

    The last one gambles on making the problem a bit worse because it means you are delaying treatment which may be needed. In this case, if you don't get further bites or catch bed bugs in monitors, you might still want to employ an inspector or dog team that verifies alerts in say, 3 weeks, assuming you don't get a bite or catch a bed bug sooner than that, and spring into action by hiring a PCO.

    If you decide to hire a human inspector, many have suggested hiring one that charges for visual inspections, because this removes some of the incentive for selling you a treatment job that you don't need. (Obviously, some people may do a hard sell regardless.)

    If you hire a second dog team, please be sure and read our FAQ on canine scent detection. Many experts tell us you should hire a team where the handler visually verifies all alerts. Without a visual verification, you cannot be sure you have bed bugs.

    If you want to go with monitors, many have used the BBAlert Passive or ClimbUps, and Bed Bug Beacon active monitors (we're told the latter should run for at least two weeks).

    BBAlert Passive was invented by David Cain (bedbugscouk on the forums) and he can advise you on the possibilities of using one on your sofa.

    Also see our FAQ on monitors and FAQ on detection.

    As for choosing a treatment method right off the bat, there are pros and cons to all, and as I noted earlier, a knowledgeable and experienced pro with the most basic tools CAN do a better job than an inexperienced person with better tools or fancier plans. So there's no cut and dried answer.

    Some firms offer guarantees, others don't. If you're going for an expensive treatment then this might be something you want to consider. They rarely last long (1 month is common for heat or Vikane). Some firms agree to come back "for a year" but this is rare and raises flags for me -- we've heard of some firms doing this and treating for bed bugs at 1- or 2-month intervals, which is not helpful.

    1) Cryonite + residual pesticides - 3 treatments in total, $1600 - don't know if there's a guarantee

    Cryonite can work, but it is a CONTACT killer. It only kills bed bugs you hit directly. Repeat treatments seem to be needed by most people we hear from. Sometimes people have had more than three.

    2) Eco-friendly pesticides - 2 treatments, $2500 - don't know if there's a guarantee

    "Eco-friendly pesticides" is pretty vague. I've heard this applied to contact killers and to pyrethrins. Without knowing more, I would just say that it seems odd that someone who's going to spray twice (with whatever) would charge more than someone doing a full heat treatment -- or any of the other options you mention.

    If you find out more about what they do (do they use steam? Dust? Will they name the products?) I might have a more favorable view. Still, bed bugs often take more than two treatments spaced 10-14 days apart, so if someone is applying steam/dust/sprays, I would be concerned if this was two visits as well as the most expensive option.

    3) Eco-friendly extreme heat treatment, 5-8 hours over 2 days, no pre-treatment inspection - I have to pay for a k9 inspection after treatment and there's no follow-up, 30 day guarantee from first day of treatment, $1800-$2250 quoted

    Heat treatment can work. You should find out the name of the technology used by your firm (which may be Temp-Air, ThermaPure Heat, or another). Read some reviews here if the firm is mentioned on the forums. PM me if you want help finding posts about these companies (if you PM me, let me know your city and the firms, if you like, and I can help you find articles here if they exist). The price is about right for structural heat treatment.

    Can you choose the k9 team, or is it part of the firm? Do they do visual verifications of dog alerts?
    Heat can be wonderfully effective. It can also fail. And it can cause damage. An experienced service provider is essential.

    4) Full chemical pesticide treatment, $600 first treatment, $200 each after (special deal through my apt complex), no guarantees

    Just residual sprays? Dusts? Steam?
    Again, you might want to research the firm, because if they're good, they might do a good job. On the other hand, you don't want to shell out a lot of money just because the apartment knows them.

    Have bed bugs been a problem in your building? All units adjacent to ones known to have had bed bugs should really be inspected (and treated if need be). I can't stress this enough. If your neighbors have them and are sending them over, the building simply has to deal with this.

  8. imbuggedout

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 26 2011 23:07:06
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    Nonbugsonme, you are awesome. Thank you for such a detailed response, it really helps me think about the situation without being overwhelmed. I'll try to post pictures of the bugs I've found - I'm pretty sure they are bedbugs.

    I've talked to the manager and she said there have been no reports of bedbugs in the building, but of course that doesn't mean there are no other apts with bedbugs...

    As for the firm doing heat treatment - they don't choose the k9 team, I do... so I guess it's up to me to make sure they do visual inspection as well. Although, I must say I'm a little wary of the the k9 inspection since the dog did not alert near the sofa and you express concern about the sofa and I am also concerned about the sofa. (I know that the handler also really needs to know what he's doing...)

    I'll PM you regarding the firms..

  9. Patrick

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 27 2011 15:43:02
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    Nobugsonme: Absolute efficacy at this point is Total Heat/Total Fumigation period, where the enitre structure is heated/fumigated. Of course the efficacy depends on the expertise of the firm doing the heating/fumigating. This is usually only needed however for heavy infestations. Light to moderate can usually be cleared up with just Dry Steam treatments.

    Part of the efficacy of Total Structural Heat is cyclonic heating. Ask if they are heating how many fans are they bringing per heating unit. You need fans to redistribute the heat to all parts of the structure, with sensors that monitor high and low points to effectively pinpoint cold sinks. 1 cold sink could harbor dozens of bed bugs. This is where you need an experienced company. Most apartments have cement floors that stay relatively cool with just heaters, if fans are forcing heated air onto the floor it will remain below the remediation zone.

    Pyrethroids/other organic/pesticidal sprays, if you look at current studies and industry research shows resistance and generally is not effective residually. Furthermore eggs are not killed by these 'contact' killers. You can expect 3-5 treatments to get it to the point where you cannot find evidence of bed bugs, yet generally they are still there and will manifest themselves again in time.

    I can temper my comments with the fact that my market is Canada and the US has more pesticides available than do we, however my understanding of the US based research remains the same, sprays simply are not 100% effective. Just remember, 1 adult bed bug lays 1-5 eggs a day and up to 200 in their lifespan. Miss 1 bed bug and you havent rid yourself of them. In our field trials, Cryonite acted much like all the other chemically available sprays, in that it is a contact killer and too many retreats are required for it to be effective.

    The process I mentioned is a 4-fold process that layers your defence against bed bugs. Heat/Dry Steam, DE dusting, Climb up interceptors, and bed encasements.

    Partial Heating, is simply Heating a part of a structure that is the worst area affected, but still Dry steam heating any other fabric furniture and the rest of the process I mentioned.

    Other advice, generally a Human inspector typically only finds 20-30% of an infestation. If you found 2-3 bugs, chances are there are more. Secondary transfer will always be an issue. You could be treated today, be free of bed bugs and tomorrow pick them up from someone else and bring them home, its the current reality. If you are diligent however you can avoid bringing them home. In 7 years our firm has not had one outbreak of bed bugs among its employees, with over 10,000 services performed.

    If you suspect bed bugs while you are out shopping/visiting, visually inspect your clothes before entering your home. Physically shake out pant legs and other crevices in your clothes. Upon entering your home, immediately put all your clothing in the dryer on medium-high heat for at least 20 minutes. Buy a contact spray killer and spray your shoes (test the fabric first).

    Look for at least a 3 month warranty with a free 2nd retreat. Not sure why Nobugsonme is skeptical of a year warranty. We have a one year limited warranty. 1 free retreat, 25% prorated of original invoice for a year after the second treatment, protects the customer and the company, from shoddy work on the company side and from reinfestation on the customer side.

    I hope some of this helps.
    Patrick

  10. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 27 2011 23:32:31
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    Patrick - 7 hours ago  » 
    Nobugsonme: Absolute efficacy at this point is Total Heat/Total Fumigation period, where the enitre structure is heated/fumigated. Of course the efficacy depends on the expertise of the firm doing the heating/fumigating. This is usually only needed however for heavy infestations. Light to moderate can usually be cleared up with just Dry Steam treatments.

    My concern was that you did not mention total fumigation as an option which is equal to total heat treatment. I realize that's because it may not be offered in your area (is that right?)

    However, I want consumers to be aware that there are options, and I think there's a tendency for those in the business to mention their methods and leave out others. It's understandable.

    Heat can be very effective if done properly, and I often recommend it to people. On the other hand, finding a knowledgeable and experienced team is key.

    Pyrethroids/other organic/pesticidal sprays, if you look at current studies and industry research shows resistance and generally is not effective residually. Furthermore eggs are not killed by these 'contact' killers. You can expect 3-5 treatments to get it to the point where you cannot find evidence of bed bugs, yet generally they are still there and will manifest themselves again in time.

    I am aware of this. I did not suggest pyrethroid sprays, for example, or pesticide sprays alone, as a best option.

    However, whereas you're recommending

    2) Spraying pesticide or spreading preventative DE dusting.
    3) Dry steam high heat and preventative DE dusting.

    ... I am suggesting that dry steam heat may also be effectively followed by pesticides and dusts. This is a protocol used by lots of firms, and it doesn't seem like there's a reason it would be less effective than dry steam and dust alone, your recommendation.

    In our field trials, Cryonite acted much like all the other chemically available sprays, in that it is a contact killer and too many retreats are required for it to be effective.

    As I said, the other poster was offered a package of three Cryonite treatments, and there's no way to know this will be enough.

    Partial Heating, is simply Heating a part of a structure that is the worst area affected, but still Dry steam heating any other fabric furniture and the rest of the process I mentioned.

    Thanks for clarifying. You may be doing a good job of this. However, we've heard some firms make a mess of it. As I am sure you'll agree, partial heating done improperly, is a bad idea. The problem for consumers is knowing if the company they hire knows what they're doing.

    Not sure why Nobugsonme is skeptical of a year warranty. We have a one year limited warranty. 1 free retreat, 25% prorated of original invoice for a year after the second treatment, protects the customer and the company, from shoddy work on the company side and from reinfestation on the customer side.

    Sorry it wasn't clear. I wasn't thinking of a free retreatment and then a discounted retreatment after that. (By the way, do you offer this -- one free retreatment up to a year later -- for total heat clients?!?)

    Anyway, what I said was this:

    Some firms agree to come back "for a year" but this is rare and raises flags for me -- we've heard of some firms doing this and treating for bed bugs at 1- or 2-month intervals, which is not helpful.

    There is nothing wrong with a year's guarantee. Sounds wonderful.

    However, the key phrase above was "treating for bed bugs at 1- or 2-month intervals". I should have explained it in more detail. We have heard some firms give one bed bug treatment (sprays/dusts) and agree to come back for a year (or six months, or whatever) -- 100% free of charge, mind you.

    Unfortunately, if you give just one spray/dust treatment, you will not wipe out bed bugs in most cases. These firms wait for clients to detect the problem as ongoing before scheduling a second treatment.

    And they tend to judge "ongoing" from bites (and we know at least 30% of people do not react), or bed bug sightings (and bed bugs, as we know, are difficult to catch in the act).

    So in a month or two, the client discovers they really still have bed bugs, and they get another treatment. And then they wait. And a month or two later, they notice the problem continues and get another treatment... now you realize they're probably going to need more than a year of service, because within a month or two bed bug eggs have hatched and bed bugs have moved most of the way through the life cycle.

    I'm sure you'll agree it's a ridiculous way to go about things, but we have heard this one more than once.

    On the other hand, if a firm offers a proper treatment (either a course of visits for steam/pesticides/dusts or a one-off treatment like total heat or total Vikane gas fumigation), then of course a year's guarantee is wonderful, but a full guarantee of retreatments without cost up to a year later is something I have never heard of outside the scenario I described above, and it would set off alarm bells.

    Hope that clarifies my comments.

  11. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 27 2011 23:46:51
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    imbuggedout - 1 day ago  » 
    Nonbugsonme, you are awesome. Thank you for such a detailed response, it really helps me think about the situation without being overwhelmed. I'll try to post pictures of the bugs I've found - I'm pretty sure they are bedbugs.
    I've talked to the manager and she said there have been no reports of bedbugs in the building, but of course that doesn't mean there are no other apts with bedbugs...

    Sadly, it doesn't even mean they aren't aware of other apartments with bed bugs.

    Anyway, cynicism aside, if your unit has bed bugs, the landlord should have a PCO or good k9 team inspect all attached units to yours. I realize they may be resistant ($$$), but maybe if you're getting a k9 with a handler who visually verifies alerts, they can make some kind of deal to do the other units cheaply (perhaps after verifying bed bugs are present in your place -- to avoid unnecessary costs if they aren't).

    It is not unusual for someone with a small infestation to later find out an attached neighbor (or unit even further away) has a major one. And some folks either have issues which prevent them detecting the problem or dealing with it properly, or simply don't notice. If you can manage it, it's better to rule this out before you drop a few thousand on treatment.

    Many PCOs will tell you or your landlord that they need to inspect attached units (above, below, all sides) and many customers or landlords will of course say no.

    As for the firm doing heat treatment - they don't choose the k9 team, I do... so I guess it's up to me to make sure they do visual inspection as well. Although, I must say I'm a little wary of the the k9 inspection since the dog did not alert near the sofa and you express concern about the sofa and I am also concerned about the sofa. (I know that the handler also really needs to know what he's doing...)

    Choosing the k9 team yourself is good, I think.

    Dogs aren't equally effective or trained and handled equally well.

    It's also possible the sofa was not a hot spot then. But your original team did not verify alerts visually, so I'd choose another based on that alone.

    Thanks for your kind words, by the way.

  12. Lllo

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Thu Nov 17 2016 18:15:06
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    In late Sept I had a series of bites but saw no bugs. Between Oct 22 and Nov 10 I had 10 bites. Some of those I know I got in bed. We found carpet beetles and my husband took apart the bedroom, vacuumed and steamed the bed and carpet 2 days in a row and continued to vacuum daily until yesterday. We had an inspection and neither the PCO nor us found any evidence.
    I was spending a lot of time sitting on my couch and sometimes falling asleep there but it is a dark colour and difficult to inspect. I have had no bites since Dec 10. We set out traps and found 2 nymphs on that couch.

    Today the house was treated. They vacuumed, steamed and used chemicals. They found 1 dead adult in the family room. They will be back in 2 weeks to repeat and we will continue vacuuming every other day. They suggested this was a very minor infestation. I'm still worried Should I relax a little

  13. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Thu Nov 24 2016 1:54:33
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    Lllo,

    To avoid "hijacking" this thread, please repost your message in a new thread. I suggest that those who wish to respond to you click the status under your username (currently "newbite") to go to your profile and read and respond to your new thread.


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