Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tales of Bed Bug Woe

Follow-up on treatment of single family home in Denver

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  1. bummedindenver

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Nov 25 2007 22:02:29
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    We started having problems nearly 2 months ago. I immediately recognized the 3 bites in a row pattern because of an unfortunate experience at a vacation rental several years ago.

    I found a PCO I thought sounded good, but they have let me down. The company is Envirotech in the Denver area--and after 3 treatments (that is their protocol....3 treatments spaced by 2 weeks) and no end to the bites, the owner had the gall to say to me that my bites might be caused by something other than bed bugs, and until I produce "evidence", they won't come back. We've never seen a bug, so we hired her company to come and inspect and confirm bed bugs for us.

    Now she says that we must not have bed bugs becuase the last two treatments, her tech did not see evidence (ie trails or cast skeletons) during his "thorough" inspection. He inspected and treated my entire 2,000 square foot house in approximately one hour. AND I had just vacuumed EVERYTHING in my house, as instructed, as part of my prep moments before his arrival.

    Oh, and this same fella told her my bites were not consistent with bed bug bites. Uh huh. When I told him my bites started on my face and neck, he told me bed bugs don't usually bite people on the face.

    OH REALLY???

    Let's just say, they spent the same amount of time treating my friend's apartment (tiny one bedroom unit) as they did treating our entire house. We (my husband and I) have both been bitten--me on the face, neck, wrist, shoulders, back, and chest. He on the arms, legs, back, shoulders and chest. The bites slowed down after treatment one, but never stopped. Treatment 2 again caused a slow down, but within a week, the bites started picking up steam. And after treatment 3, we have both been bitten.

    lieutenantDan....are you out there? didn't you stop after 3 treatments on your house? And what did you do next? I am fed up and feeling like these people are clueless idiots. Bed bugs don't bite people on the face??? And this is supposed to be one of the "better" companies in the Denver area.

    When I mentioned the potential for pesticide resistance (the mere potential) the owner said, "and why would Suspend work on other people's bugs but not yours?" Ummm, maybe because I brought home a population of resistant bugs and other people brought home susceptible populations.

    If these people have no brains, how are we supposed to have any confidence in their abilities????

    Not sure what to do next and feeling pretty dang depressed. They also clearly have not honored their warranty, so I am looking at how to pursue that. If no one has seen a bug throughout the process, how can they demand an actual bug now? Sure would love to know a lawyer right now who did this kind of work.....

  2. blearyeyed

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Nov 25 2007 23:27:46
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    ugh...there's nothing like a clueless-seeming PCO to make you sink into despair. sorry you're having such a bad experience. i would feel like they were not as informed as they should be (based on your account) though probably still better than many others out there. have you tried giving them the data that you've read? you might look around on this site and find some of the links to research on treating BBs, print it out, highlight the important parts, and ask them to discuss it with you. there are a whole lot of differing opinions out there; it's possible that they have good reasons for the way they do their treatments, and good answers to the research you show them. and if they don't then you may have some legal recourse.

    also, have you read the thread on BB traps? i've been thinking about trying that out to confirm the presence of BBs, maybe you could catch one that way and turn it in as evidence? good luck!!

  3. cosbear

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 1:21:48
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    Dear bummedindenver:

    So sorry to hear of your difficulties. I know how frustrating bbs can be. In spite of what your PCO says, I think your right it sounds like bb bites and your probably going to see it get worse if you don't keep aggressively seeking alternative ways to solve the problem. I know it's expensive but I think in your situation I would find another PCO and bring them in. The PCO that treated my place successfully in Ohio sprayed once a week for sixteen weeks and then for another 8 weeks. The state regulations about treatments are different from state to state. He was very thorough and spent a lot of time, chemicals and work trying to help us save our furniture. In the end the box springs had to go and the living room furniture which was less than a year old, before we stopped getting bites. Traps do sound like a good idea, having proof is important.

    Try to figure out where you and your husband are getting the bites. It can help you to find and deal with the source of problem. Have you used the means here and on the website for treating and isolating your beds? If you can make your beds secure and be sure you aren't getting bit there it's easier to test the other places in the house you might be getting bitten. Start with the places you hang out the most. They are somewhat more likely to bite you in a place you spend time relaxing in. Once your bed is secure you can eliminate one by one the other most likely places you are getting bites. If your favorite pieces of furniture where you relax are the source of your bites there may be no saving them even with a competent PCO. In Ohio where I was living many of the PCO's won't even sign a contract to treat for bedbugs if you are not willing to get rid of all your upholstered furniture and bugproof your bed with treatments, encasements, and some means of isolation.

    It has been my experience that PCO's alone are not a solution. I know it works for some, but it didn't for me. Read everything here you can, in the forum and the site and other sites. Information can be your greatest tool for beating them. Also ask for advice and keep asking, people here understand what your going through and will try to help. When all of your friends and relatives are as tired of hearing about your bugs, these folks will still be here for you and will understand in ways that others who have not been through it cannot.

    In spite of all my dire talk, please try to keep up your hope. As frustrating as it can be to be getting bites while not being able to find the bugs, I'm hoping that means your place is not seriously infested yet. This will get worse with time however if you are not aggressive in seeking effective means of killing them off. As long as they can eat and breed it seems the problem only gets worse. Now is the time to get very aggressive in the long run it will save on money, misery and continued suffering.

    I lived in the Denver and outlying areas for many years and still go for visits and business several times of year. I sure miss the mostly mild climate and dry air out there. Many other things as well. I wish you all the best and hope you find some relief soon. Later... cos

  4. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 12:39:27
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    BID,

    Sorry you're having this trouble.

    You said,

    "Now she says that we must not have bed bugs becuase the last two treatments, her tech did not see evidence (ie trails or cast skeletons) during his "thorough" inspection."

    So does this mean they DID find evidence before the first treatment?

    I would ask if they would come again when you have not vacuumed for a week. If they required you to vacuum before they came, it could have removed any visual evidence.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  5. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 13:40:29
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    bummedindenver,
    you said-
    lieutenantDan....are you out there? didn't you stop after 3 treatments on your house? And what did you do next? I am fed up and feeling like these people are clueless idiots. Bed bugs don't bite people on the face??? And this is supposed to be one of the "better" companies in the Denver area.

    I will try to answer you the best that I can.
    The PCO treated three times because I still found a bug or two alive and I demanded treatments. My contract was six weeks and three treatrmenmts if I remember correctly, it was a verbal contract. The first two treatments were Suspend SC and Gentrol mix
    (before the Gentrol talk that Gentrol may do the opposite). The final was with Whitmire BP300 an petroleum based pesticide.
    I was not allowed in for that and he had to put protective gear on. That final spray was in Mid December 2006 and I did not see a bug until I found a dead third instar which was in late January 2007. I am currently in the process in researching my mystery bite sensations and reactions. I have not found exact evidence that I still have bbs. I inspect constantly, I have painted, cleaned, steamed, sprayed Bedlam and used DE. I have found a couple of brown banded roach nymphs which gave me a little scare. I have also collected fly type of specimens which could be bitting midges and I am sending them out today for a friend to review who is an entomologist. I have also recently collected a specimen that was so small and traveling on the underside of my mattress of my couch. It turned out to be a springtail. I am also curious about mites because I know for a fact that some people have had this problem. I am also concerned about reactions to pesticides and reactions brought on by stress and delayed reactions brought on by stress from old bed bug bites.

    Some PCOs and PCO companies are still, in my opinion, are having a hard time batteling bed bugs. The pesticide restriction placed on us starting with the banning of DDT in the early 1970s has something to do with the inability to eradicate or control bed bug infestations along with the inexperience of PCOs with bed bugs.

    My suggestion is that you battle hard. Research steamers and DYI pesticide products but use with care. I love to steam.
    Also Freshwater Food Grade DE which experts are saying will kill bed bugs if they come in contact with it.
    Do not vacuum a couple of days before PCO arrives no matter what they say and if they ask just say that you did follow PCOs instructions. We have to use common sense. I now have my own ideas and tactics that may differ from PCOs tactics.
    Years ago PCOs were called EXTERMINATORS. I like that better.

    Was I able to help you?

    Best of LUCK and fight hard and win, you have no other options.

  6. pleasehelp

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 15:03:32
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    Hi LtDan,
    Thanks for all the info. I'm still in the market for a good dry steamer. Do you have any recommendations?

  7. currentinsomniac

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 15:24:26
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    I seem to be having the same trouble as bummedindenver.

    Our PCO has been treating, but I haven't seen any decrease in bite numbers...and it seems to just be increasing by the day. I have followed the advice found on the site in isolating....washing clothes, bedding, etc. I have steamed in the past and am using DE all over my carpets. (with our PCO's blessing). Our PCO has used Tempo SC Ultra...and, in my opinion done the job thoroughly. He's treated the baseboards, our couches, mattresses, frames, etc, but I haven't seen any effect. Am I just being totally impatient? Should I just wait and see what the 3rd treatment this coming Friday brings?
    The only other PCO that seemed good in my area was one that used the Gentrol/suspend combo and sprayed down all the carpet (and made you leave your house for over 8 hours).
    But I think I missed the Gentrol conversation. There's talk that it doesn't stop them molting?
    Please fill me in....
    ...and any advice....comfort...you can give would be appreciated. I didn't think my infestation was all that big because we "probably" got it around Oct 26th, but now I wonder what we might be dealing with.
    (It also scares me that my one neighbor seems to personally know so much about these critters. She said her dad had them multiple times while living in Peru for a time....but has she had experience? I wonder.....)

  8. victory

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 15:50:13
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    Does anyone know if a steamer such as this one would be effective?
    http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=7780086

  9. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 16:02:26
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    pleasehelp,
    Steamers. Although some professionals are concerned about a mold problem which can happen with using steam and push for a certain type of steamer I found that a $40.00 Shark hand held steamer with attachments and case from Bed, Bath & Beyond is hot enough to burn me so it should burn the bed bugs. I deal with mold possibilities by using AC in summer and put up the heat in the winter. Professionals state that one should use the moplike attachment because it provides a hotter and even distribution of heat and wont blow the nymphs around like the blasting attachment can do. I use both attachments.

    currentinsomniac,
    Maybe Nobugsonme can help find some info in the sites archives for you. It had been said that Gentrol actually enhances the reproduction of the bed bugs instead of rendering them infertile. I have not seen any written studies on this.

    Based on what experts are stating on the pesticide resistance of some bed bugs I think steaming is a major weapon in the war.
    Pesticides must still be used and cleaning be done.

  10. pleasehelp

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 16:10:27
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    Thanks LtDan!

  11. itchyincharmcity

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 16:47:34
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    dang, my PCO is using Gentrol today!

  12. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 16:52:18
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    itchyincharmcity,
    Like I said. I have not seen any confirmed studies on Gentrol. Check University of Kentucky, email Potter and ask him.

  13. bummedindenver

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 26 2007 20:52:58
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    Thanks to all for the support and encouragement. As we all know, we ALL need it....

    lieutenantdan, yes, your comments helped. I seemed to recall that you had three treatments and then were continuing on your own, but I couldn't remember exactly what you did.

    Nobugsonme, well, your question is a good one. Prior to the first treatment I had them come inspect, because I suspected bbs but didn't want to spray without proof (though they were willing to set me up for treatment prior to any inspection or confirmation of any kind). They came, saw no bugs, but saw trails and cast skeletons in one futon, not the bed. Nothing in the bed.

    I threw out that futon prior to treatment number one. So day of treatment #1, there would have been no visible evidence, given the prep vacuuming I had done. The PCO saw "bugs scurrying in a corner" after he used a flushing agent, but he was too far away to confirm that they were bed bugs. So, the only proof was the evidence in the futon we got rid of, and after treatment 1 we found a blood spot on our mattress encasement. Later, disturbingly, after treatment 2, we found blood stains on the sheet, but we cannot say for certain WHEN they happened, because it is possible they were from much earlier and we just didn't notice.

    So, we certainly have had evidence of bed bugs. But of course, there will be no visual evidence right after I do a thorough prep. And THAT is her justification for saying, nope, they're gone. She said they will not come back until I produce "evidence" now. Because my bites (and my husband's bites) are no longer evidence, apparently.

    But good idea about asking them to come back when I haven't vacuumed. It's the whole getting them to come back part that is the trick now.

    I actually made an appointment to see the dermatologist for Wednesday, day after tomorrow. So maybe I can get some "proof" there.

    Sigh.

    Thanks all. And good luck to you all too.

    lieutenantdan is right about one thing--gotta fight hard. There is no other option when you own the house. When I tell my husband how hard this is, especially because of the impact on my social life (I need to be around people), his suggestion: then stop caulking so much and go out to lunch. He doesn't GET that the bugs aren't going to wait for me to have time to finish the caulking, etc. He thinks we can take our sweet time and get to it all when we have time.

    He calls my approach the nuclear approach, and it is so frustrating, because he hasn't been to this board. He hasn't read all thse stories and he doesn't GET how hard it is to eliminate these things. He gets mad at me for wanting to throw out a bunch of old, useless books. He wouldn't let me get rid of the futon couch that HE got bitten in the other day, after treatment 3. I am so mad. If we had gotten rid of it when I got rid of the other things......but he refused. Sorry.....it's hard enough to battle the bugs when you have another battle going on in the house at the same time.

  14. itchyincharmcity

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 27 2007 12:21:00
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    I am all for the nuclear approach, I think you are doing the rigt thing. I, too, own my place and while I haven't gone fully nuclear I did try to act quickly and aggressively. And I am having a problem trying to convice the PCO to do more than one treatment to I look to you and others taking matters into their own hands as an example for what I can do.

    Tell your husband that he can make a case for keeping books or furniture when he takes the lead on combating the problem. IMO the person doing the work gets to make the decisions. If he gets educated about BBS and/or helps do work then he can negotiate.

    However, I do think you can take an hour to go to lunch if you are going psycho from your bug obsession. The stress and psychological effects do take their toll on all of us and you can't let these little bugs ruin your mental health. They will not overrun your entire house in just one hour, and they will still be there when you get back. Sometimes getting your mind off the problem for a short time helps you feel recharcged and re-energized to resume annhialating BBs!

  15. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 27 2007 15:17:33
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    bummedindenver,
    I just want to show you support and let you know that I know exactly how you feel. It is hard to really enjoy yourself when you are a true bed bug Warrior. You feel as if you should be fighting all of the time until the enemy is defeated and surrenders.
    itchyincharmcity has it correct these bugs play on your mental health. This is what the politicians, mental health officials and reporters need to understand. People need government support with money and guidelines for PCOs to follow. How can a person who is not educated in pesticides make a decision on their own about what pesticides will be used and the effect on a person health may have. We are trusting a large variety of PCO companies to make the decisions for us without much if any government input. Who is protecting our health? This bed bug epidemic is such a can of worms that governmant is sweeping it under the carpet with hope that it will go away. It is not going away it is getting worse and too many people are suffering.
    Remember that as of now it is understood that bed bugs do not spread disease but would the people who are saying that bet their entire savings on that statement? I don't think so. And what about mental health?

  16. bummedindenver

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 27 2007 19:49:59
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    Thanks you guys,
    well, it isn't as bad as I make it out. I mean, it's not like I really don't leave to go out to lunch and work. It's just that socially, (and I'm a social person), this is very very hard for me--the isolation--the needing to be working on THIS all the time. So my husband was being a little flippant and meant, in general, I should not be so focused on fighting all the time. But he is busier than I am. I work part-time. He works full-time. More of the responsibility DOES rest on me, and if I don't do it, it might not happen. And as you know, we have no choice but to keep fighting. He also doesn't have as many bites.

    And honestly, I AM educated about pesticides, but that doesn't make it any easier. My background (I'll probably be revealing too much if I say it....) includes a graduate degree in toxicology. If anything, it made it a lot more difficult for me to say OK, go spray my house. But I was desperate. I didn't want to keep showing my face in public with bites! But given my experience, I'm thinking these pyrethroid pesticides aren't cutting it at my house. And I'm not willing to undergo treatment after treatment after treatment. And, given the choice between bites and notching up the level of toxicity of the chemicals used in my house, I'm taking the bites. What's next? Organophosphates? I don't think so. Not in my house.

    Doesn't matter how much you know. When these things come into your house, you are as desperate as anyone else.

    I think we all agree, one of the hardest things is sitting here, going through this, knowing it is going to get worse and having the government and media do very little. but, it's like everything else in life. Until something hits home.....it's never quite real or pressing.

  17. itchyincharmcity

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 12:34:11
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    Bummed, have you successfully isolated the bed? If you can do it at least you can get a good night's sleep without waking up with bites.

  18. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 13:23:13
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    bummedindenver.
    I was wondering if you would be kind enough to fill us in on pesticides since you are educated in this area?

  19. bummedindenver

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    Wed Nov 28 2007 17:43:02
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    itchyincharmcity, we haven't had total success isolating the bed, but the last attempt seemed pretty good. I did stop noticing bites for awhile. We even put carpet tape all along the ceiling at the junction with the wall in case bugs tried to climb up the wall to the ceiling. But I woke up with a bite on my face yesterday. Or a big pimple. Everything is a bite now. It doesn't really itch, so I'm not sure.

    lieutenantdan, do you have a specific question? Personally, I choose to NOT use them ever in or around my house (at least in my life pre-bed bugs). That is my personal choice. I believe that these pesticides are tools, they have their uses, and it is up to each individual to decide when and where it is acceptable to use them, given the known toxicity. That's the key. Most people have no idea about the actual toxicity. They think that since it's on the market, it's "safe". Ain't so. It's all about risk assessment.

    I highly recommend this website: http://extoxnet.orst.edu/ghindex.html

    It's a chemical information database. I think you can't plug in trade names, but I'm not sure. For instance, Suspend SC has as its active ingredient deltamethrin. You might have to plug in the name deltamethrin to get toxicology data.

    Hope that helps. Gotta run now.

  20. bummedindenver

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Nov 29 2007 19:19:23
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    By the way, if you use that database, after you type in a chemical name, you get a page that is really hard to read. Try clicking on the name that is at the top. It will take you to a page where the info is presented in a much easier to read form.

    LD50 = the dose that killed 50% of the exposed animals . (LD=lethal dose) Usually an animal receives a dose of a chemical in toxicology studies either orally, dermally (applied to the skin), or injection. That way, the exact amount that the animal received is known.

    So when you read about chemicals, you want a chemical with a really HIGH LD50. That means it took a lot of the chemical to kill 1/2 the population of animals on which it was tested.

    A low LD50 means the chemical is more toxic and it takes less of it to kill the animal.

    That number is good only for Acute Toxicity, or toxicity happening more or less right around the time of the exposure. And it only tells us what does or does not kill an organism quickly. This term is used in contast to chronic toxicity. Chronic toxicity is what happens after an organism has been exposed to something for a good portion of its lifetime.

    LC50 is the lethal concentration, and this is used more for studies when you look at the concentration of the chemical in the air or water. In aquatic toxicology studies, for example, you would use LC50 to study what concentration of a chemical in water killed half the fish, or insects, or whatever, in the water.

    Hope that helps.

  21. bummedindenver

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Nov 29 2007 19:20:42
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    Oh, and if you don't know the actual chemical name of a product, do a Google search. Do something like: name of product, label.

    If you see the actual label of the chemical, it will tell you the chemical name, and not just the trade name which is what we all get from our PCOs. And most labels of products are actually available in pdf form online, I have found.

    Once you have the actual chemical name, you can look up the toxicity. The same chemical active ingredient may be found in multiple products.

  22. nomorebugs

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    Thu Nov 29 2007 19:32:51
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    So bummedindenver, forgive me, I cannot remember anyone's story, even mine. Did you use pesticides in your house to treat bed bugs? Common wisdom is that's it almost impossible to get rid of a mild infestation w/o a residual pesticide.

    Or are you still holding out?

    Thanks.

  23. bummedindenver

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Dec 3 2007 19:34:43
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    nomorebugs,

    No, we used pesticides.....I didn't hold out very long. A few big bites on my face and my no-pesticides-in-my-house attitude vanished.

    we hired what appeared to be a very good PCO, and they sprayed 3 times, spaced by 2 weeks--their standard protocol. The bites never stopped, and even got worse between the 2nd and 3rd spraying, but upon reporting that the third spraying had failed, the PCO (owner of company actually) told me that our bites must be due to something other than bed bugs because they have seen no visual signs of bugs or seen bugs. Don't get me started....this after I did super thorough prep, including massive vacuuming the morning they came. They say our bites aren't bites NOW because......I did the prep and vacuumed up all the evidence.

    Not sure what to do next.

    Owner said they won't come back out without "evidence", and it appears our continued bites are not evidence. So much for the 30-day warranty. In their mind, they are done--they did their job. Now, we have to wait until we have a raging infestation with very clear "evidence" before they will help.

    We have never seen a bug. Never saw one before treatment, and have not seen one after. The PCO saw cast skeletons before the first treatment. We have seen blood spots on our mattress encasements and sheets. That is evidence.....but we don't have a bug to show these people.

    My husband kept getting bit when he sat on a futon that this company said was all clear. So about 10 days after the last treatment, we finally got rid of it.

  24. goawaybugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Dec 4 2007 0:50:19
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    bummed,

    I'm so sorry you're going through this. That waiting stage--where you're searching for evidence and not finding any--can be so taxing. You feel like you want to take action and you can't. I don't have any new ideas for you--just a few recycled ones from posts I have seen.

    There was a post recently from someone who endured 5 months of no evidence before finally locating a dead bug. I bring this up not to suggest you have 5 more months of agony ahead of you, but because I think she credited DE behind the outlets with finally turning up the dead bug. Have you tried DE? It's not a cure-all, but maybe it would help generate evidence?

    Secondly, have you considered a bed bug dog? I think a few people here have been very satisfied with their bed bug dog experiences. Having the dog may or may not turn up evidence of bugs, but would at least pinpoint potential harborages for you to focus your inspections on.

    Finally--and I realize this is remote--but I've read that towards the end of treatments, people have sometimes mistaken old bites for new bites. If you think they're new, I have no doubt they are new. I just throw it out there for the sake of completeness.

    Anyway, sorry I have no new ideas. Just wanted to let you know I feel for you.

  25. (deleted)

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Dec 4 2007 10:36:43
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    BID, I'm so sorry.

    Did you read about Fourt's trap, or should I say, Fourt's Trap (tm)?

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/1318#post-13312

    Desperate times call for ingenuity.

    It worked for Fourt.

    I would try something like this myself if I were in your shoes. Unless your bed is fully isolated, I don't recall?

    Best...

  26. bummedindenver

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Dec 4 2007 14:49:04
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    hopeless....thanks for the link. I had read that thread but forgotten about it.

    The trap idea might be worth trying. At this point, I am thinking we aren't getting bit in the bedroom. The majority of the obvious bites that have occurred post-treatment (on my doubting husband, no less) happened in the family room while he was sitting on the futon down there (the futon the PCO said was all-clear). It's since been trashed, and my husband hasn't noticed new bites.

    I work in an office at home, so I spend WAY more time in the house than he does. I have less obvious/more questionable bite kind of bites--the ones that could be pimples. But then again, I had bites like that pre-treatment too. I only had a few obvious red-welt kind of bites. They were mostly the confusing are they or aren't they kinds....

    goawaybugs...thanks so much! Just hearing from people, as you all know....people who understand, means the world.

    We have used DE in some of our outlets and switchboxes (in only two rooms). My husband was on a roll for a weekend, and did a bunch, but he ran out of steam, as I have, devoting so much energy to the bug thing. We still have a whole house left to do.

    We haven't quite gotten to the dog. I'm sure that will cost a fortune, especially since i do not think there is one in Colorado. If they even would fly the dog out here, I can only imagine how much $$$. But, there may come a day.

    I would say it is possible that I have mistaken some old bites for new bites. But even if that is the case, I definitely have some new "eruptions" as well. A few I even felt happening. I think I am really sensitive to it and I feel a pinch when I get bit. I feel pinch, run to the mirror and see big red welt with raised white bite in the center of bright red welt. My husband, also, who has gotten fewer bites through this, definitely got new bites while napping on the futon AFTER treatment was "completed".

    Thanks, thanks, thanks,to everyone.

  27. nomorebugs

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    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 115

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Dec 4 2007 15:13:58
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    Bummed, how about trying to get the PCO to come out again with a payment for a retreat? Pesticide build up notwithstanding, I think it's a question of economics. At one time they know you had BB. Perhaps they are more willing to treat if it's compensated. This wait for definitive proof is lame. Nymphs are extremely small and hard to detect.

    I'm in the same boat, I'm not waiting for the infestation to grow into adults and lay eggs.


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