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Female Laying Eggs

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  1. ladyoftheleaves

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Fri Nov 30 2018 22:34:19
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    How quickly can a female bed bug lay eggs once she has hitchhiked to a new home? I brought one home last week, and killed it. I found it in my livong room. Jusy wondering how long it will take me to notice a new infestation. I have been checking my couches and bed everyday.

  2. loubugs

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Sat Dec 1 2018 10:13:05
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    If she had mated and eggs had been produced in her ovaries prior to her arriving in your home, then depositing fertile eggs could happen once she arrived.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  3. SalsaVince

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Sat Dec 1 2018 22:45:46
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    That brings up a good question. What is the likelihood that a single pregnant female bug could be the source of a new infestation. Do you know how many eggs that a female would be able to lay without mating again, Lou? I'm very curious about exactly how new infestations start and whether it's more likely that they start from multiple bugs being carried into a new environment or perhaps several eggs being laid on luggage or bags that are carried into a home.

    But back to the original post, I think you always have to assume that if you find a bug that it is not the only one so you are smart to be monitoring for them still. It might take a few weeks before you can see the signs of their presence if there are more but the first thing many have reported seeing is there fecal stains on matresses. It would probably be good too inspect weekly for a few months just to be safe. Be sure to look thoroughly in the seams of the mattress and cushions. Passive monitors and climb ups would make the job easier and are inexpensive.

    "If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles."
    Not an expert. Just a survivor who's still learning.
    Vince
  4. loubugs

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Sun Dec 2 2018 10:19:25
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    SalsaVince - 11 hours ago  » 
    That brings up a good question. What is the likelihood that a single pregnant female bug could be the source of a new infestation. Do you know how many eggs that a female would be able to lay without mating again, Lou? I'm very curious about exactly how new infestations start and whether it's more likely that they start from multiple bugs being carried into a new environment or perhaps several eggs being laid on luggage or bags that are carried into a home.
    But back to the original post, I think you always have to assume that if you find a bug that it is not the only one so you are smart to be monitoring for them still. It might take a few weeks before you can see the signs of their presence if there are more but the first thing many have reported seeing is there fecal stains on matresses. It would probably be good too inspect weekly for a few months just to be safe. Be sure to look thoroughly in the seams of the mattress and cushions. Passive monitors and climb ups would make the job easier and are inexpensive.

    There are various reports on number of eggs deposited and total number produced in a female bed bug lifetime. 1 egg per day or maybe a few more. The sperm from mating lasts 2 weeks or maybe up to 4. Mating has to happen again to acquire more sperm. She has to have blood meals to live and to produce eggs. There are commensal bacteria in her that supply B vitamins. One mated female can produce enough young to start a small, local infestation. Deposited eggs on objects from which nymphs emerge can start a local infestation. The name given is an introduction until that population becomes self replicating. What happens if hundreds of eggs were introduced onto a bed or couch, nymphs hatched and began feeding on the human who uses that furniture? If all are 1st instar nymphs, would it be called an infestation or introduction? An object that contains multiple nymph stages and adults but no eggs- an infestation or introduction?

  5. SalsaVince

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Sun Dec 2 2018 12:39:55
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    Wow. 2 to 4 weeks of egg-laying from just one mating? That is fascinating and terrifying at the same time. Thanks for the info Lou. As always, your expertise is much appreciated.

  6. Rick_C123

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Fri Dec 7 2018 8:29:19
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    Also figure. It takes 5 molts for a nymph to reach egg-laying maturity as an adult.

    Each nymph needs at least one blood meal to molt. Some feed every day. Some can go a week or more between feedings. So, an egg hatched at the first of the month, can reach sexual maturity within a month or so.

    You may not see any adults until a month after you killed Bed Bug Zero!

  7. BigDummy

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Fri Dec 7 2018 9:17:54
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    I toyed around with this a few years ago, I mated a pair that I had raised from eggs and immediately placed them back into their own containers after mating. As long as I was providing the female with a blood meal she was able to drop a clutch of eggs every week for over a month.
    Interesting side note, at the time I was unaware of the storage of sperm, so that second clutch came as quite a surprise.

  8. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Fri Dec 7 2018 9:57:22
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    Hi,

    There has been some interesting research over the years by Prof Mike Siva-Jothy about the spermalidge and its role in reproduction and survival of colonies from lone gravid females. As well as potentially laying eggs soon after arriving in a location with a regular source of food the stored sperm can itself be used as a food reserve if survival dictates it.

    One of the interesting observations over the years has been how much of the egg laying we can direct into the Passive+ Monitors during treatment. This effectively cripples the egg laying cycle and has a massive impact on the resolution rate of infestations. The image below shows a monitor that was dissected by the academics and shows a significant number of egg casings.

    Slide2 by David Cain, on Flickr

    However, please be mindful that the subject of eggs and rogue eggs can be massively triggers / magnetic to peoples anxiety and rather than seeing this as a low level activity people quickly jump to Indian Jones and the temple of doom scenarios which themselves feed the anxiety cycle.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  9. SalsaVince

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Fri Dec 7 2018 15:29:14
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    This has turned into quite an educational thread. Good stuff! I will be looking up that research. Nice experiment BigDummy. And David, I get your point about anxiety over egg talk, but for me, learning about the science of bed bugs takes away some of the mystery and aura of invincibility that they carry. When you see that they do follow patterns and can even been guided to certain habitats to make it easier to monitor or eliminate them, it actually makes me less anxious about them, but I already know I'm weird.

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Fri Dec 7 2018 15:54:04
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    Hi,

    I agree that knowledge is what demystifies and scares away the ghosts.

    But not everyone is at the same stage of their journey.

    Just as we ask people to be mindful of the lack of clarity during anxiety we must at times also be mindful of how subjects are discussed.

    Sadly one common theme has been the disruptive well meaning idea which while on paper or in the mind of an engineer may appear to be correct we deal with biology which is best observed. Today I had two very detailed conversations where people had those “light on moments” but it’s a heck of a lot easier to do in verbal format than text.

    I sometimes muse over the maths and probability of things, if you take a single bed bug there is a 1 in 12 that it is an adult female if all sexes and life stages are equal. If that 1 in 12 it’s difficult to predict if egg laying is feasible, it won’t be 100% but biologically I would expect it to be high as a feature of a good colonisation strategy. This means the number might be as low as 5% but it’s not likely to be higher than 8% either. Yet it’s the most anxiety inducing aspect of the issue.

    My current hypothesis is that eppigenetics has a lot to answer for and we kind of owe it to everyone to start breaking that cycle.

    David


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