Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Detection / Identification of bed bugs

Exposure vs Reawakened bug from dormancy

(5 posts)
  1. tawanda

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Dec 2 2019 16:21:34
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    BB veteran here so I am aware of and have implemented all the protocols.

    We had a light infestation in my son's basement bedroom last year, Jan-Feb. He was going somewhere where he was exposed and bringing them in. We believe they were eradicated and make my son take precautions when coming in the house.

    In May my basement flooded. Lost everything. Walls have been gutted, most of my possessions were discarded. The only thing that hasn't been replaced is the drop ceiling.

    We seem to find a bed bug about every 6 weeks. Just one, although they have varied in size, in weird places. The back of the bathroom door, today one on the couch.

    My husband and I both work in hotels and he has actually been trained in detection and treatment to work in conjunction with the hotel's exterminator. Husband is wondering if some stragglers weren't able to hide somewhere like the drop ceiling ( which has been treated but not recently), go dormant, and are just randomly reappearing. I don't believe bed bugs have the ability to strategize and just wait it out if there's 3 tasty humans to feast upon, so I believe we are being re exposed. My couch is right beside the front door

    There is no evidence of bed bugs anywhere. No poop or blood stains, no cast skins, no one feel "bites". My house pretty much stays in a constant state of treatment because we do get exposed to them at work, I literally have nothing left to treat. Cimexa is in every undisturbed place you can think of. The last bug we found I had the house sprayed with Temprid, that was the end of September.

    I captured the adult male I found on the couch this morning. Roughed him up a bit, interrogated him....where did you come from? do you have friends? the usual, but he wasn't talking. So I kept him hostage in a Ziploc bag and tested out the last of the Temprid I had on him. Just smeared a drop across the inside and put my finger on the outside to lure him towards it. He fell for it. Little suckers can run quickly when they're hungry! Initial effects were quick, periodically checked on his progress, for scientific reasons of course, found it took him about 70 minutes to finally pop off. Should have cooperated, just sayin'...

    I digress. What do you experts say, is this most likely from being exposed over and over, or is it actually possible that these random findings are survivors that have holed up somewhere and come out periodically to feed?

  2. BigDummy

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Dec 2 2019 17:00:57
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    Bed bugs will feed if there is a host, there is no reason to opt out of a meal. Can you post an image with a clear shot of the head so that bat bugs can be ruled out.

  3. tawanda

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Dec 2 2019 17:38:37
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    I'm sorry, I tried, but the resolution on my camera would not be of any help. Is there some distinguishing feature I could look for?

  4. BigDummy

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Tue Dec 3 2019 15:46:25
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    You'll need a magnified view to pick out the individual hairs.

  5. loubugs

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Wed Dec 4 2019 13:00:49
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    tawanda - 1 day ago  » 
    I'm sorry, I tried, but the resolution on my camera would not be of any help. Is there some distinguishing feature I could look for?

    Just set to highest resolution and largest picture size. Put on lined paper so it can focus better. Take a few shots.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.

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