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Does Verifi bed bug monitor actually work?

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  1. robinsmom

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 3:07:51
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    My pco supervisor came today. They have a vested interest in NOT finding bed bugs at this point, more so than actually clearing me, if you know what I mean. (For instance found fresh fecal on my sofa..."that could be anything." (It's fecal and I will prove it with my bb blue--which he said "means nothing".

    So, anyway, in two weeks he's going to return with a couple monitors. The information I have is that this particular company uses Verifi. Pco says it lasts 90 days. The web has mixed reviews, and from what I've read, the CO2 component lasts a miserable 24 hours.

    But I'm willing to try this, if it actually works as advertised. He tol me they work better than the passuve monitors. (That's what he said).

    I just need relief. I told him my only objective is to get my life back. They're fighting my money back (not my money so I have no vested interest in asking for it). Anyone who's been here awhile can relate to getting bitten despite multiple treatments.

    So can these things work? They lock--how can I even know it'll be baited? I won't be able to check it myself, and I already don't trust this company.

    I'm not an expert just a dumb struggling bed bugger like every body else.
  2. bedbugsuptown

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 3:57:35
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    robinsmom,

    This sounds very promising. It's endorsed by the prominent entomologist Dr. Susan Jones. I didn't read anything about the monitor locking though.

    I hope this helps!

  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 6:34:59
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    Hi,

    One of the things to come out of Denver this year was that this product has now been discontinued. I am fairly certain they would not do that with something that was getting amazing results in the field.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  4. BigDummy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 8:24:25
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    You've chosen not to trust other monitors, why would you suddenly change direction? Listen to what others are telling you.

  5. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 10:09:14
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    Since you asked above:
    "Does Verifi bed bug monitor actually work?"

    The short answer is: yes and no.

    Allow me to explain.

    Firstly, this device suffered from an over promise and under deliver type thing. The over promise part included assertions on how far that this device would draw bed bugs from and the duration time (or how long) the carbon dioxide attractant would be emitted from the device after installation. As you might understand, these marketing overstatements served to set the bar rather high for the market's performance expectations regarding this product. Further, at nearly $30 each per unit (~ $28 ea) and the use directions advising the placement of four per hotel room, the cost per installation was high as well.

    In reality, the "draw distances" and the carbon dioxide emission delivery were far less than reported.

    The introduction of this product was viewed with great anticipation and enthusiasm by the US Professional market. Believe it or not, these folks actually want (and need) efficacious products and devices which will help them to deliver excellent services to their customers. This product was launched with great fanfare via well produced marketing documents, numerous technical presentations and an invite only type reception at the national conference. As such, as they do with all such new product launches to the US pro market, the manufacturer made sure that all the key pro market players were aware of the product.

    As a result, nearly all the US pro market significant companies "bought in" to this product by ordering in cases of this device "to use and try" at their bed bug accounts. While some companies ordered a modest quantity, others went perhaps "all in" and purchased numerous cases. However, the US market field results seemed to be a tad different than what was presented and expected.

    In the past I've posted that the US pest pro market will learn and tell us about product efficacy rather quickly and this is a classic text book example of this "market phenomenon". Pest pros called other pest pros to discuss and the word on the street began to trickle in.

    You might ask: "How long did it take for the US professional market to learn this via their field experience?" About 37 seconds.

    So, what's the "yes and no" mean?

    Does it catch bed bugs? Yes, it can but not as well or reliably as presented.

    Does it attract bed bugs? Yes, but from only a few inches away.

    Does it emit carbon dioxide for many hours? A few hours yes, not 24 hours.

    Do the human kairimones (sp?) attract bed bugs for ninety days? Uh, er, not so much. And, there are those researchers who question the value of such compounds so, there's that . . .

    Is it well designed? Hmmm . . . this is rather subjective however, here's some of the common observations from the US professional field/market:

    > The unit is too large for it's intended purpose which makes it difficult to place discretely and in the desired locations.

    > The device costs too much as no hotel is going to pay for four of these per room ($28 x 4 = $112 pco cost) in addition to what needs to be charged for inspections and treatments.

    > The unit has a "peal & stick" type adhesive pad type part to fasten it in place. Those PCOs/PMPs that stuck this thing in place were soon having to repair damaged sheetrock walls and deal with both technician and customer complaints on this issue.

    > The unit is basically a pitfall type trap where the live bug "falls in" to the slick walled trap area at the top. However, along one side is a parallel ridged a tactile harborage area that bed bugs could easily climb and hide in. In the field, we'd find that bed bugs would hide/harbor and lay eggs in this area. As such, the device was "somewhat good" in this regard as long as it was in place. However, since we could attain the same results using just cardboard, which is basically free, why would we want to spend $28 for this?

    Currently the unit is discontinued however, there may be some still for sale by distributors who have remaining stock.

    Do I recommend it for my clients as a viable and useful tool? (YOU tell me.)

    Overall, we all wanted this thing to really work. In my view; it needed to be smaller, needed to emit CO2 for many days and not just hours and needed to be cost effective to meet the market expectations.

    Hope this helps, have a nice day ! pjb

  6. bedbugsuptown

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 10:26:16
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    Thanks Paul, however disappointing.

  7. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 10:37:09
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    @pjb. Do I recommend it for my clients as a viable and useful tool? (YOU tell me.)
    ------
    Let me buy a case of those and the Brooklyn Bridge.

  8. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 10:42:07
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    Well, at least the Brooklyn Bridge works as a bridge. But, I could sell you a multi-year lease for your own toll booth business on that bridge. It's a good deal; just $50 down, $50 a month for fifty years !

  9. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 10:52:07
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    ". . . however disappointing. "

    We're missing the point here kids !

    (Note, anyone offended by the use of the word "kids" her, stop reading now !)

    As of today, there's no silver bullet type magic for bed bugs and we shouldn't be sitting there at the edge of our seats waiting for one.

    Plus, why do we, as consumers, think that we need someone to package and sell us some sort of "cure" type thing when there's many things that we can do ourselves with modest effort that will actually work?

    What we need to do is become knowledgeable and take suitable actions based upon that knowledge in order to successfully deal with bed bugs and eliminate them from our homes and lives.

    As such, here's the important take away messages from this:

    > We know that bed bugs are tactile and their preferences. As such, we can construct a decent bed bug monitor/trap device based upon this behavior.

    > If you MUST have a bed bug trap/monitor for whatever reason, you can make such a device using cardboard for "essentially free".

    > And, since these devices can be "essentially free" you can place ten or ten thousand of them if you wish.

    Let's remember that all you need to do to eliminate the bed bugs in your home is inspect and treat all the places where the bed bugs are.

    Not just a few of them, not just most of them but ALL of them.

    Have a nice day ! pjb

  10. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 11:20:02
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    P Bello -  » 
    We're missing the point here kids !
    (Note, anyone offended by the use of the word "kids" her, stop reading now !)

    Whoa! Wait! What?! . . . ummm if we stop reading at this point . . . isn’t it just a tad too late . . . as we’ve already read the offending “kids”!! Just say’n!! bwahahahaha

    P Bello -  » 
    As of today, there's no silver bullet type magic for bed bugs and we shouldn't be sitting there at the edge of our seats waiting for one.

    The HELL you say! . . . Hope springs eternal PB!

    Ok, now, onto a little more serious topic . . .

    P Bello -  » 
    Do I recommend it for my clients as a viable and useful tool? (YOU tell me.)

    .

    P Bello -  » 
    > If you MUST have a bed bug trap/monitor for whatever reason, you can make such a device using cardboard for "essentially free".

    You have me curious . . . what type of monitor devices do YOU recommend for your clients. . . cardboard?

  11. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 11:28:52
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    Hmmm . . .

    this probably needs to be a different thread so . . .

    pjb

  12. loubugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 18:31:36
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    I won't have to write anything since Paul has done so. And David's noted that at the Denver meeting we learned that it's been discontinued for "doing so well".
    How about this one? Heat and carbon dioxide with sticky trap base. I've not yet seen one only in pictures.
    The bed bug monitor of Frowein GmbH & Co. KG and the sort of info they provide:
    http://www.frowein808.de/uploads/141925614583.03.pdf

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  13. bedbugsuptown

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 19:01:50
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    Hmmm . . .

    this probably needs to be a different thread so . . .

    pjb

    Well you started here Kiddo.

    A lot of energy in that post...........silver bullets n' all--no comment.

    I respect you plenty and I'm nobody here but I ain't gonna pull no punches--what makes you think every one is as smart as you? If I gave you detailed instruction, even a demonstration on how to paint a portrait that looks like the subject--you think your up to that?

  14. robinsmom

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 23:02:21
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    BigDummy - 14 hours ago  » 
    You've chosen not to trust other monitors, why would you suddenly change direction? Listen to what others are telling you.

    Good question. My answer is that in order for me to get my money back my exterminator is telling me I have to have monitirs. I was promised that these things deliver.

    I'm in a quandary. I order to get another PCo in my sister needs the money back. (It has a guarentee). However if you are telling me that this monitor is not accepted as a good monitoring standard then by no means will I permit its use. I've already stated the company I used has an interest in NOT finding bed bugs. It was never me who chose Verifi, it is what the corporate said they will do to "prove " They did their job. They don't consider fecal or skin casts proof bb exist.

  15. robinsmom

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 23:34:14
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    P Bello - 13 hours ago  » 
    Since you asked above:
    "Does Verifi bed bug monitor actually work?"
    The short answer is: yes and no.
    Allow me to explain.
    Firstly, this device suffered from an over promise and under deliver type thing. The over promise part included assertions on how far that this device would draw bed bugs from and the duration time (or how long) the carbon dioxide attractant would be emitted from the device after installation. As you might understand, these marketing overstatements served to set the bar rather high for the market's performance expectations regarding this product. Further, at nearly $30 each per unit (~ $28 ea) and the use directions advising the placement of four per hotel room, the cost per installation was high as well.
    In reality, the "draw distances" and the carbon dioxide emission delivery were far less than reported.
    The introduction of this product was viewed with great anticipation and enthusiasm by the US Professional market. Believe it or not, these folks actually want (and need) efficacious products and devices which will help them to deliver excellent services to their customers. This product was launched with great fanfare via well produced marketing documents, numerous technical presentations and an invite only type reception at the national conference. As such, as they do with all such new product launches to the US pro market, the manufacturer made sure that all the key pro market players were aware of the product.
    As a result, nearly all the US pro market significant companies "bought in" to this product by ordering in cases of this device "to use and try" at their bed bug accounts. While some companies ordered a modest quantity, others went perhaps "all in" and purchased numerous cases. However, the US market field results seemed to be a tad different than what was presented and expected.
    In the past I've posted that the US pest pro market will learn and tell us about product efficacy rather quickly and this is a classic text book example of this "market phenomenon". Pest pros called other pest pros to discuss and the word on the street began to trickle in.
    You might ask: "How long did it take for the US professional market to learn this via their field experience?" About 37 seconds.
    So, what's the "yes and no" mean?
    Does it catch bed bugs? Yes, it can but not as well or reliably as presented.
    Does it attract bed bugs? Yes, but from only a few inches away.
    Does it emit carbon dioxide for many hours? A few hours yes, not 24 hours.
    Do the human kairimones (sp?) attract bed bugs for ninety days? Uh, er, not so much. And, there are those researchers who question the value of such compounds so, there's that . . .
    Is it well designed? Hmmm . . . this is rather subjective however, here's some of the common observations from the US professional field/market:
    > The unit is too large for it's intended purpose which makes it difficult to place discretely and in the desired locations.
    > The device costs too much as no hotel is going to pay for four of these per room ($28 x 4 = $112 pco cost) in addition to what needs to be charged for inspections and treatments.
    > The unit has a "peal & stick" type adhesive pad type part to fasten it in place. Those PCOs/PMPs that stuck this thing in place were soon having to repair damaged sheetrock walls and deal with both technician and customer complaints on this issue.
    > The unit is basically a pitfall type trap where the live bug "falls in" to the slick walled trap area at the top. However, along one side is a parallel ridged a tactile harborage area that bed bugs could easily climb and hide in. In the field, we'd find that bed bugs would hide/harbor and lay eggs in this area. As such, the device was "somewhat good" in this regard as long as it was in place. However, since we could attain the same results using just cardboard, which is basically free, why would we want to spend $28 for this?
    Currently the unit is discontinued however, there may be some still for sale by distributors who have remaining stock.
    Do I recommend it for my clients as a viable and useful tool? (YOU tell me.)
    Overall, we all wanted this thing to really work. In my view; it needed to be smaller, needed to emit CO2 for many days and not just hours and needed to be cost effective to meet the market expectations.
    Hope this helps, have a nice day ! pjb

    Between you and David and the others, this really sets in stone how truly weirdly this company is claiming they can detect bed bugs. Unless they have switched from Verifi--I will confirm next week--then it's mind boggling that they would charge $50 per unit, place one per room, then charge $35 a month just to monitor the thing.

    This is the crux of my issue...I have had to--this is sooo unlike me--to contact the state consumer division of the AG office, to tell them it's not just that I found a live bed bug 3 months after yreatment began, but that my contract had them treating my dressers--never happened, they sprayed in my dresser--and that I was promised, as "bed bug specialists" they would use heat, cryo, and multiple methods to attack the issue. I got 5 minutes spray, and mattress encasements, had to insist they treat under my tables and upholstered chairs, as well as closets. Guy stood in center of room and sprayed from 4 feet away, refused my two offers that I remove dust cover of sofa, claimed bb molted once, could be killed if I took Benedryl, and I didn't get my baseboards sprayed again (only partially) something like 5-6 weeks later. He looked at my bb cast skin and told me to my face that NOBODY could determine if it even belonged to a bed bug...looked at fecal (I proved with bb blue), and said "ah, it's just a spot, means nothing).

    The impression I get is they feel it's not worth identifying or treating til the bb reach into the hundreds. Ummmm....plus after clearing me 4 times but insisted the reason my apartment was so tough was because, "despite using multiple methods, my apartment is, unfortunately, infested with bed bugs." Pretty much exact words per the letter they sent the attorney general explaining their position. So on the one hand I have an infestation--THEIR words, got it on paper--and yet, mysteriously, an infestation their supposed experts cannot find. I think they kinda hung themselves, to be honest, though another PCo might defend them. I'm hoping to get some POV here.

    Yea, my head wants to explode. But hey, I don't want to mistake brain matter for a well fed bed bug.


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