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do you have to use talc powder in your climb ups?

(20 posts)
  1. tiredofbedbugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 26 2010 14:20:12
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    We have had climb ups for months now and in the beginning i would put talc powder inside the dishes.. my new PCO told me few months ago that i didnt need to put in talc powder and that the slippery surface would be enough to prevent bed bugs from climbing in or out.

    i have never ever found any bed bugs in the dishes-- with and without using talc.
    anyone know if not using talc is ok?

  2. spideyjg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 26 2010 15:18:49
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    BBs aren't the greatest climbers anyhow but the talc adds an extra element of slippery to the climbup to prevent escape.

    Jim

  3. parakeets

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 26 2010 16:01:13
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    I do think the talc helps. I am always impressed at bedbugs ability to climb through just about anything. There are people who believe bedbugs can't climb smooth plastic or metal. I disagree since I have seen bedbugs doing just that. So talc could help.

  4. spideyjg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 26 2010 16:42:17
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    parakeets - 35 minutes ago  » 
    I do think the talc helps. I am always impressed at bedbugs ability to climb through just about anything. There are people who believe bedbugs can't climb smooth plastic or metal. I disagree since I have seen bedbugs doing just that. So talc could help.

    Compared to flies, ants, spiders, and most roaches, BBs are lousy climbers. They can climb smooth surfaces but not as well as other critters.

    Recently a picture was posted showing the "sticky" pads of a roach and a BB. the BB had far less.

    Jim

  5. tiredofbedbugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 26 2010 17:11:18
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    thanks everyone- i shall purchase some talc powder sooon

  6. TheKnightRider

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jul 16 2010 20:04:00
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    Baby powder is made from talcum (Talc) or corn starch. Check the label. Johnsons--Johnsons baby powder is available in both talc or corn starch formulations. Talc works better than corn starch to stop bed bugs from climbing. I wash my interceptors out once a month and lightly re- apply the talc with a cotton ball or tissue. This is very important because it makes the walls way more slippery. A build up of house dust, hair or lint could give the bugs more grip. Handle the traps by the edges after re-appling the talc, or your fingers could remove the talc layer.
    Get the baby powder with talc and parfum only, the one without lavender and chamomile. The parfum should not affect anything.
    Dont breath in talc dust, it is bad for you lungs! Only use the cornstarch baby powder for children!

  7. TheKnightRider

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 4:13:59
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    It is critical that you clean and re apply talc in your interceptors regularly. Talc makes a huge difference in than ability of all bugs to climb.
    I did an experiment with ants. I put some ants in a clean (no talc) 3" plastic container. The ants could walk up the smooth plastic and escape fairly easily. I caught some more ants and put them in a plastic container coated with talc. None of the small red ants could escape nor could the big black "army" ant. It was like they were on a tread mill when they tried to climb up the wall.

    I heard bed bugs can't climb as well as ants, so if ants can't escape from talc coated plastic, then bed bugs can’t for sure, however just like the ants could, I am guessing bed bugs could also climb plastic not treated with a layer of talc baby powder.

  8. JWhiteBBCTV

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 6:30:37
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    You have to use talc powder with the Climbups. The bugs can escape if it's not in place. We have documented it in the lab experiments. They all won't escape but some will.

    If you don't use it the Climupbs will not function properly. I don't really blame the one technician for saying he thought the slippery surface would be enough as I would have never thought they could climb out. But the bottom line is that if the talc isn't in place and the Climbups aren't getting cleaned once they are dirty and the talc reapplied, the bugs may escape.

  9. bugnut

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 7:11:18
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    Jeff,

    For 2 weeks I foolishly put baby oil in the outer ring! I have cleaned them out and re-applied the talc as directed.

    Another thing that concerns me, when I received the climb ups they were stacked together - the factory applied talc was on the outside of 11 of the 12 I ordered - I read the instructions and there was no mention of the tape on the outside wall of the climb up. So we assumed it was for shipping purposes and pulled it off.

    NOW I happened to view an video of "ask the exterminator" (which is posted on the Climb Up Interceptors site) and they say not only to leave the tape on, as it provides a rough surface for the bugs to climb on, but to replace it periodically. This information does not appear on the instructions! (i re-read the ones I received and the pdf online)

    So I have had these things in place since June incorrectly because of a flaw in the instructions? If this is true I am furious and writing a letter to the manufacturer.

  10. JWhiteBBCTV

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 7:57:19
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    They work much better with the tape on as it's a much more attractive surface to walk on for the bugs. I don't think the talc on the tape will affect much of the functionality.

    The directions should probably mention that the tape should be left on as you're not the first to be confused and I've even heard of pest control professionals telling people to take it off. I'm sure that's a quick fix for the manufacturer.

    I'll also keep that in mind for my videos are we are starting to reshoot and update some of the older ones and that's definitely something worth mentioning.

  11. bugnut

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 8:06:49
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    Thanks Jeff -

    I was not your video I said BTW, but if you could mention it in one of your new ones it would be great. I used painted tape to replace - it seems like it has a bit of a "tooth" and I could not find anything else that would work as well.

  12. JWhiteBBCTV

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 9:55:53
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    It's cloth tape. You can get it at your local CVS/Rite-Aid/pharmacy.

  13. diebbsdie

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 21:25:15
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    Grrrrr...one more tiny detail that makes a TON of difference in the bed bug battle!

    I have been applying baby powder into the climbups, thinking I was ok. Now I am reading this and discover I have to go out and buy baby powder made from Talc and not corn starch? Wow, the complexity of this situation just keeps getting more and more intense!

    This whole process has just been one "Doh!" after another! Every time you think you're on the right track, someone points something like this out to you and you realize, once again, how little you know about this problem! It's pretty frustrating. But, on the bright side, I'm glad this site exists!

  14. JWhiteBBCTV

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 21:35:53
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    I've never had an issue with the cornstarch version. I didn't realize they made two versions (talc and cornstarch) until the other day. I've used the cornstarch and caught bugs but I can't say I've tried both under a controlled atmosphere. So since I've caught bugs with cornstarch and therefore I assume cornstarch works. Since it wasn't controlled I wouldn't know if any escaped but I know it catches bugs.

  15. diebbsdie

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 22:12:51
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    thanks, Jeff, as always....you are truly a huge help.

    i might go get some talc powder tomorrow, but can sleep well tonight knowing that the cornstarch version will work as well!

  16. Eve

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Aug 2 2010 22:16:49
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    When I was doing research about where to buy this talc powder I noticed a *lot* of sites that were moving to get the stuff banned. So I bought a giant bottle of the talc baby powder (these groups are especially adamant about this product used near babies).

    Eve

  17. TheKnightRider

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Aug 3 2010 1:22:48
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    Wal-Mart still sells talc and cornstarch baby powders. As far as what works better for lubricating climb-ups, the talc "feels" more slippery to me. But as Jeff says, cornstarch is also proven to work. I will be doing some experiments with ants to see if one works better than the other. (I can't use bed bugs since I only find an occasional one)

    I would keep tape on the outside wall of the climb-ups. It should not need replacing very often. If you accidentally get some talc on the tape, just wipe it off with a damp paper towel.
    I think hockey tape would work well to give bed bugs a good grip. It is made of fabric and has rough surface. (use white tape instead of black to see bugs easier). Hockey tape is much cheaper then bandage tape.

  18. tommyt1971

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 8 2010 16:51:21
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    I think that talc powder also serves another purpose too: suffocation. I just recently had a new bed set delivered aft my old one became infested & my landlord had his maint guy spray my place (a method I just don't trust at all & was right to!) aft I'd been plagued w/bites for a couple mos - I thought, quite incorrectly, that it was a persistent rash, they sort of run in the family.

    Anyway, I put Climbups under every leg of my new metal frame & when I inspected them last night I found a single bedbug in one of the cups, trapped & dead in the outer chamber. I'd read that BBs can live up to 18 mos w/out feeding so my conclusion was that the talc, which had covered the bug's underside, had suffocated it.

    Talc may have the same sort of effect that diatomaceous earth is reputed to have, which is also supposed to suffocate the little bastards.

    I also found an alternative to the climbups that worked quite well for my couch: I bought small, one-use paint trays at Home Depot which were made of a slippery plastic that I tested on a few live specimens. I was quite fortunate too, they hadn't infested my futon, which was my bed for about 2 wks while I got a new bed.

  19. so unsettling

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 8 2010 18:19:00
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    I've also noticed that it's important not to put too much talc on. It seems like when my supply first arrived, I could hardly see it except here and there. When I redusted them, I think I put too much in and this makes identification of whatever shows up in there more difficult. We leave them down a while, and it seems like the things that land in there deteriorate in talc after a while it there is too much. Hard to see what they really are. I just redusted mine lightly, with baby powder.

  20. peppy

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Dec 10 2010 12:30:17
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    Uh oh. I have had interceptors for four months and haven't cleaned them at all. Can someone share their cleaning process? What do you clean them with? How do you dry them? How do you apply the talc? Thanks!


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